Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Getting the dirt on carbon
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
From Chimps to People
Eyes on the Depths
Behavior
A Global Warming Flap
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Making light of sleep
Birds
Albatrosses
Blue Jays
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
The science of disappearing
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Unnatural Disasters
Deep History
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Blooming Jellies
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Words of the Distant Past
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Lampreys
Basking Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Chew for Health
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Math Naturals
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Gut Microbes and Weight
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Sea Urchin
Spiders
Mammals
Felines
Tigers
Bumblebee Bats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
One ring around them all
Project Music
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Nature's Alphabet
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Iguanas
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
The two faces of Mars
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Toy Challenge
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Charged cars that would charge
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Big Fish in Ancient Waters

Small things have been in the news a lot lately. First came word of a species of little people who lived in Indonesia tens of thousands of years ago (see http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20041103/Note2.asp ). Then, scientists announced the discovery of an unusually small type of dinosaur that used to live in Germany (see http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20041117/Note2.asp ). This week, it's news that certain space objects are smaller than astronomers used to think they were (see http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20041201/Note2.asp ). A new set of fossils suggests that a species of really big fish lived off the coast of South Carolina 26 million years ago. Now extinct, the giant fish, called Xiphiorhynchus rotundus, belonged to a group of water creatures called billfish. The group includes modern-day swordfish and marlin. If you could catch an adult X. rotundus today, it would break all world records for size. In modern times, the record holder among billfish is a black marlin that was caught in 1953 off the coast of Peru. It was 4.4 meters (14.4 feet) long and weighed 708 kilograms (1,560 pounds). X. rotundus was at least 5.1 meters (16.7 feet) long, says Harry Fierstine, a researcher from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. That's about the size of a big alligator! To come up with this estimate, the scientists compared the X. rotundus fossils with bones from a close European relative (also extinct). The new find included a few vertebrae (spine bones), which measured as much as 14.7 centimeters (5.8 inches) long and 10.9 centimeters (4.3 inches) across. The ancient fish could have had anywhere from 24 to 26 vertebrae along its spine, so full-grown adults might have been even bigger than an alligator. Either way, X. rotundus is the biggest billfish ever discovered. Imagine the size of the fishing rod you would need to catch one of those!E. Sohn

Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Big Fish in Ancient Waters








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™