Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Monkeys Count
Bee Disease
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Behavior
Ear pain, weight gain
Video Game Violence
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Parakeets
Falcons
Crows
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
Atom Hauler
Makeup Science
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Unnatural Disasters
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Fungus Hunt
A Change in Time
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Perches
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Food for Life
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Monkeys Count
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
A Better Flu Shot
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Beetles
Lice
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
Pomeranians
Tigers
Pugs
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Stalking Plants by Scent
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Garter Snakes
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Bee Heat Cooks Invaders

Have you ever noticed how warm you get at concerts, street fairs, and other big-crowd events? Body heat from all those people really adds up. Body heat can be so powerful that some honeybees in Asia use it as a deadly weapon. A few dozen bees sometimes swarm around attacking wasps and heat them to death. The bees that collect into a ball to kill a wasp or some other invader seem to regulate how hot it gets to keep from cooking themselves, says an international team of scientists. The team studied this heat-balling behavior in two species of honeybees. One species is native to Asia. The other species, the European honeybee, was brought to Asia about 50 years ago. Heat balling is a defense mechanism used by honeybees against fierce wasps that break into beehives and nests in order to steal bee babies as food for the wasps' own young. The wasps are as big as 5 centimeters (2 inches) from wingtip to wingtip, and researchers have seen a single wasp win battles against as many as 6,000 bees, when those bees are of a type that doesn't make heat balls to defend themselves. To further study this defense behavior, the scientists tied down 12 wasps and moved one wasp close to each of six colonies of European bees and six colonies of Asian bees. All of the defender bees from each colony surrounded its wasp immediately. The researchers then used a special sensor to measure temperatures inside the bee clumps. Within 5 minutes, the temperature at the center of an average ball rose to around 45 degrees C (113 degrees F). That's high enough to kill a wasp. In separate tests, the researchers checked to see how close the bees came to cooking themselves. There's a margin of safety, they say. Asian honeybees die at 50.7 degrees C (123 degrees F) and European honeybees die at 51.8 degrees C (125 degrees F). Native Asian bees have better heat-balling tactics than the European imports do, the scientists found. The native bees gather one and a half times as many individuals in their swarms as the European bees do. It makes sense that the Asian bees are better at fighting wasps, the researchers say. They and the Asian baby-snatching wasps have been enemies for thousands of years, lots of time for the bees to perfect their heat-balling technique.E. Sohn

Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™