Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Clone Wars
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dino-bite!
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Vultures
Owls
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Pencil Thin
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
The Shape of the Internet
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
South America's sticky tar pits
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Life under Ice
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Environment
Out in the Cold
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Stone Age Sole Survivors
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Marlin
Barracudas
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Teen Brains, Under Construction
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Hermit Crabs
Mussels
Mammals
Foxes
Woolly Mammoths
Elk
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Project Music
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Surprise Visitor
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Copperhead Snakes
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Icy Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Crime Lab
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on the Road, Again
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Catching Some Rays
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Cockroaches

There are roughly 3,500 species of cockroach, in 6 families. Cockroaches exist worldwide, with the exception of the polar regions and in elevations above 6,500 ft. Among the most well-known species are the American cockroach, which is about 3 cm long, and the German cockroach, about 1.5 cm long. Tropical cockroaches are often much bigger. When infesting buildings, cockroaches are considered pests. Versatile eaters: Cockroaches are generally either scavengers or omnivores. The exception to this is the wood eating Cryptocercus species found in China and the United States. Although they are incapable of digesting plant matter, they have a symbiotic relationship with a protozoan that digests the cellulose in plants, allowing them to extract the nutrients. In this, they are similar to termites and current research suggests that the Cryptocercus is more closely related to termites than it is to other cockroaches, making it an evolutionary link between cockroaches and termites. Cockroaches are most common in tropical and subtropical climates. Some species are in close association with human dwellings and widely found around garbage or in the kitchen. Night dwellers: Cockroaches are mainly nocturnal, and will run away when exposed to light. A peculiar exception is the Oriental cockroach which is attracted to light, thus making it a far more annoying pest. Roaches are called the custodians of nature. They only live in houses where there are crumbs to eat or the garbage can is uncovered. They lay eggs inside the house's hollow walls. Super-roach!: The roach is also one of the hardiest insects on the planet, capable of living for a month without food and remaining alive headless for up to a week. It can also hold its breath for 45 minutes and has the ability to slow down its heart rate. Cockroaches also have a very high resistance to radiation. A common urban legend that cockroaches can survive a nuclear attack is in fact true. Cockroaches have been shown to make group decisions. Hansel and Roachel: New research being conducted at the University of Florida shows that cockroaches leave chemical trails in their feces. Other cockroaches will follow these trails to discover sources of food, water, and where other cockroaches are hiding. One of the major implications of this research is a new technique in cockroach pest control. Cockroaches could be potentially removed from a home by leaving a chemical trail that leads away from the home. Female cockroaches are sometimes seen carrying egg cases on the end of their abdomen; the egg case of the German cockroach holds about 30–40 long, thin eggs, packed like frankfurters in the case called an ootheca. The eggs hatch from the combined pressure of the hatchlings gulping air and are initially bright white nymphs that continue inflating themselves with air and harden and darken within about four hours. Their transient white stage while hatching and later while molting has led to many individuals claiming to have seen albino cockroaches. A female German cockroach carries an egg capsule containing around 40 eggs. She drops the capsule prior to hatching. Development from eggs to adults takes 3–4 months. Cockroaches live up to a year. The female may produce up to eight egg cases in a lifetime. In other words, in favorable conditions it can produce 300–400 offspring. A regular cockroach, however, can produce an extremely high number of eggs in her lifetime. She lays up to 100 eggs in each egg sac. She only needs to be impregnated once to be able to lay eggs for the rest of her life, allowing one single cockroach to lay over a million eggs in her lifetime.

Cockroaches
Cockroaches








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™