Agriculture
Springing forward
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
Walks on the Wild Side
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Lightening Your Mood
Listen and Learn
Math Naturals
Birds
Cardinals
Crows
Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Music of the Future
Picture the Smell
Computers
Small but WISE
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Great Quake Coming?
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Change in Climate
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
A Long Haul
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Piranha
Hammerhead Sharks
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Eat Out, Eat Smart
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
It's a Math World for Animals
Math of the World
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Termites
Moths
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Boxers
St. Bernards
Raccoons
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
IceCube Science
Powering Ball Lightning
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Snakes
Copperhead Snakes
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
Sounds of Titan
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Ready, unplug, drive
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Black Mamba

The Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is the largest venomous snake in Africa, with an average length around 8 feet (2.5 m), but may grow to over 14 feet (4.5 m). It got its name because of the black inside of its mouth; the actual color of the skin is varied: dull yellowish-green to a gun-metal gray. It is one of the fastest snakes in the world, capable of moving at 10 to 12 mph (16 to 20 km/h). Killer Snake: The Black Mamba is a territorial snake and will normally retreat from danger. However, this snake will become very aggressive if it feels threatened, especially if the threat is standing between the snake and its lair. When in its aggressive mode, the mamba will rear its head as high as possible, even sometimes being able to look directly into the eyes of an averaged sized human depending on the snake's size. It will arch its back and advance rapidly while balanced on the rear third of its body, jaws open to reveal the inky black inside of its mouth while hissing very aggressively. Its bite delivers about 100 mg of venom; 10 to 15 mg is deadly to a human adult. When hunting small animals it delivers a single bite and backs off, waiting for the nerve toxin in its venom to paralyze the prey. If the prey is a bird, it will usually hang on to the bird waiting for the venom to take effect. If fighting off a threat, it will deliver multiple deadly strikes. Death is due to suffocation resulting from paralysis of the muscles used for breathing. Even though its venom is not the most toxic gram for gram, due to its aggressive nature and large quantity of venom delivered as well as its speed, it is widely regarded as the most dangerous snake in the world. Snake's Lair: Black Mambas spend their nights in holes in the ground - usually disused burrows - or hiding deep among fallen rocks or timber. These hiding places are also fled to by the snake if it becomes alarmed and it will attack any creature blocking the path to its hole. Cold Blooded: Like all reptiles, the Black Mamba is cold blooded, and relies on external heat to maintain its body temperature. Therefore, it frequently basks in the sun during the day, either on a low branch or a rock, but during the summer, the snake may be forced to take cover in its burrow if it becomes too hot. Eagle Eyes: Black Mambas travel quickly across rough ground or along low tree branches when hunting. They are able to hold their heads up to 1m above the ground when striking, and can hold them 50cm above the ground even when moving. They have very good eyesight and can strike their prey - rodents, bats, birds and lizards like lightning, leaving their powerful venom to finish off the kill. The venom is injected through two hollow fangs at the front of its mouth which lie flat until the snake bites something, at which point small, movable mouth bones erect them. The venom causes rapid paralysis. Enzymes in the snake's saliva start to digest the prey before it even reaches the stomach, and most prey is digested within a few hours. The Black Mamba is the second longest venomous snake in the world, and is also the fastest moving snake in the world; it can go up to twenty-three miles per hour. Snake Stories: Stories abound about Black Mambas chasing people for miles and visiting houses to kill every single person inside. All are exaggerations. Black Mambas are not as fierce as people describe them. They only use their speed as a defense mechanism to get away from any possible threat. In captivity Black Mambas are docile and appreciative animals that show a fantastic and active behavior when housed in a big enclosure the right way. Summer Romance: Breeding takes place in spring and early summer. Males may travel long distances looking for females. After mating, the snakes return to their own holes. Females lay between 10 and 25 eggs, usually in decaying vegetation. The decomposition of the vegetation gives off heat, which helps to warm the eggs and speed up hatching time. The shells of the eggs allow water and oxygen to reach the developing embryos. Mamba Babies: Black Mamba hatchlings are around 51cm long, and grayish-green in color. They are independent immediately and can catch prey the size of a small rat. Within a year, they reach 2m. Young mambas are eaten by mongooses, and even adult mambas are eaten by the secretary bird and larger species of eagle. The Black Mamba can grow to a maximum size of around 14 feet, but the average size is about 3. It has an average lifespan of up to twelve years in captivity. Foods in the diet of the Black Mamba include: Lizards, birds, rodents and other small mammals.

Black Mamba
Black Mamba








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™