Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Springing forward
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Clone Wars
Behavior
Honeybees do the wave
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Finches
Songbirds
Crows
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Sugary Survival Skill
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
The science of disappearing
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
If Only Bones Could Speak
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Marlin
Electric Eel
Bass
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Healing Honey
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Shrimps
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Basset Hounds
Bats
Bonobos
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Anacondas
Pythons
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
An Icy Blob of Fluff
World of Three Suns
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Searching for Alien Life
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Arctic Melt
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, or AAAS. Gage's car is unusual: It's a plug-in electric car. Right now, most cars run on gasoline. Others, called hybrids, use a combination of gas and electricity — electricity provided by heavy-duty batteries in the car. And carmakers are racing to build an affordable all-electric car that both makes people happy and keeps the car companies in business. (Gage is president of AC Propulsion, a company that works on electric cars, so he has a head start.) His car is unusual for another reason: When he’s not driving it, he can plug it into a special meter that is connected to the grid. “The grid” is the network of power cables and power stations all over the United States that provide electricity to anyone in a particular place. With most outlets — such as the ones in your home — electricity comes out and provides power. When Gage's car is plugged in to its special meter or outlet, electricity can go in the opposite way you might expect. Instead of coming out to charge the batteries, electricity can go in. The batteries can send power to the grid. When you plug something in —a toaster, say — it needs electricity to perform its function. But when many people are all using power at the same time, the grid has to supply higher-than-normal amounts of electricity. Ideally, power companies would have some electricity stored and on hand for busy times. But storing electricity for long periods of time is difficult and expensive. In order to get electricity to everyone who wants it during these busy times, a power company may need to spend money to buy new batteries or even to build power stations if demand is going to remain high. The people who use electricity ultimately pay these extra costs. Gage’s idea is that if enough people use cars like his, their batteries can be used to give the grid an extra boost. And when the demand slows down, the grid can recharge the batteries in the cars. So someone who parks an electric car at one of these meters may not even notice a difference in the battery supply. Over the course of a day, the batteries “will have charged and discharged just the same amount,” Ken Huber told the audience at AAAS. Huber works at PJM Interconnection, a company involved with the buying and selling of electricity among different parts of the grid. By leasing their car batteries to the grid, Gage says, people can earn money — maybe even $5 to $10 per day. While Gage talked to the scientists and reporters at the meeting, his car was plugged into the grid. A computer display showed how much power was being shuffled between the car and the grid over time. The idea of this vehicle-to-grid system, or V2G, has been around for at least a decade, and mathematicians and economists have been figuring out how V2G could be profitable and energy-efficient. However, there are still some problems that need to be figured out. Right now, it costs about $500 to adapt a car to share its battery power with the grid — a hefty price to pay to share power. Plus, the grid would need to know when the cars’ batteries are available for charging — which means people would have to work one more thing into their schedules. Still, ideas such as Gage's are a glimpse of the future, where creative scientists and engineers will have to find ways to help avoid a full-fledged energy crisis.

Charged cars that would charge
Charged cars that would charge








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™