Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Fishy Cleaners
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Fear Matters
Birds
Quails
Mockingbirds
Hummingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
A Spider's Silky Strength
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Computers
Supersonic Splash
Lighting goes digital
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Middle school science adventures
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Coral Gardens
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
A Plankhouse Past
Settling the Americas
Fish
Electric Ray
Electric Eel
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Food for Life
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Setting a Prime Number Record
Math of the World
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Tarantula
Lice
Mammals
Bison
Rodents
Pekingese
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
IceCube Science
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
The Particle Zoo
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
The algae invasion
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Asteroid Lost and Found
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Cool as a Jupiter

Astronomers have found more than 400 planets outside the solar system. These distant worlds are full of surprises: Some are giant and made of gas, like Jupiter, and others seem to be rocky, like big versions of Earth. All these faraway orbs are called exoplanets — short for “extrasolar” planets because they’re outside our solar system — and astronomers find more all the time. Scientists recently found an exoplanet that’s really cool — literally. Most exoplanets are much hotter even than the gas giants in our solar system (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune). But the newly discovered planet, called COROT-9b, is different. Its temperatures don’t soar as high, and as a result it’s probably more like Jupiter and Saturn than other known exoplanets are. (The planet was first spotted by the COROT telescope, which is why “COROT” is in its name.) On COROT-9b, the low temperatures on the surface are around -23º Celsius (-9.4º degrees Fahrenheit) and the highs reach 157 º C (314 º F). COROT-9b is 1,500 light years away. (A light year is the distance light can travel in one year, or about 5.9 trillion miles.) Other planets have been found with lower temperatures, but COROT-9b is special for another reason. It “transits” its star, which means it passes directly between its star and the Earth. Astronomers can learn more about a distant planet that transits than they can about a planet that doesn’t transit. So when a transiting planet shows up, the scientists get excited. Hans Deeg, who worked on the new study of COROT-9b, says this is the first time a cooler planet has been found to transit. Deeg works at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in Tenerife, Spain. Most transiting planets are “weird — inflated and hot,” Didier Queloz, another scientist who worked on the study, told Science News. Queloz works at the Geneva Observatory in Sauverny, Switzerland. As a planet passes in front of its star, it blocks out some light. (This is sort of like a solar eclipse, when the moon passes between the Earth and the Sun.) When astronomers measure the blocked light, they can quickly calculate the size of the planet. They can also learn about the atmosphere of a transiting planet. The light that comes from the star is made of waves — in fact, it’s made of many waves of different wavelengths. Each different wavelength is a different color, even though all together the waves look white. As this light passes through the atmosphere of the exoplanet, different kinds of atoms absorb different wavelengths of light. Eventually that light reaches Earth. By measuring which wavelengths are “missing,” astronomers can figure out which atoms in the atmosphere absorbed the light. Even though COROT-9b is cooler than many other exoplanets, it’s probably not habitable. That means it’s too early to pack your bags because people can’t live there. But, as Sara Seager, an exoplanet expert at MIT, told Science News, if this planet has a rocky moon, there may be hope of finding a new planet to call home. And even if things don’t work out with COROT-9b, there are other worlds to consider, worlds much closer to home. The study of exoplanets is just getting started: hundreds may have been found, but scientists think there are millions of new worlds in our galaxy, just waiting to be discovered. Time to start planet hunting!

Cool as a Jupiter
Cool as a Jupiter








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™