Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Springing forward
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
G-Tunes with a Message
Not Slippery When Wet
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
A Light Delay
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Surprise Visitor
Birds
Condors
Quails
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Sugary Survival Skill
The science of disappearing
Computers
Computers with Attitude
Hubble trouble doubled
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
A Dino King's Ancestor
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
The Rise of Yellowstone
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
A Change in Leaf Color
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Electric Catfish
Catfish
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Attacking Asthma
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Starfish
Sea Urchin
Corals
Mammals
Quokkas
Koalas
Pekingese
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Invisibility Ring
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
The algae invasion
Bright Blooms That Glow
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Turtles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Roving the Red Planet
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Catching Some Rays
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Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwards, the observer bees tended to go to fake flowers of the same color. When the scientists put the demonstrator bee on fake flowers of a different color instead, the other bees also often made the switch. In another study, researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson went a step further. The scientists used bees that had been trained to visit either orange or green fake flowers. They also used a group of bees that had never seen these kinds of fake flowers before. First, the untrained bees sat in a cage and watched for 10 minutes as the trained bees visited one of the two colored flowers. To remove the scent of bees, the scientists then took these flowers away and replaced them with a different set of orange and green fake flowers. And, to prevent the bees from memorizing locations, the scientists arranged the new flowers in a different pattern. Next, the researchers let loose one test bee at a time. Some test bees had watched the demonstrators. Others had not. Both were equally likely to visit orange flowers. This makes sense because bumblebees often visit orange flowers in the wild. Test bees were 50 percent more likely to visit green flowers, however, if they had watched other bees do it first. In a similar experiment, the researchers made fake bees and put them on green flowers, while untrained bees watched. The observer bees were twice as likely to visit green flowers after watching the display than they were before watching it. Green flowers are unusual in nature, so bees probably won't visit them without seeing an example first. Together, the studies have persuaded researchers that bees can learn new behaviors by watching each other. This kind of social learning is common in people and other vertebrates, but these experiments were the first tests on bees. Bumblebees, it turns out, notice a lot more than you might think.E. Sohn

Copybees
Copybees








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