Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Lives of a Mole Rat
Poor Devils
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Listening to Birdsong
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Woodpecker
Rheas
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
Hair Detectives
Batteries built by Viruses
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Battling Mastodons
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Island of Hope
Environment
Sounds and Silence
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Settling the Americas
Fish
Electric Ray
Lungfish
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Prime Time for Cicadas
Detecting True Art
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Beetles
Dragonflies
Scorpions
Mammals
African Elephants
Giraffes
African Gorillas
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Fastest Plant on Earth
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Anacondas
Copperhead Snakes
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Return to Space
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Capitalization Rules

Rule 1

Capitalize the first word of a quoted sentence.

Examples:
He said, "Treat her as you would your own daughter."
"Look out!" she screamed. "You almost ran into my child."

Rule 2

Capitalize a proper noun.

Example:
Golden Gate Bridge

Rule 3

Capitalize a person's title when it precedes the name. Do not capitalize when the title is acting as a description following the name.

Examples:
Chairperson Anderson
Mr. Anderson, the chairperson of the company, will address us at noon.

Rule 4

Capitalize the person's title when it follows the name on the address or signature line.

Example:
Sincerely,
Mr. Anderson, Chairperson

Rule 5

Capitalize the titles of high-ranking government officials when used before their names. Do not capitalize the civil title if it is used instead of the name.

Examples:
The prime minister will address Parlament.
All senators are expected to attend.
The ministers, junior ministers, and attorneys general called for a special task force.
Minister Charles, Governor Poppins, Attorney General Dalloway, and Senators James and Twain will attend.

Rule 6

Capitalize any title when used as a direct address.

Example:
Will you take my temperature, Doctor?

Rule 7

Capitalize points of the compass only when they refer to specific regions.

Examples:
We have had three relatives visit from the South.
Go south three blocks and then turn left.
We live in the southeast section of town.
Southeast is just an adjective here describing section, so it should not be capitalized.

Rule 8

Always capitalize the first and last words of titles of publications regardless of their parts of speech. Capitalize other words within titles, including the short verb forms Is, Are, and Be.

Exception:
Do not capitalize little words within titles such as a, an, the, but, as, if, and, or, nor, or prepositions, regardless of their length.

Examples:
The Day of the Jackal
What Color Is Your Parachute?
A Tale of Two Cities

Rule 9

Capitalize federal or state when used as part of an official agency name or in government documents where these terms represent an official name. If they are being used as general terms, you may use lowercase letters.

Examples:
The state has evidence to the contrary.
That is a federal offense.
The State Board of Equalization collects sales taxes.
We will visit three states during our summer vacation.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has been subject to much scrutiny and criticism lately.
Her business must comply with all county, state, and federal laws.

Rule 10

You may capitalize words such as department, bureau, and office if you have prepared your text in the following way:

Example:
The Bureau of Land Management (Bureau) has some jurisdiction over Indian lands. The Bureau is finding its administrative role to be challenging.

Rule 11

Do not capitalize names of seasons.

Example:
I love autumn colors and spring flowers.

Rule 12

Capitalize the first word of a salutation and the first word of a complimentary close.

Examples:
Dear Ms. Mohamed: 
My dear Mr. Sanchez: 
Very truly yours,

Rule 13

Capitalize words derived from proper nouns.

Example:
I must take English and math.
English is capitalized because it comes from the proper noun England, but math does not come from Mathland.

Rule 14

Capitalize the names of specific course titles.

Example:
I must take history and Algebra 2.

Rule 15

After a sentence ending with a colon, do not capitalize the first word if it begins a list.

Example:
These are my favorite foods: chocolate cake, spaghetti, and artichokes.

Rule 16

Do not capitalize when only one sentence follows a sentence ending with a colon.

Example:
I love Jane Smiley's writing: her book, A Thousand Acres, was beautiful.

Rule 17

Capitalize when two or more sentences follow a sentence ending with a colon.

Example:
I love Jane Smiley's writing: Her book, A Thousand Acres, was beautiful. Also, Moo was clever.

 










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