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From dipping to fishing
Swedish Rhapsody
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Spinning Clay into Cotton
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth Rocks On
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Ready, unplug, drive
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
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Ancient Cave Behavior
An Ancient Childhood
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Sting Ray
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Making good, brown fat
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A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
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How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Play for Science
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
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Foul Play?
Gut Microbes and Weight
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
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Praying Mantis
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Doberman Pinschers
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Einstein's Skateboard
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Flower family knows its roots
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Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
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What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Arctic Melt
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Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwards, the observer bees tended to go to fake flowers of the same color. When the scientists put the demonstrator bee on fake flowers of a different color instead, the other bees also often made the switch. In another study, researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson went a step further. The scientists used bees that had been trained to visit either orange or green fake flowers. They also used a group of bees that had never seen these kinds of fake flowers before. First, the untrained bees sat in a cage and watched for 10 minutes as the trained bees visited one of the two colored flowers. To remove the scent of bees, the scientists then took these flowers away and replaced them with a different set of orange and green fake flowers. And, to prevent the bees from memorizing locations, the scientists arranged the new flowers in a different pattern. Next, the researchers let loose one test bee at a time. Some test bees had watched the demonstrators. Others had not. Both were equally likely to visit orange flowers. This makes sense because bumblebees often visit orange flowers in the wild. Test bees were 50 percent more likely to visit green flowers, however, if they had watched other bees do it first. In a similar experiment, the researchers made fake bees and put them on green flowers, while untrained bees watched. The observer bees were twice as likely to visit green flowers after watching the display than they were before watching it. Green flowers are unusual in nature, so bees probably won't visit them without seeing an example first. Together, the studies have persuaded researchers that bees can learn new behaviors by watching each other. This kind of social learning is common in people and other vertebrates, but these experiments were the first tests on bees. Bumblebees, it turns out, notice a lot more than you might think.E. Sohn

Copybees
Copybees








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