Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Insect Stowaways
Cannibal Crickets
Firefly Delight
Behavior
The Smell of Trust
Dino-bite!
Pain Expectations
Birds
Roadrunners
Seagulls
Doves
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
A Framework for Growing Bone
Lighting goes digital
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
An Ancient Spider's Web
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Greener Diet
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Plastic Meals for Seals
Flu river
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Meet your mysterious relative
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Play for Science
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Spit Power
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Leeches
Mollusks
Mammals
Wildcats
Seal
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Fast-flying fungal spores
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Anacondas
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Planning for Mars
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Cell Phone Tattlers

Your cell phone holds secrets about you. Besides the names and numbers that you've programmed into it, traces of your DNA linger on the device, according to a new study. DNA is genetic material that appears in every cell. Like your fingerprint, your DNA is unique to you—unless you have an identical twin. Scientists today routinely analyze DNA in blood, saliva, or hair left behind at the scene of a crime. The results often help detectives identify criminals and their victims. Meghan J. McFadden, a molecular biologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, heard about a crime in which the suspect bled onto a cell phone and later dropped the device. This made her wonder whether traces of DNA lingered on cell phones—even when no blood was involved. To find out, she and a colleague collected flip-style phones from 10 volunteers. They used swabs to collect invisible traces of the users from two parts of the phone: the outside, where the user holds it, and the speaker, which is placed at the user's ear. The scientists scrubbed the phones using a solution made mostly of alcohol. The aim of washing was to remove all detectable traces of DNA. The owners got their phones back for another week. Then the researchers collected the phones and repeated the swabbing of each phone once more. The scientists discovered DNA that belonged to the phone's owner on each of the phones. Better samples were collected from the outside of each phone, but those swabs also picked up DNA that belonged to other people who had apparently also handled the phone. Surprisingly, DNA showed up even in swabs that were taken immediately after the phones were scrubbed. That suggests that washing won't remove all traces of evidence from a criminal's device. So cell phones can now be added to the list of clues that can clinch a crime-scene investigation.—Emily Sohn

Cell Phone Tattlers
Cell Phone Tattlers








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