Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Red Apes in Danger
Mouse Songs
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Meet your mysterious relative
Pain Expectations
Birds
Cassowaries
Roadrunners
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Atomic Drive
Computers
Lighting goes digital
A Classroom of the Mind
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Fossil Forests
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
Bald Eagles Forever
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Early Maya Writing
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Dogfish
Great White Shark
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Symbols from the Stone Age
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math Naturals
Human Body
A New Touch
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Bees
Shrimps
Crustaceans
Mammals
Polar Bear
Dachshunds
Cheetah
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Farms sprout in cities
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Pythons
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Ready, Set, Supernova
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Slip Sliming Away
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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