Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Insects Take a Breather
Cool Penguins
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
Pipefish power from mom
Body clocks
Birds
Cardinals
Doves
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
A Spider's Silky Strength
Computers
Small but WISE
Earth from the inside out
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Halibut
Electric Catfish
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math of the World
Math Naturals
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
A Fix for Injured Knees
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Octopuses
Starfish
Mammals
Woolly Mammoths
Whales
Yaks
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Seeds of the Future
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Sea Turtles
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Slip Sliming Away
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Crawfish

Crayfish, sometimes called crawfish, or crawdads are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. They are found in bodies of fresh water that do not freeze to the bottom, and which have shelter against predators. Some crayfish have been found living as much as 3 m (10 feet) underground. Moulting: Crayfish need to moult as they grow because their hard exoskeletons do not allow much room for expansion. Baby crayfish can moult on a daily basis but as they grow older, the regularity of moults decreases to a period of weeks or even months. The first few days after a moult, a crayfish's skin is very soft and it is very vulnerable to attacks from other animals and crayfish. Early Signs: The early signs of moulting include lack of appetite and a slowdown in activity. During this period the crayfish ingests calcium into an internal organ, not into the exoskeleton. Hiding: When the crayfish is ready to moult, it will try to find a hiding spot. Then it will move onto its back and begin fanning its pincers, legs and swimmerets (under the tail) in order to get as much oxygen as possible. The carapace will begin to crack behind the head; the new appendages then pierce the old shell; and then after about five minutes, a sudden, violent movement will detach the old shell from the crayfish. Vulnerable: The freshly moulted crayfish will invariably be larger as part of the growing process, but is vulnerable on several fronts. Firstly, the shell is very soft and vulnerable to predators, including other crayfish and fish. The crayfish needs to eat the old shell to replace the lost calcium and strengthen the weakened carapace. Pets: Crayfish are sometimes kept as pets in freshwater aquariums. They prefer foods like shrimp pellets or various vegetables but will eat most leftover fish food. They also have a big appetite for plants and will eat most aquarium plants. They can be aggressive and may attempt to eat fish. However, crayfish are actually fairly shy and may often attempt to hide under leaves or rocks. If you are going to keep a crayfish as a pet, remember to give it some hiding space. At night, some fish become less energetic and settle to the bottom. The crayfish might see it as a danger and hurt or kill it with its claws. Crayfish are great escape artists and may try to climb out of the tank so any holes in the hood should be covered. In nations where imported alien crayfish are a danger to rivers, such as England, catching and keeping crayfish as pets is one of the main means of the spread of destructive species - since they are often flung back into a different river.

Crawfish
Crawfish








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™