Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Mouse Songs
A Tongue and a Half
A Wild Ferret Rise
Behavior
Wired for Math
Surprise Visitor
Video Game Violence
Birds
Pigeons
Waterfowl
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Atom Hauler
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
Music of the Future
The Book of Life
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Surf Watch
Greener Diet
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Shrinking Fish
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Childhood's Long History
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Perches
Puffer Fish
Salmon
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
A Taste for Cheese
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math of the World
Human Body
Heart Revival
The tell-tale bacteria
Hear, Hear
Invertebrates
Snails
Ants
Lobsters
Mammals
African Hippopotamus
African Mammals
Shih Tzus
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Project Music
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Komodo Dragons
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Change in Climate
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Cell Phone Tattlers

Your cell phone holds secrets about you. Besides the names and numbers that you've programmed into it, traces of your DNA linger on the device, according to a new study. DNA is genetic material that appears in every cell. Like your fingerprint, your DNA is unique to you—unless you have an identical twin. Scientists today routinely analyze DNA in blood, saliva, or hair left behind at the scene of a crime. The results often help detectives identify criminals and their victims. Meghan J. McFadden, a molecular biologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, heard about a crime in which the suspect bled onto a cell phone and later dropped the device. This made her wonder whether traces of DNA lingered on cell phones—even when no blood was involved. To find out, she and a colleague collected flip-style phones from 10 volunteers. They used swabs to collect invisible traces of the users from two parts of the phone: the outside, where the user holds it, and the speaker, which is placed at the user's ear. The scientists scrubbed the phones using a solution made mostly of alcohol. The aim of washing was to remove all detectable traces of DNA. The owners got their phones back for another week. Then the researchers collected the phones and repeated the swabbing of each phone once more. The scientists discovered DNA that belonged to the phone's owner on each of the phones. Better samples were collected from the outside of each phone, but those swabs also picked up DNA that belonged to other people who had apparently also handled the phone. Surprisingly, DNA showed up even in swabs that were taken immediately after the phones were scrubbed. That suggests that washing won't remove all traces of evidence from a criminal's device. So cell phones can now be added to the list of clues that can clinch a crime-scene investigation.—Emily Sohn

Cell Phone Tattlers
Cell Phone Tattlers








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™