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Blue Jays

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a North American jay, a handsome bird with lavender-blue to mid-blue feathering from the top of the head to midway down the back. There is a pronounced crest on the head. The colour changes to black, sky-blue and white barring on the wing primaries and the tail. The bird has an off-white underside, with a black collar around the neck and sides of the head and a white face. Range: Blue Jays reside over a very large area on North America's east coast, from Newfoundland in the northeast to Florida in the southeast and westward to Texas and the mid-west and eastern Colorado in the north. It is mainly a bird of mixed woodland, including American beech and various oak species, but also of parks and gardens in some towns and cities. West of the Rockies, it is replaced by the closely related Steller's Jay. Although this bird is generally found year round through most of its range, some northern birds do move into the southern parts of the range. These birds migrate during the day. Diet: The Blue Jay searches for food on the ground and in trees, and has a varied diet, including acorns and beech mast, weed seeds, grain, fruits and other berries, peanuts, bread, meat, eggs and nestlings, small invertebrates of many types, scraps in town parks and bird-table food. Behavior: Its aggressive behavior at feeding stations as well as its reputation for occasionally destroying the nests and eggs of other birds has made the Blue Jay unwelcome at some bird feeders. Blue Jay Call: The Blue Jay’s call is typical of most jays that it is varied, but the most common sound is usually the alarm call, which is a loud, almost gull-like scream. There is also a high-pitched jayer-jayer call that increases in speed as the bird becomes more agitated. The Color Blue: As with other blue-hued birds, the Blue Jay's coloration is not derived from pigments, but is the result of light refraction due to the internal structure of the feathers; if a blue jay feather is crushed, the blue-ness disappears as the structure is destroyed. This is referred to as structural coloration. Any suitable tree or large bush may be used for nesting and both sexes build the nest and rear the young, though only the female broods them. There are usually 4-5 eggs laid and incubated over 16-18 days. The young are fledged usually between 17-21 days. Blue Jays typically form monogamous pair bonds for life.

Blue Jays
Blue Jays








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