Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Watering the Air
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
New Monkey Business
How to Silence a Cricket
Color-Changing Bugs
Face values
Baby Number Whizzes
Eating Troubles
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Boosting Fuel Cells
Small but WISE
Nonstop Robot
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Wave of Destruction
Farms sprout in cities
Flu river
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Sahara Cemetery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The Essence of Celery
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Spit Power
Nature's Medicines
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Dust Mites
Asian Elephants
Blue Bear
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Project Music
Powering Ball Lightning
Black Hole Journey
Assembling the Tree of Life
Flower family knows its roots
Fungus Hunt
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
Catching a Comet's Tail
Chaos Among the Planets
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Riding Sunlight
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Arctic Melt
A Change in Climate
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Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwards, the observer bees tended to go to fake flowers of the same color. When the scientists put the demonstrator bee on fake flowers of a different color instead, the other bees also often made the switch. In another study, researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson went a step further. The scientists used bees that had been trained to visit either orange or green fake flowers. They also used a group of bees that had never seen these kinds of fake flowers before. First, the untrained bees sat in a cage and watched for 10 minutes as the trained bees visited one of the two colored flowers. To remove the scent of bees, the scientists then took these flowers away and replaced them with a different set of orange and green fake flowers. And, to prevent the bees from memorizing locations, the scientists arranged the new flowers in a different pattern. Next, the researchers let loose one test bee at a time. Some test bees had watched the demonstrators. Others had not. Both were equally likely to visit orange flowers. This makes sense because bumblebees often visit orange flowers in the wild. Test bees were 50 percent more likely to visit green flowers, however, if they had watched other bees do it first. In a similar experiment, the researchers made fake bees and put them on green flowers, while untrained bees watched. The observer bees were twice as likely to visit green flowers after watching the display than they were before watching it. Green flowers are unusual in nature, so bees probably won't visit them without seeing an example first. Together, the studies have persuaded researchers that bees can learn new behaviors by watching each other. This kind of social learning is common in people and other vertebrates, but these experiments were the first tests on bees. Bumblebees, it turns out, notice a lot more than you might think.E. Sohn


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