Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Springing forward
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Walktopus
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Behavior
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Seeing red means danger ahead
Birds
Owls
Dodos
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Bandages that could bite back
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
Meet your mysterious relative
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Life under Ice
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
A Change in Time
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
The Taming of the Cat
Childhood's Long History
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Tuna
Salmon
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Foul Play?
Heart Revival
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Nautiluses
Scorpions
Beetles
Mammals
Tigers
Marmots
African Hyenas
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
IceCube Science
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
The algae invasion
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Cousin Earth
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Slip Sliming Away
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Warmest Year on Record
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Bright Blooms That Glow

The screaming pinks, blazing oranges, neon reds, and acid greens of many posters and signs owe their brightness to the way those materials are affected by light. The secret to these bright colors is called fluorescence. A material, such as a pigment, fluoresces if it absorbs light of a certain wavelength and then, in turn, gives off light of a longer wavelength. For example, it might absorb ultraviolet light (black light), which is invisible to the human eye, and give off an eerie, greenish glow. Now, researchers have found that four-o'clocks, portulacas, and certain other flashy flowers glow, too. These are the first flowers that anyone has found that naturally glow within the range of light that people can see, says a team of Spanish scientists. A few other types of flowers give off ultraviolet light. These visibly glowing flowers owe their brightness to pigments called betaxanthins. The Spanish researchers found that blue light causes betaxanthins to glow yellowish-green. So, the parts of the flower that look yellow also emit green fluorescent light. Four o'clocks also have a violet pigment called betanin in some places, the scientists found. Betanin works as an anti-fluorescent by absorbing most of the fluorescent light that the betaxanthins emit. The pattern of fluorescence and non-fluorescence might help attract bees and other insects that pollinate the flowers, the scientists suggest. Attracting pollinators can't be the only explanation, though, because the effect appears to be weak. It's also possible that betaxanthins help protect the flowers from stress in their environment.E. Sohn

Bright Blooms That Glow
Bright Blooms That Glow








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™