Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Seeds of the Future
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Awake at Night
Mouse Songs
Behavior
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Baby Number Whizzes
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Eagles
Condors
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Supergoo to the rescue
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
The Shape of the Internet
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
Surf Watch
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
Ready, unplug, drive
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Puffer Fish
Dogfish
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Giant Clam
Flatworms
Mammals
African Gorillas
Deers
Little Brown Bats
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Project Music
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Seeds of the Future
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Boa Constrictors
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
Cool as a Jupiter
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Crime Lab
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's temperate oceans. Sizes and Scales: Reported to reach a weight of six tonnes and maximum length of 15.2 metres (50 feet), but most often recorded at up to four tons and 9.8 metres (32 feet), Basking Sharks are one of the classic "sea monsters" of old. Not Just a Pretty Face: These sharks have been mistaken for Great White Sharks: the two species can be easily distinguished, however, by the Basking's cavernous maw (up to a metre in width, held wide open whilst feeding), longer and more obvious gill slits (which nearly circle the entire head and are accompanied by well-developed gill rakers), smaller eyes, and usually smaller girth. Telling Teeth: Also, Great Whites possess large, dagger-like teeth, whilst those of the Basking Shark are greatly reduced (5-6 mm) and hooked; only the first 3-4 rows of the upper jaw and 6-7 rows of the lower are functional. Basking in the Sun: Basking sharks are so named for their apparent basking behavior while feeding. They are most often seen while basking at the surface with their mouths open. Filter Feeders: The Basking shark is a filter feeder eating plankton from the water with its wide, gaping mouth. Unlike the Megamouth Shark and Whale Shark, Basking Sharks do not appear to actively seek their quarry, but do possess large olfactory bulbs that may point the sharks in the right direction. Birds and the Bees: Basking Sharks are ovoviviparous: the developing embryos first rely on a yolk sac, and as there is no placental connection, they later rely on unfertilized ova produced by the mother (a behaviour known as oophagy). Gestation is thought to span over a year (but perhaps much longer), with a small and unknown number of young born fully developed at 1.5-2 metres (5-6.5 feet) in length. Mating is thought to occur in early summer and birthing in late summer, following the female's movement into shallow coastal waters. The onset of maturity in Basking Sharks is not known with certainty but is thought to be between the 6-13th year of life and at a length of between 4.6-6 metres. Breeding frequency is also unknown, but is thought to be 2-4 years. Useless Teeth: The seemingly useless teeth of Basking Sharks may play a role in courtship behaviour, possibly as a means for the male to keep hold of the female during mating.

Basking Sharks
Basking Sharks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™