Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
New Mammals
From Chimps to People
Walks on the Wild Side
Behavior
Night of the living ants
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Eating Troubles
Birds
Crows
Turkeys
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Lighting goes digital
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
Programming with Alice
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Dino Takeout for Mammals
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
A Global Warming Flap
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Blooming Jellies
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Tilapia
Nurse Sharks
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chocolate Rules
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
A New Touch
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Electricity's Spark of Life
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Squid
Invertebrates
Mammals
Baboons
Kodiak Bear
Donkeys
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Black Hole Journey
Invisibility Ring
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Stalking Plants by Scent
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Chameleons
Rattlesnakes
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Unveiling Titan
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Weaving with Light
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Catching Some Rays
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami

Tiny coral-reef islands far out in the ocean may seem fragile. But scientists now know that they aren't so easily swept away.In December 2004, a large, undersea earthquake rumbled in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Sumatra. The earthquake triggered a tsunami, or a series of large, destructive waves, that traveled across the ocean in all directions (see "Wave of Destruction"). The Maldives, a nation of about 1,200 islands southwest of India, were in the tsunami's path. The islands of the Maldives are made up of coral reefs built on top of the craters of a range of undersea volcanoes. The land surface, which is coral and sand, is just above sea level. The 2004 tsunami was devastating to the people of the Maldives. It flooded many of the islands and left 80 people dead. Scientists had worried that the tsunami might badly damage the land surface, too, by permanently sweeping away much of the islands' sand. But when researchers went back to study the sand depths and new shorelines, they found that the islands themselves had survived. The waves carved away parts of the sandy cliffs and beaches on one side of the islands but put sand back on the opposite coast. That's similar to the effect of monsoon winds. The winds blow across the islands in one direction in summer and in the opposite direction in winter, moving sand back and forth between the two coasts. The sand changes places but doesn't disappear. The islands' remoteness may have helped protect them, the researchers say. The tsunami waves that hit the Maldives were only one-fifth the height of the ones that swept over Thailand. That's because tsunami waves grow taller as the sea gets shallower, which occurs near a large land mass or a continent. But in the deep ocean around the reef islands, the waves didn't have time to grow to great heights.—C. Gramling

Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™