Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Seeds of the Future
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Assembling the Tree of Life
Who's Knocking?
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
Math is a real brain bender
Baby Talk
Birds
Tropical Birds
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Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
An Ancient Spider's Web
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Environment
Shrinking Fish
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Salt and Early Civilization
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Tiger Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
The Essence of Celery
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Play for Science
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A New Touch
Surviving Olympic Heat
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Leeches
Octopuses
Mammals
African Zebra
Polar Bear
Marsupials
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Alligators
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
Icy Red Planet
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Flying the Hyper Skies
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Arctic Melt
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Cool Penguins

Raising a baby takes a lot of work, especially when that baby is a king penguin. Now, it looks like climate change will make life even harder for these birds. A new study suggests that warmer waters could shrink their numbers. Most king penguins live on the Crozet Archipelago, a group of islands in the Indian Ocean, about 1,000 miles north of Antarctica. After the penguin chicks are born in November (which is summer in the Southern Hemisphere), both parents spend 4 months collecting fish, some of which they regurgitate to feed their offspring. When the fish move to deeper waters in March, the adults leave their chicks alone for months. They swim hundreds of miles south. There, near the Antarctic ice, they spend the winter eating seafood, such as squid, to replenish their own energy stores. In October, nearly a year after their chicks were born, the parents return to feed and finish raising them. Scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, have been studying king penguins on the Crozet Archipelago for a decade. Starting in 1998, Yvon Le Maho and colleagues implanted electronic ID tags under the skin of hundreds of penguins. These are the same types of tags you might put in your dog or cat, so you can track them if they get lost. The tags have allowed Le Maho's team to identify individual birds and keep track of details about them, such as how long they live, whether they return from their winter trips, and if their chicks manage to survive the winter. To see whether water temperatures affect the penguins, Le Maho compared his data with temperature records. Ocean surface temperatures vary from year to year. And previous research had shown that fewer squid, fish and other creatures grow when the water is warmer. Le Maho suspected that this drop in the food supply would make it harder for adult penguins to survive the tough times ahead. Indeed, his results showed that fewer adults survived during winters when the water was especially warm. Just a quarter of a degree (0.26°C to be exact) warming of seawater reduces adult penguins' survival by 9 percent in later years. King penguins can live for up to 30 years. And for now, the population still appears healthy. But a warming trend could spell big trouble for a bird that depends on cold and ice.—Emily Sohn

Cool Penguins
Cool Penguins








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