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Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Got Milk? How?
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
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Sea Lilies on the Run
Cacophony Acoustics
Mouse Songs
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Island of Hope
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Sticky Silky Feet
Sugary Survival Skill
The Buzz about Caffeine
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A New Look at Saturn's rings
The Book of Life
New eyes to scan the skies
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Meet the new dinos
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Fossil Forests
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The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
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Snow Traps
Bald Eagles Forever
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Digging Up Stone Age Art
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Mako Sharks
Basking Sharks
Electric Ray
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
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Order of Adjectives
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How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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Setting a Prime Number Record
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A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Butterflies
Camel Spiders
Octopuses
Mammals
Cows
African Ostrich
Cougars
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
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Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Project Music
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Bright Blooms That Glow
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
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Cobras
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Algae Motors
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
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Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








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