Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Toads
Animals
Roboroach and Company
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Jay Watch
Behavior
Sugar-pill medicine
Slumber by the numbers
The Smell of Trust
Birds
Rheas
Turkeys
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
Undercover Detectives
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Atomic Drive
Computers
Middle school science adventures
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
The man who rocked biology to its core
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Coral Gardens
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Sounds and Silence
Flu river
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Puffer Fish
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Deep-space dancers
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Cell Phone Tattlers
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Scorpions
Sponges
Lobsters
Mammals
African Mammals
Coyotes
Glider
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
IceCube Science
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Geckos
Asp
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. An exception is the razor clam, which has an elongate shell that suggests an old-fashioned straight razor. Clams can live up to 150 years old - or perhaps longer (science suspects that some larger quahogs found off the East Coast of the US may be 200 years old). Hard or Soft? Clams can be hard-shelled or soft-shelled, according to the degree of calcification of their shells, according to species. They are eaten raw, steamed, boiled, baked or fried, again (often) according to species. Clam chowder is a popular soup in the U.S. in which clams figure strongly. Floating down the river current... The mating habits of clams varies according to the waters in which they live. In river clams, the male releases sperm into the water and the river current carries it downstream. The female then draws sperm in to fertilize eggs still inside her body. Mating tip to males - stay upstream! Fertilization odds are poor unless the male is upstream of the female. For ocean clams, the male also expels sperm, however the female releases the eggs from her body into the surrounding water. Fertilization occurs only when the eggs float near the sperm. One adult survivor to tens of thousands of babies During a breeding season, a female clam makes tens of thousands of baby clams. Probably only one settles to the bottom and survives to adulthood.

Clams
Clams








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™