Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Making the most of a meal
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Walks on the Wild Side
Dolphin Sponge Moms
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Behavior
The (kids') eyes have it
Copycat Monkeys
Monkeys in the Mirror
Birds
Lovebirds
Ospreys
Chicken
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
A Light Delay
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Computers
Middle school science adventures
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Dino Takeout for Mammals
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Bugs with Gas
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
Power of the Wind
The Wolf and the Cow
Ready, unplug, drive
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Dogfish
Hagfish
Electric Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Monkeys Count
Math of the World
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Moths
Dust Mites
Crustaceans
Mammals
Marmots
African Wildedbeest
Prairie Dogs
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Speedy stars
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Fast-flying fungal spores
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Iguanas
Komodo Dragons
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
A Family in Space
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on a Rocky Road
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Warmest Year on Record
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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