Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Making the most of a meal
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Sea Lilies on the Run
Firefly Delight
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Behavior
Babies Prove Sound Learners
How Much Babies Know
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Pigeons
Crows
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Sugary Survival Skill
Picture the Smell
Computers
Music of the Future
The Book of Life
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
Dino Babies
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Long Haul
Fish
Electric Eel
Swordfish
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
The Color of Health
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Wasps
Worms
Mammals
Shih Tzus
Tigers
Beavers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Project Music
Electric Backpack
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Gila Monsters
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
An Earthlike Planet
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Middle school science adventures
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Childhood's Long History

You're lucky. Compared to other animals, you get to be a kid for a long time before you have to strike off on your own. Recent studies suggest that people have been enjoying long childhoods for many thousands of years. Some of this research has focused on several human teeth found in Morocco in 1968. On the basis of earlier studies of the molecules in these teeth, scientists estimate that their owner lived 160,000 years ago. In more recent studies of the Moroccan fossil, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, looked at a molar (back tooth), a front tooth that was just starting to grow, and a canine (sharp, pointed side tooth) that hadn't yet broken through the gums. The researchers used a new X-ray technique to study these teeth and the hard substance called enamel that covers them. As kids grow, new layers of enamel form on their teeth every 7 to 9 days. Growing teeth also develop growth rings that are similar to the growth rings in tree trunks. By counting layers and rings in fossil teeth, scientists can tell how old the teeth—and the child who owned them—were. Using the new X-ray technique, the German scientists could count the layers and examine growth rings without damaging the teeth. In the past, scientists had to cut open teeth to count enamel layers and rings. Results showed that the teeth belonged to a child who was 7 years, 10 months, old when he or she died. The fossil teeth looked just like the teeth of a modern 7-year-old. That suggests that kids who lived 160,000 years ago grew at about the same rate as modern kids do. "The [new] study pushes back clear evidence for humanlike growth to 160,000 years ago," remarks anthropologist B. Holly Smith of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. In another study, a different group of scientists used a similar X-ray technique to look at the molars of Neandertals who lived 127,000 years ago. These teeth also appeared to grow like ours do. Next, scientists want to use the new X-ray method to analyze even older tooth fossils. Recent evidence suggests that childhoods started to get longer around 1.6 million years ago in an ancestral human species called Homo erectus. Our species, Homo sapiens, didn't exist until about 200,000 years ago. Childhood has a long history. Enjoy yours while you can!—E. Sohn

Childhood's Long History
Childhood's Long History








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™