Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Gliders in the Family
Feeding School for Meerkats
Insect Stowaways
Behavior
Sugar-pill medicine
Fear Matters
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Roadrunners
Cranes
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Atomic Drive
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Earth from the inside out
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
A Living Fossil
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Ancient Heights
Deep History
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
Food Web Woes
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
Manta Rays
Perches
Skates
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Making good, brown fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Setting a Prime Number Record
Math of the World
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
Hear, Hear
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Lobsters
Flatworms
Oysters
Mammals
Dalmatians
Opposum
Bulldogs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
One ring around them all
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Project Music
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Sweet, Sticky Science
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Pluto's New Moons
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Searching for Alien Life
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwards, the observer bees tended to go to fake flowers of the same color. When the scientists put the demonstrator bee on fake flowers of a different color instead, the other bees also often made the switch. In another study, researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson went a step further. The scientists used bees that had been trained to visit either orange or green fake flowers. They also used a group of bees that had never seen these kinds of fake flowers before. First, the untrained bees sat in a cage and watched for 10 minutes as the trained bees visited one of the two colored flowers. To remove the scent of bees, the scientists then took these flowers away and replaced them with a different set of orange and green fake flowers. And, to prevent the bees from memorizing locations, the scientists arranged the new flowers in a different pattern. Next, the researchers let loose one test bee at a time. Some test bees had watched the demonstrators. Others had not. Both were equally likely to visit orange flowers. This makes sense because bumblebees often visit orange flowers in the wild. Test bees were 50 percent more likely to visit green flowers, however, if they had watched other bees do it first. In a similar experiment, the researchers made fake bees and put them on green flowers, while untrained bees watched. The observer bees were twice as likely to visit green flowers after watching the display than they were before watching it. Green flowers are unusual in nature, so bees probably won't visit them without seeing an example first. Together, the studies have persuaded researchers that bees can learn new behaviors by watching each other. This kind of social learning is common in people and other vertebrates, but these experiments were the first tests on bees. Bumblebees, it turns out, notice a lot more than you might think.E. Sohn

Copybees
Copybees








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™