Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Red Apes in Danger
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Nice Chimps
Birds
Geese
Ospreys
Chicken
Chemistry and Materials
Getting the dirt on carbon
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Diamond Glow
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
New eyes to scan the skies
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Pollution Detective
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Piranha
Sturgeons
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
The Color of Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Electricity's Spark of Life
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Lice
Dust Mites
Beetles
Mammals
Vampire Bats
Pitbulls
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Black Hole Journey
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Stalking Plants by Scent
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Reptiles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Chaos Among the Planets
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Arctic Melt
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Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. And packages and letters will carry electronic tags that send messages about where they are. To make such a world possible, scientists are working on a technology called radiofrequency identification (RFID). An RFID tag is an electronic device that can be glued to cereal boxes, milk cartons, envelopes, and other objects. The tags store information and use radio signals to communicate with computers or sensors. RFID tags already exist in the form of "smart cards" that store dollar amounts for riders of some public transportation systems. RFID chips have also been implanted in animals to identify them and allow owners to find them if the animals get lost. In these cases, the tags are made of silicon, the material from which most computer chips are made. However, silicon electronic tags are too expensive to be used as widely as printed bar codes are. Now, scientists from two companies in Europe have independently taken steps toward speeding up the spread of RFID technology. They have created tags completely out of plastic materials with the right kinds of electronic properties to transmit radio signals efficiently. The methods for making plastic tags are much cheaper than those for making silicon tags. The tags produced by scientists from Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven in the Netherlands are made from a type of plastic called pentacene and transmit radio waves at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz. The tags produced by PolyIC in Erlangen, Germany, use a different type of plastic. Neither type of tag is perfect yet. The plastic tags are still expensive and tricky to manufacture, and their radio signals don't travel very far. It may be a few years yet before plastic RFIDs make their way into nearly all of our everyday objects. But when they do, there will be an amazing amount of information zooming invisibly around us.E. Sohn

Beyond Bar Codes
Beyond Bar Codes








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