Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Getting the dirt on carbon
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Crocodile Hearts
Mouse Songs
Behavior
Mice sense each other's fear
Fear Matters
Mosquito duets
Birds
Rheas
Pelicans
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
When frog gender flips
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Play for Science
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Power of the Wind
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Inspired by Nature
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Writing on eggshells
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Basking Sharks
Seahorses
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
A Taste for Cheese
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math Naturals
Human Body
Spit Power
Sun Screen
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Nautiluses
Shrimps
Termites
Mammals
Wildcats
Asian Elephants
Baboons
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
One ring around them all
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Seeds of the Future
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Garter Snakes
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Asteroid Moons
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Dancing with Robots
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on a Rocky Road
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Catching Some Rays
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Burst Busters

Explosions on Earth are a pretty big deal. In outer space, though, things are blowing up all the time. Two new studies show that a particularly powerful type of explosion is 10 times as common, but not always as powerful, as astronomers had thought. The explosions are called gamma-ray bursts. One seems to appear whenever a dying star collapses and becomes a spinning black hole or neutron star. Particles burst out of a doughnut-shaped disk that surrounds the collapsed star, producing gamma rays. A leading theory proposes that all gamma-ray bursts have the same amount of energy. In that case, the energy we detect here on Earth mostly depends on how far away the explosion is and how much of the blast is aimed in our direction. New data cast doubt on that assumption. On Dec. 3, 2003, a European satellite called INTEGRAL recorded an unusual gamma-ray burst officially labeled GRB 031203. Two teams, one from Russia and one from California, looked closely at the data. They found that the burst happened in a galaxy that is relatively close to us, just 1.3 billion light-years away. Oddly, though, it had only about one-thousandth as much energy as do bursts that come from much farther away. Analysis of the afterglow confirmed that the burst was a low-energy event. Astronomers might be missing many gamma-ray bursts because they've been looking only for high-energy explosions, the researchers say. In October, the scheduled launch of a satellite called Swift might help resolve the issue. Swift is designed to register fainter bursts than telescopes on Earth normally detect.E. Sohn

Burst Busters
Burst Busters








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™