Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Fast-flying fungal spores
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Behavior
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Brainy bees know two from three
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Condors
Cardinals
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
When frog gender flips
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
New twists for phantom limbs
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Island Extinctions
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Bull Sharks
Mako Sharks
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Yummy bugs
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Math of the World
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Cell Phone Tattlers
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Clams
Camel Spiders
Corals
Mammals
Minks
Blue Bear
Badgers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
IceCube Science
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Project Music
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Nature's Alphabet
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Caimans
Box Turtles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Cool as a Jupiter
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Dancing with Robots
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Cousin Earth

As their search continues, astronomers are finding more and more planets orbiting nearby stars. This time, they've detected a solid planet that's just 15 light-years from Earth. Many details about the planet remain unknown because the astronomers didn't see it directly. Instead, they were able to detect how the planet's gravity makes its star wobble a little bit. Out of 156 planets discovered so far in other solar systems, the new extrasolar planet is the smallest one yet found. It's about 7.5 times heavier than Earth. Along with two, much bigger planets, the new world orbits a star called Gliese 876. The planet takes just 1.9 days to complete an orbit around Gliese 876. So, its year is much, much shorter than ours. It's so close to its star that its surface is hot enough to roast a chicken. Most extrasolar planets that have been found so far are big balls of gas, like Jupiter and Saturn. Because the planet's mass is low, it probably couldn't hold onto much gas. So, scientists suspect that it's rocky. "This could be the first [known] rocky planet around any normal star other than the sun," says team member Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif. Scientists are still trying to figure out how rocky planets might form so close to their stars. Whatever the answer, the new discovery gives researchers confidence that they will one day find even closer cousins to Earth somewhere in the universe. And, on a planet resembling Earth, they might also discover traces of life as we know it.E. Sohn

Cousin Earth
Cousin Earth








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™