Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Deep Krill
Behavior
A Light Delay
Math is a real brain bender
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Birds
Flightless Birds
Hawks
Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Atom Hauler
The science of disappearing
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Graphene's superstrength
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Farms sprout in cities
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Ancient Cave Behavior
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Bull Sharks
Angler Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Losing with Heads or Tails
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
A Fix for Injured Knees
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Shrimps
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Chihuahuas
Weasels and Kin
Cocker Spaniels
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Particle Zoo
IceCube Science
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Nature's Alphabet
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Asp
Komodo Dragons
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
A Light Delay
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Flying the Hyper Skies
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy

It's hard to imagine being so hungry that you'd eat another person. Yet, cannibalism occurs among animals and elsewhere in nature. Even galaxies do it. Now, scientists have captured one of the best images yet of a distant galaxy in the act of swallowing a smaller neighbor. The discovery supports the theory that galaxies grow by consuming each other. Astronomers have long suspected that it's a galaxy-eat-galaxy world out there. Many massive galaxies, including our own Milky Way, are surrounded by stellar debris that looks like undigested remnants of smaller star systems. The most direct evidence yet for that idea comes from an image taken in April 2002 by a new camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. Australian astronomer Michael Beasley noticed a faint galaxy in the background of the image. Nearby, two star plumes seemed to be coming out of some kind of small blob. Further analyses and computer simulations revealed that a big galaxy, about the size of the Milky Way, was sucking material, visible as plumes, from a smaller galaxy. The objects are about 2 billion light-years from Earth. Astronomers think that galaxy cannibalism is common. It's just hard to see. Luckily, our own galaxy doesn't seem to be at risk of getting slurped up. Sometimes, it's nice to be the biggest kid on the block—at least until we slam into Andromeda, the nearest, large spiral galaxy in our own neighborhood. Then, it'll be like two big, evenly matched kids battling it out on the schoolyard.—E. Sohn

Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy








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