Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Big Squid
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Clone Wars
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
Baby Talk
Flower family knows its roots
Birds
Dodos
Falcons
Doves
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Diamond Glow
Getting the dirt on carbon
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
A Light Delay
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Surf Watch
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
What is groundwater
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Tuna
Bass
Perches
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Building a Food Pyramid
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math is a real brain bender
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Music in the Brain
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Moths
Insects
Dust Mites
Mammals
Beagles
Pitbulls
Beavers
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Speedy stars
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Farms sprout in cities
Springing forward
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Pythons
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Dark Galaxy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Shape Shifting
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Cool Penguins

Raising a baby takes a lot of work, especially when that baby is a king penguin. Now, it looks like climate change will make life even harder for these birds. A new study suggests that warmer waters could shrink their numbers. Most king penguins live on the Crozet Archipelago, a group of islands in the Indian Ocean, about 1,000 miles north of Antarctica. After the penguin chicks are born in November (which is summer in the Southern Hemisphere), both parents spend 4 months collecting fish, some of which they regurgitate to feed their offspring. When the fish move to deeper waters in March, the adults leave their chicks alone for months. They swim hundreds of miles south. There, near the Antarctic ice, they spend the winter eating seafood, such as squid, to replenish their own energy stores. In October, nearly a year after their chicks were born, the parents return to feed and finish raising them. Scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, have been studying king penguins on the Crozet Archipelago for a decade. Starting in 1998, Yvon Le Maho and colleagues implanted electronic ID tags under the skin of hundreds of penguins. These are the same types of tags you might put in your dog or cat, so you can track them if they get lost. The tags have allowed Le Maho's team to identify individual birds and keep track of details about them, such as how long they live, whether they return from their winter trips, and if their chicks manage to survive the winter. To see whether water temperatures affect the penguins, Le Maho compared his data with temperature records. Ocean surface temperatures vary from year to year. And previous research had shown that fewer squid, fish and other creatures grow when the water is warmer. Le Maho suspected that this drop in the food supply would make it harder for adult penguins to survive the tough times ahead. Indeed, his results showed that fewer adults survived during winters when the water was especially warm. Just a quarter of a degree (0.26C to be exact) warming of seawater reduces adult penguins' survival by 9 percent in later years. King penguins can live for up to 30 years. And for now, the population still appears healthy. But a warming trend could spell big trouble for a bird that depends on cold and ice.Emily Sohn

Cool Penguins
Cool Penguins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™