Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Awake at Night
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Behavior
Pipefish power from mom
Lightening Your Mood
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Cranes
Swans
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
A Big, Weird Dino
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
To Catch a Dragonfly
A Change in Leaf Color
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Stonehenge Settlement
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Tuna
Sturgeons
Freshwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Attacking Asthma
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Daddy Long Legs
Crustaceans
Mammals
Platypus
African Elephants
Chimpanzees
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
One ring around them all
Project Music
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Anacondas
Box Turtles
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
World of Three Suns
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Dancing with Robots
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Arctic Melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Carnivorous Birds

The ducks paddling around and scooping up breadcrumbs are harmless enough, but not all birds are so docile. Carnivorous birds -- often called raptors -- make up a large portion of all bird species. Eagles, hawks, falcons and others are active hunters, eating everything from fish, to rodents, to carrion, to other birds. Identifiable by their sharp beaks and talons (or claws) specially adapted to grasping prey, hunting birds make it easy to see where scientests have drawn a parallel between birds and their ancestors, the dinosaurs. A bird of prey, or raptor, is a bird that hunts its food using its curved beak and talons. They also generally have sexual dimorphism and excellent vision. Nocturnal birds of prey (the owls) are separate from the diurnal families, and are in the order Strigiformes. Although the term "raptor" is sometimes used more broadly, in generally it includes owls, as they too are carnivorous birds, preying on mice and other small animals. Although other groups may fill similar ecological roles and sometimes appear closely related on first sight, this is largely because of convergent evolution. Many terms are used to describe particular types of birds of prey, both by specialists and lay people, in ways that vary a good deal. Eagles are large raptors with long, broad wings and massive legs. Booted eagles have feathered legs and build large stick nests. (Non-specialists often use the term very broadly, to indicate almost any raptor.) Kites are raptors with long wings and weak legs which spend a great deal of time soaring. In general they take live prey but mostly feed on carrion. Falcons are small to medium sized birds of prey with long pointed wings. Unlike most other raptors, they belong to the Falconidae rather than the Accipitridae. Many are particularly swift flyers. Instead of building their own nests, falcons appropriate old nests of other birds. Sometimes they lay their eggs on cliff ledges or in tree hollows. Harriers are large, slender hawk-like birds with long tails and long, thin legs. Most hunt by gliding and circling low over grasslands and marshes on their long, broad wings. Hawks are medium-sized birds of prey that belong to the genus Accipiter. They are mainly woodland birds that hunt by sudden dashes from a concealed perch. They usually have long tails and high visual acuity. Buzzards are wide-ranging raptors with a robust body and broad wings, or, alternatively, any bird of the genus Buteo (also commonly known as Hawks in North America. Other birds are opportunistic omnivores and, although their diet may consist of meat when the meal presents itself (as with roadkill), they are not technically considered strictly carnivorous birds.

Carnivorous Birds
Carnivorous Birds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™