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Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
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Little Beetle, Big Horns
Young Ants in the Kitchen
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Video Game Violence
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Diamond Glow
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Earth Rocks On
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Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
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Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
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White Tip Sharks
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How Super Are Superfruits?
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Deep-space dancers
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Dreaming makes perfect
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Ticks
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
The Particle Zoo
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Sweet, Sticky Science
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
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Space and Astronomy
Dark Galaxy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Reach for the Sky
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
A Change in Climate
Watering the Air
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders are also called wind scorpions and sun spiders. Most live in tropical or semitropical regions where they inhabit warm and arid habitats, but some species have been known to live in grassland or forest habitats. The most distinctive feature of Solifugae is their large mouth pinscers. Camel spiders are mostly nocturnal, and seek shade during the day. It was this behavior which led coalition soldiers in the 2003 invasion of Iraq to think these arachnids were attacking them. In reality, they were merely moving toward the newly available shade provided by the soldiers' presence. The absence of shade sends them away. They are the subject of many myths and exaggerations about their size, speed, behaviour, appetite, and lethality. They are not especially large, the biggest having a legspan of perhaps 5 inches, and although they are fast on land compared to other invertebrates (the fastest can run perhaps 10 miles per hour), members of this order of Arachnidae apparently have no venom and do not spin webs. In the Middle East, it is common belief among American soldiers stationed there that camel spiders will feed on living human flesh. The story goes that the creature will inject some anaesthetizing venom into the exposed skin of its sleeping victim, then feed voraciously, leaving the victim to awaken with a gaping wound. Camel spiders, however, do not produce such an anaesthetic, and, like most creatures with any sort of survival instinct, they do not attack prey larger than themselves unless threatened. Due to their bizarre appearance and the fact that they produce a hissing sound when they feel threatened, many people are startled or even afraid of them. However, the greatest threat they pose to humans is their bite in self-defense when one tries to handle them. There is no chance of death directly caused by the bite, but, due to the strong muscles of their chelicerae, they can produce a proportionately large, ragged wound which is prone to infection. Reproduction can involve direct or indirect sperm transfer; when indirect, the male emits a spermatophore on the ground and then inserts it in the female's genital pore.

Camel Spiders
Camel Spiders








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