Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
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Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
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Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Bee Disease
Clone Wars
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Newly named fish crawls and hops
Taking a Spill for Science
A brain-boosting video game
Birds
Mockingbirds
Albatrosses
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Silk’s superpowers
The memory of a material
Computers
A Light Delay
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Feathered Fossils
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Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Earth's Poles in Peril
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Food Web Woes
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
If Only Bones Could Speak
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Sturgeons
Lungfish
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
The Color of Health
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Spit Power
Attacking Asthma
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Insects
Sponges
Millipedes
Mammals
Rats
African Leopards
German Shepherds
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
One ring around them all
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Turtles
Crocodilians
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Machine Copy
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Arctic Melt
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwards, the observer bees tended to go to fake flowers of the same color. When the scientists put the demonstrator bee on fake flowers of a different color instead, the other bees also often made the switch. In another study, researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson went a step further. The scientists used bees that had been trained to visit either orange or green fake flowers. They also used a group of bees that had never seen these kinds of fake flowers before. First, the untrained bees sat in a cage and watched for 10 minutes as the trained bees visited one of the two colored flowers. To remove the scent of bees, the scientists then took these flowers away and replaced them with a different set of orange and green fake flowers. And, to prevent the bees from memorizing locations, the scientists arranged the new flowers in a different pattern. Next, the researchers let loose one test bee at a time. Some test bees had watched the demonstrators. Others had not. Both were equally likely to visit orange flowers. This makes sense because bumblebees often visit orange flowers in the wild. Test bees were 50 percent more likely to visit green flowers, however, if they had watched other bees do it first. In a similar experiment, the researchers made fake bees and put them on green flowers, while untrained bees watched. The observer bees were twice as likely to visit green flowers after watching the display than they were before watching it. Green flowers are unusual in nature, so bees probably won't visit them without seeing an example first. Together, the studies have persuaded researchers that bees can learn new behaviors by watching each other. This kind of social learning is common in people and other vertebrates, but these experiments were the first tests on bees. Bumblebees, it turns out, notice a lot more than you might think.—E. Sohn

Copybees
Copybees








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