Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Middle school science adventures
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Mouse Songs
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Behavior
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
A Recipe for Happiness
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Birds
Mockingbirds
Quails
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
The newest superheavy in town
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Fossil Forests
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Petrified Lightning
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Shrinking Fish
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Words of the Distant Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Dogfish
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Deep-space dancers
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Hear, Hear
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Octopuses
Earthworms
Mammals
Primates
Weasels
Jaguars
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Speedy stars
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Getting the dirt on carbon
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Alligators
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Revving Up Green Machines
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Where rivers run uphill
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

 

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs?

A team of scientists from Scotland says yes. They’ve engineered special chickens that lay eggs with disease-treating drugs inside.

These drugs are made of molecules called proteins. Animals make thousands of proteins—they’re the main ingredient in skin, hair, milk, and meat. Since animals can make proteins easily, they’re good candidates for making protein drugs.

Researchers have already made cows, sheep, and goats that pump out protein drugs in their milk. But chickens are cheaper to take care of, need less room, and grow faster than these other animals. Those qualities could make chickens a better choice to become living drug factories, says Simon Lillico of the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, Scotland.

Lillico and a team of researchers changed chickens’ DNA—the code that tells cells how to make proteins—so that the birds’ cells made two protein drugs. One drug can treat skin cancer, and the other treats a nerve disease called multiple sclerosis.

The scientists altered the chickens’ DNA so that the birds made these drugs only in their egg whites. This protects the chickens’ bodies from the drugs’ possible harmful effects and makes it easy for scientists to collect the drugs.

These special chickens can pass on their drug-laying abilities to their chicks. So far, the Scottish researchers have bred five generations of drug-producing birds.

The scientists need to improve these chickens before they roost in drug companies’ labs. The birds don’t make enough drugs to treat people yet. But once the researchers perfect their technique, you might eventually take your medicine sunny-side up.—C. Brownlee

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™