Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Springing forward
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Thieves of a Feather
Deep Krill
Behavior
Fighting fat with fat
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
Hummingbirds
Doves
Swans
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Getting in Touch with Touch
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
South America's sticky tar pits
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Power of the Wind
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Words of the Distant Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Codfish
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Packing Fat
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Play for Science
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Taste Messenger
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Lice
Spiders
Mammals
Aardvarks
Gray Whale
Bandicoot
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Project Music
Invisibility Ring
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
A Giant Flower's New Family
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Lizards
Asp
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
Sounds of Titan
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Bees

Bees are flying insects, closely related to wasps and ants. There are approximately 20,000 species of bees, and they can be found on every continent except Antarctica. Bees are adapted for feeding on nectar and pollen, the former primarily as an energy source, and the latter primarily for protein and other nutrients. Most pollen is used for food for the brood. Bees have a long tube-like proboscis that enables them to obtain the nectar from flowers. Bees have antennae made up of thirteen segments in males and twelve in females. They have two pairs of wings, the back pair being the smaller of the two. Important pollinators : Bees may focus on gathering nectar or on gathering pollen, depending on their greater need at the time. Bees gathering nectar may accomplish pollination, but bees that are deliberately gathering pollen are more efficient pollinators. It is estimated that one third of the human food supply depends on insect pollination, most of this accomplished by bees. Basket legs: Bees are fuzzy and carry an electrostatic charge, thus aiding in the adherence of pollen. They periodically stop foraging and groom themselves to pack the pollen into specialized pollen baskets which are on the legs of honeybees and some other species, and on the ventral abdomen on other species. Mission - "Pollen": Visiting flowers is a dangerous occupation, with very high mortality rates. Many assassin bugs and crab spiders hide in flowers to capture unwary bees. Others are lost to birds in flight. Insecticides used on blooming plants can kill large numbers of bees, both by direct poisoning and by contaminating their food supply. A honeybee queen may lay 2000 eggs per day during spring buildup, but she also must lay 1000 to 1500 eggs per day during the foraging season, simply to replace daily casualties. Sting like a bee: In honeybees, the worker bees have a modified ovipositor called a stinger with which they can sting to defend the hive. Contrary to popular belief, the bee will not always die soon after stinging: this is a misconception based on the fact that a bee will always die shortly after stinging a mammal; however, the stinger evolved primarily for inter-bee combat. Members of the hive Worker bees are infertile females, however in some circumstances they may lay infertile eggs. Worker bees secrete the wax used to build the hive, clean and maintain the hive, raise the young, guard the hive and forage for nectar and pollen. Live to love: Drone bees are the male bees of the colony. Since they do not have ovipositors, they also do not have stingers. Drone honeybees do not forage for nectar or pollen. In some species, drones are suspected of playing a contributing role in the temperature regulation of the hive. The primary purpose of a drone bee is to fertilize a new queen. Drones mate with the queen in flight, then die immediately after mating. Long live the Queen!: Queens live for up to three years, while workers have an average life of only three months (during the foraging season, but longer in places with extended winters). Cool in the heat: When a hive detects smoke, many bees become remarkably non aggressive. It is speculated that this is a defense mechanism; wild colonies generally live in hollow trees, and when bees detect smoke it is presumed that they prepare to evacuate from a forest fire, carrying as much food reserve as they can. In this state, defense from predation is relatively unimportant; saving as much as possible is the most important activity. The larvae and pupae in a frame of honeycomb are referred to as frames of brood and are often sold (with adhering bees) by beekeepers to other beekeepers to start new beehives. Breakfast fit for a queen: Both workers and queens are fed royal jelly during the first three days of the larval stage, then workers are switched to a diet of pollen and nectar or diluted honey, while those intended for queens will continue to receive royal jelly. This causes the larva to develop to the pupa stage more quickly, while being also larger and fully developed sexually. The fall of the throne: Periodically, the colony determines that a new queen is needed. There are three general triggers: * The colony becomes space-constrained because the hive is filled with honey, leaving little room for new eggs. This will trigger a swarm where the old queen will take about half the worker bees to found a new colony, leaving the new queen with the other half of worker bees to continue the old colony. * The old queen begins to fail. This is thought to be recognized by a decrease in queen pheromones throughout the hive. This situation is called supersedure. At the end of the supersedure, the old queen is generally killed. * The old queen dies suddenly. This is an emergency supersedure. The worker bees will find several eggs or larvae in the right age-range and attempt to develop them into queens. Emergency supersedure can generally be recognized because the queen cell is built out from a regular cell of the comb rather than hanging from the bottom of a frame. Regardless of the trigger, the workers develop the larvae into queens by continuing to feed them royal jelly. This triggers an extended development as a pupa. Killer Queen: When the virgin queen emerges, she is commonly thought to seek out other queen cells and sting the infant queens within and that should two queens emerge simultaneously, they will fight to the death. Recent studies, however, have indicated that colonies may maintain two queens in as many as 10% of hives. The mechanism by which this occurs is not yet known. Regardless, the queen asserts her control over the worker bees through the release of a complex suite of pheromones called queen scent. Husbands in the air: After several days of orientation within and around the hive, the young queen flies to a drone congregation point - a site near a clearing and generally about 30 feet above the ground where the drones from different hives tend to congregate. Drones find the queen by sight and mate with her in midair. After mating, the drone dies. A queen will mate multiple times and may return several days in a row, weather permitting, until her spermathrecea is full. The queen lays all the eggs in a healthy colony. The number and pace of egg-laying is controlled by weather and availability of resources and by the characteristics of the specific race of honeybee. Honeybees queens generally begin to slow egg-laying in the early-fall and may even stop during the winter. Egg-laying will generally resume in late winter as soon as the days begin to get longer. Egg-laying generally peaks in the spring. At the height of the season, she may lay over 2500 eggs per day - more than her own body mass. The queen fertilizes each egg as it is being laid using stored sperm from the spermatheca. The queen will occasionally not fertilize an egg. These eggs, having only half as many genes as the queen or the workers, develop into drones.

Bees
Bees








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™