Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Newts
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Sleepless at Sea
New Mammals
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
How Much Babies Know
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Birds
Rheas
Quails
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Popping to Perfection
Computers
Lighting goes digital
Hubble trouble doubled
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
An Ancient Spider's Web
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Watering the Air
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Ready, unplug, drive
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Swordfish
Megamouth Sharks
Bass
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Germ Zapper
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Corals
Fleas
Mammals
Chipmunks
African Jackal
Kangaroos
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
One ring around them all
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Sweet, Sticky Science
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Lizards
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Cousin Earth
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Watering the Air
Arctic Melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Bee Disease

Honeybees are disappearing for unknown reasons around the United States (See "Where Have All the Bees Gone?"). The decline has been drastic: Last winter, bees disappeared from 23 percent of American beekeeping businesses. Causes of the phenomenon, however, have remained a mystery. Now, scientists from several universities and the United States Department of Agriculture say they have a possible explanation for the bee decline, also called colony-collapse disorder. One suspect is a little-known virus called Israeli acute-paralysis virus (IAPV). The virus kills bees. Researchers in Israel first described it in 2004. But until now, bee experts hadn't paid much attention to it. When trying to find out why the bees were disappearing, a research team at Columbia University in New York City studied bee colonies both with and without symptoms of the collapse disorder. In each colony, the scientists looked for evidence of microbes living only in the sick colonies. Their search turned up large numbers of two types of fungi once suspected of causing colony-collapse disorder. The data, however, showed that the fungi were almost as common in colonies without symptoms of the disorder as they were in symptomfree colonies. The researchers concluded that the two fungi probably weren't the cause of the disorder. Studies of the presence of IAPV, however, were more revealing. In those studies, done by a team at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, the virus showed up in 83 percent of samples from colonies with symptoms. Only 5 percent of samples from symptomless colonies had it, reports lead researcher Diana Cox-Foster. Scientists still don't know whether IAPV can single-handedly cause colony-collapse disorder. One reason is that even if the virus is making colonies sick, it could have a partner in crime. It's possible, for instance, that mites or chemicals in the environment weaken bees, making them more likely to catch IAPV. Either way, scientists are encouraged. They now know that the presence of IAPV is a strong sign that a colony has the disorder. And they know how to screen colonies for IAPV. Scientists are still trying to figure out how IAPV came to the United States. Cox-Foster and her colleagues have found IAPV in living bees from Australia and in bee food from China. "This is the first record of the virus in North America," Cox-Foster says. The United States currently allows bee products to be imported from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. If it turns out that this trade is spreading disease, the rules might eventually change.—Emily Sohn

Bee Disease
Bee Disease








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™