Agriculture
Silkís superpowers
Springing forward
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Walktopus
Missing Moose
A Tongue and a Half
Behavior
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Body clocks
Pain Expectations
Birds
Kookaburras
A Meal Plan for Birds
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
The memory of a material
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Music of the Future
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
A Global Warming Flap
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
What is groundwater
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Salmon
Goldfish
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
The Color of Health
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Heart Revival
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Crabs
Giant Clam
Bees
Mammals
Hamsters
Horses
Beagles
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
One ring around them all
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Making the most of a meal
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Pythons
Sea Turtles
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Icy Red Planet
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Bionic Bacteria
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Calculating crime

When you think about math, you probably donít think about breaking the law, solving mysteries or finding criminals. But a mathematician in Maryland does, and he has come up with mathematical tools to help police find crooks. People who solve crimes look for patterns that might reveal the identity of the criminal. Itís long been believed, for example, that crooks will break the law closer to where they live, simply because itís easier to get around in your own neighborhood. If police see a pattern of robberies in a certain area, they may look for a suspect who lives near the crime scenes. So, the farther away from the area a crime takes place, the less likely it is that the same criminal did it. But Mike OíLeary, a mathematician at Towson University in Maryland, says that this kind of approach may be too simple. He says that police may get better clues to the location of an offenderís home base by combining these patterns with a cityís layout and historical crime records. The records of past crimes contain geographical information and can reveal easy targets ó that is, the kind of stores that might be less difficult to rob. Because these stores are along roads, the locations of past crimes contain information about where major streets and intersections are. OíLeary is writing a new computer program that will quickly provide this kind of information for a given city. His program also includes census, or survey, information about the people who live in the city, and information about how a criminalís patterns change with age. (Itís been shown, for example, that the younger the criminal, the closer to home the crime.) Other computer programmers have worked on similar software, but OíLearyís uses more math. The mathematician plans to make his computer program available, free of charge, to police departments around the country. The program is just one way to use math to fight crime. OíLeary says that criminology ó the study of crime and criminals ó contains a lot of good math problems. ďI feel like I'm in a gold mine and I'm the only one who knows what gold looks like," he says. ďItís a lot of fun.Ē

Calculating crime
Calculating crime








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™