Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Walktopus
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Body clocks
Mosquito duets
Birds
Albatrosses
A Meal Plan for Birds
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Screaming for Ice Cream
A Framework for Growing Bone
Pencil Thin
Computers
Play for Science
Programming with Alice
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Island of Hope
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Power of the Wind
Ready, unplug, drive
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Seahorses
Electric Catfish
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Making good, brown fat
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Snails
Worms
Dust Mites
Mammals
Miniature Schnauzers
Walrus
Scottish Folds
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Electric Backpack
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Fungus Hunt
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Cobras
Asp
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Burst Busters
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
A Light Delay
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Watering the Air
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™