Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Lives of a Mole Rat
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Living in the Desert
Behavior
Pondering the puzzling platypus
The Science Fair Circuit
Fear Matters
Birds
Condors
Falcons
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
A Light Delay
The memory of a material
Computers
A Light Delay
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Have shell, will travel
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Shrinking Glaciers
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Island of Hope
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Food Web Woes
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Electric Catfish
Mahi-Mahi
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The mercury in that tuna
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
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Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Prime Time for Cicadas
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Cell Phone Tattlers
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Wasps
Roundworms
Mammals
Glider
Siberian Husky
Vampire Bats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Speedy stars
One ring around them all
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
A Change in Leaf Color
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Pythons
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Unveiling Titan
Ready, Set, Supernova
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Young Scientists Take Flight
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Watering the Air
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








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