Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Watching out for vultures
Springing forward
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Firefly Delight
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Wired for Math
Memory by Hypnosis
Birds
Flightless Birds
Pheasants
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
Fingerprint Evidence
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Battling Mastodons
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Sounds and Silence
Improving the Camel
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Stone Age Sole Survivors
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Basking Sharks
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Essence of Celery
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math is a real brain bender
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Spit Power
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Daddy Long Legs
Leeches
Mammals
Elk
Pekingese
Tigers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Electric Backpack
Invisibility Ring
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Getting the dirt on carbon
Springing forward
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Turtles
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Warmest Year on Record
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™