Seeds of the Future
Flush-Free Fertilizer
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
A Wild Ferret Rise
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Pondering the puzzling platypus
The Science Fair Circuit
Carnivorous Birds
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Undercover Detectives
Atomic Drive
Bandages that could bite back
A Classroom of the Mind
The science of disappearing
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
The man who rocked biology to its core
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
What is groundwater
Riding to Earth's Core
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
The Taming of the Cat
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
The Essence of Celery
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Detecting True Art
Human Body
A New Touch
Foul Play?
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Project Music
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Stalking Plants by Scent
Farms sprout in cities
Nature's Alphabet
Gila Monsters
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Weaving with Light
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes

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