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Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
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Amphibians
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Professor Ant
Cannibal Crickets
Armadillo
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Meet your mysterious relative
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Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
The metal detector in your mouth
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
The Book of Life
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Supersight for a Dino King
Dino Takeout for Mammals
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
A Global Warming Flap
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Sahara Cemetery
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Skates
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Symbols from the Stone Age
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Play for Science
Human Body
Spit Power
Remembering Facts and Feelings
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Jellyfish
Bees
Mammals
Weasels and Kin
Sperm Whale
Manxes
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
One ring around them all
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Springing forward
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Geckos
Cobras
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
A Light Delay
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Warmest Year on Record
Where rivers run uphill
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Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy

It's hard to imagine being so hungry that you'd eat another person. Yet, cannibalism occurs among animals and elsewhere in nature. Even galaxies do it. Now, scientists have captured one of the best images yet of a distant galaxy in the act of swallowing a smaller neighbor. The discovery supports the theory that galaxies grow by consuming each other. Astronomers have long suspected that it's a galaxy-eat-galaxy world out there. Many massive galaxies, including our own Milky Way, are surrounded by stellar debris that looks like undigested remnants of smaller star systems. The most direct evidence yet for that idea comes from an image taken in April 2002 by a new camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. Australian astronomer Michael Beasley noticed a faint galaxy in the background of the image. Nearby, two star plumes seemed to be coming out of some kind of small blob. Further analyses and computer simulations revealed that a big galaxy, about the size of the Milky Way, was sucking material, visible as plumes, from a smaller galaxy. The objects are about 2 billion light-years from Earth. Astronomers think that galaxy cannibalism is common. It's just hard to see. Luckily, our own galaxy doesn't seem to be at risk of getting slurped up. Sometimes, it's nice to be the biggest kid on the block—at least until we slam into Andromeda, the nearest, large spiral galaxy in our own neighborhood. Then, it'll be like two big, evenly matched kids battling it out on the schoolyard.—E. Sohn

Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy








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