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Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
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A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
G-Tunes with a Message
Sea Lilies on the Run
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Moon Crash, Splash
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Nonstop Robot
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South America's sticky tar pits
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
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E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Warmest Year on Record
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Rocking the House
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Where rivers run uphill
To Catch a Dragonfly
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Digging Up Stone Age Art
Chicken of the Sea
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Perches
Carp
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A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Essence of Celery
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Bees
Bedbugs
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Weasels
African Mammals
Tasmanian Devil
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Invisibility Ring
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Farms sprout in cities
Surprise Visitor
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Copperhead Snakes
Asp
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Cobras

Cobras are venomous snakes of family Elapidae, of several genera. (Elapidae also include the taipans, brown snakes, tiger snakes, fierce snakes, coral snakes, mambas, and sea snakes.) Cobras generally inhabit tropical and desert regions of Asia and Africa. Look Tough: The cobra's most recognizable feature is its hood, a flap of skin and muscle behind the head which it can flare, perhaps for the purpose of making it appear bigger and more threatening to predators. The cobra's predators include the mongoose and some raptors. DANGER POISON!: Elapidae cannot fold their fangs down, as Viperdae can, so the fangs are generally shorter. They kill their prey, usually small rodents and birds, by injecting a neurotoxin through their hollow fangs. The neurotoxin blocks the synaptic communication between the victim's neurons and muscles, thus stopping movement and control. The King Cobra notably eats other snakes; it feeds almost entirely on other snakes, even venomous ones (ophiophagy). The spitting cobra can also incapacitate larger would-be predators by delivering venom to their eyes. Cobras come in varying colors from black or dark brown to yellowish white. The (jet) black cobra found in Pakistan and North India is considered a sub-species of Indian Cobra (Naja naja). What's your name?: "Cobra" is the Portuguese common name for a snake; it came from late Latin colobra. When Portuguese navigators arrived to the coasts of Africa and South Asia in the 16th century, they named the cobras cobra-capelo, which mean hood-snake; from this compound, the name entered Spanish, French, English, and other European languages.

Cobras
Cobras








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