Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Eyes on the Depths
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
The Science Fair Circuit
Mice sense each other's fear
Eating Troubles
Birds
Flightless Birds
Kiwis
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Atomic Drive
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Troubles with Hubble
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
A Dino King's Ancestor
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Springing forward
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Environment
Spotty Survival
Food Web Woes
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Early Maya Writing
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
Tuna
Halibut
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Packing Fat
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Dreaming makes perfect
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Caterpillars
Flies
Mammals
Quolls
Bobcats
Primates
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
IceCube Science
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
A Giant Flower's New Family
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Geckos
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Algae Motors
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Arctic Melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Capitalization Rules

Rule 1

Capitalize the first word of a quoted sentence.

Examples:
He said, "Treat her as you would your own daughter."
"Look out!" she screamed. "You almost ran into my child."

Rule 2

Capitalize a proper noun.

Example:
Golden Gate Bridge

Rule 3

Capitalize a person's title when it precedes the name. Do not capitalize when the title is acting as a description following the name.

Examples:
Chairperson Anderson
Mr. Anderson, the chairperson of the company, will address us at noon.

Rule 4

Capitalize the person's title when it follows the name on the address or signature line.

Example:
Sincerely,
Mr. Anderson, Chairperson

Rule 5

Capitalize the titles of high-ranking government officials when used before their names. Do not capitalize the civil title if it is used instead of the name.

Examples:
The prime minister will address Parlament.
All senators are expected to attend.
The ministers, junior ministers, and attorneys general called for a special task force.
Minister Charles, Governor Poppins, Attorney General Dalloway, and Senators James and Twain will attend.

Rule 6

Capitalize any title when used as a direct address.

Example:
Will you take my temperature, Doctor?

Rule 7

Capitalize points of the compass only when they refer to specific regions.

Examples:
We have had three relatives visit from the South.
Go south three blocks and then turn left.
We live in the southeast section of town.
Southeast is just an adjective here describing section, so it should not be capitalized.

Rule 8

Always capitalize the first and last words of titles of publications regardless of their parts of speech. Capitalize other words within titles, including the short verb forms Is, Are, and Be.

Exception:
Do not capitalize little words within titles such as a, an, the, but, as, if, and, or, nor, or prepositions, regardless of their length.

Examples:
The Day of the Jackal
What Color Is Your Parachute?
A Tale of Two Cities

Rule 9

Capitalize federal or state when used as part of an official agency name or in government documents where these terms represent an official name. If they are being used as general terms, you may use lowercase letters.

Examples:
The state has evidence to the contrary.
That is a federal offense.
The State Board of Equalization collects sales taxes.
We will visit three states during our summer vacation.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has been subject to much scrutiny and criticism lately.
Her business must comply with all county, state, and federal laws.

Rule 10

You may capitalize words such as department, bureau, and office if you have prepared your text in the following way:

Example:
The Bureau of Land Management (Bureau) has some jurisdiction over Indian lands. The Bureau is finding its administrative role to be challenging.

Rule 11

Do not capitalize names of seasons.

Example:
I love autumn colors and spring flowers.

Rule 12

Capitalize the first word of a salutation and the first word of a complimentary close.

Examples:
Dear Ms. Mohamed: 
My dear Mr. Sanchez: 
Very truly yours,

Rule 13

Capitalize words derived from proper nouns.

Example:
I must take English and math.
English is capitalized because it comes from the proper noun England, but math does not come from Mathland.

Rule 14

Capitalize the names of specific course titles.

Example:
I must take history and Algebra 2.

Rule 15

After a sentence ending with a colon, do not capitalize the first word if it begins a list.

Example:
These are my favorite foods: chocolate cake, spaghetti, and artichokes.

Rule 16

Do not capitalize when only one sentence follows a sentence ending with a colon.

Example:
I love Jane Smiley's writing: her book, A Thousand Acres, was beautiful.

Rule 17

Capitalize when two or more sentences follow a sentence ending with a colon.

Example:
I love Jane Smiley's writing: Her book, A Thousand Acres, was beautiful. Also, Moo was clever.

 










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