Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
The History of Meow
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Big Squid
Behavior
Memory by Hypnosis
Between a rock and a wet place
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Birds
Lovebirds
Macaws
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Supergoo to the rescue
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Programming with Alice
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
South America's sticky tar pits
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Earth from the inside out
Deep History
Environment
What is groundwater
Sounds and Silence
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Salmon
Basking Sharks
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
A New Touch
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Dust Mites
Centipedes
Mammals
Guinea Pigs
Dalmatians
Weasels
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
One ring around them all
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Road Bumps
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Underwater Jungles
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Cobras
Komodo Dragons
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Algae Motors
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

 

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs?

A team of scientists from Scotland says yes. They’ve engineered special chickens that lay eggs with disease-treating drugs inside.

These drugs are made of molecules called proteins. Animals make thousands of proteins—they’re the main ingredient in skin, hair, milk, and meat. Since animals can make proteins easily, they’re good candidates for making protein drugs.

Researchers have already made cows, sheep, and goats that pump out protein drugs in their milk. But chickens are cheaper to take care of, need less room, and grow faster than these other animals. Those qualities could make chickens a better choice to become living drug factories, says Simon Lillico of the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, Scotland.

Lillico and a team of researchers changed chickens’ DNA—the code that tells cells how to make proteins—so that the birds’ cells made two protein drugs. One drug can treat skin cancer, and the other treats a nerve disease called multiple sclerosis.

The scientists altered the chickens’ DNA so that the birds made these drugs only in their egg whites. This protects the chickens’ bodies from the drugs’ possible harmful effects and makes it easy for scientists to collect the drugs.

These special chickens can pass on their drug-laying abilities to their chicks. So far, the Scottish researchers have bred five generations of drug-producing birds.

The scientists need to improve these chickens before they roost in drug companies’ labs. The birds don’t make enough drugs to treat people yet. But once the researchers perfect their technique, you might eventually take your medicine sunny-side up.—C. Brownlee

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™