Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Fast-flying fungal spores
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Cool Penguins
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Behavior
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Taking a Spill for Science
How Much Babies Know
Birds
Finches
Rheas
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
The man who rocked biology to its core
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Unnatural Disasters
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Pollution Detective
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Settling the Americas
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Trout
Lampreys
Eels
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Packing Fat
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
Gut Microbes and Weight
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Corals
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Tasmanian Devil
Elk
African Hippopotamus
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Einstein's Skateboard
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Springing forward
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Tortoises
Boa Constrictors
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Riding Sunlight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Blue Jays

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a North American jay, a handsome bird with lavender-blue to mid-blue feathering from the top of the head to midway down the back. There is a pronounced crest on the head. The colour changes to black, sky-blue and white barring on the wing primaries and the tail. The bird has an off-white underside, with a black collar around the neck and sides of the head and a white face. Range: Blue Jays reside over a very large area on North America's east coast, from Newfoundland in the northeast to Florida in the southeast and westward to Texas and the mid-west and eastern Colorado in the north. It is mainly a bird of mixed woodland, including American beech and various oak species, but also of parks and gardens in some towns and cities. West of the Rockies, it is replaced by the closely related Steller's Jay. Although this bird is generally found year round through most of its range, some northern birds do move into the southern parts of the range. These birds migrate during the day. Diet: The Blue Jay searches for food on the ground and in trees, and has a varied diet, including acorns and beech mast, weed seeds, grain, fruits and other berries, peanuts, bread, meat, eggs and nestlings, small invertebrates of many types, scraps in town parks and bird-table food. Behavior: Its aggressive behavior at feeding stations as well as its reputation for occasionally destroying the nests and eggs of other birds has made the Blue Jay unwelcome at some bird feeders. Blue Jay Call: The Blue Jay’s call is typical of most jays that it is varied, but the most common sound is usually the alarm call, which is a loud, almost gull-like scream. There is also a high-pitched jayer-jayer call that increases in speed as the bird becomes more agitated. The Color Blue: As with other blue-hued birds, the Blue Jay's coloration is not derived from pigments, but is the result of light refraction due to the internal structure of the feathers; if a blue jay feather is crushed, the blue-ness disappears as the structure is destroyed. This is referred to as structural coloration. Any suitable tree or large bush may be used for nesting and both sexes build the nest and rear the young, though only the female broods them. There are usually 4-5 eggs laid and incubated over 16-18 days. The young are fledged usually between 17-21 days. Blue Jays typically form monogamous pair bonds for life.

Blue Jays
Blue Jays








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™