Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Silk’s superpowers
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
From Chimps to People
Missing Moose
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Behavior
Supersonic Splash
Taking a Spill for Science
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Ospreys
Peafowl
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Supersonic Splash
Getting in Touch with Touch
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Shrinking Glaciers
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
A Stormy History
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Chicken of the Sea
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Angler Fish
Piranha
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
The Color of Health
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Prime Time for Cicadas
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Nautiluses
Centipedes
Sea Anemones
Mammals
Dachshunds
Cats
Caribou
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Gaining a Swift Lift
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Nature's Alphabet
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Komodo Dragons
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Saturn's New Moons
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Satellite of Your Own
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Barracudas

Barracudas are ray-finned fishes noted for their large size (up to 1.8 m or 6 ft) and frightening appearance. The body is long, fairly compressed, and covered with small, smooth scales. They are found in tropical and subtropical oceans around the world. Their genus, Sphyraenus, is the only genus in the family Sphyraenidae. The larger species of barracuda grow to a length of 8 feet or more and have a weight of approximately 100 lb. Barracudas are elongated fishes with powerful jaws. The lower jaw of the mouth juts out beyond the upper jaw. Barracudas possess strong, fang-like teeth. Their heads are quite large and pointy. In general, the barracuda's coloration is dark green or grey above chalky-white below. Sometimes there is a row of darker cross-bars or black spots on each side. The fins may be yellowish or dusky. The Element of Surprise: Barracudas travel independently as well as in schools, and dwell near reefs or open seas. They are voracious predators and hunt using a classic example of lie-in-wait or ambush. They rely on surprise and short bursts of speed to overrun their prey. Big and Greedy: The larger barracuda are more or less solitary in their habits. Young and half-grown fish frequently congregate in shoals. Their food is composed almost totally of fishes of all kinds. Large barracudas, when full, exhibit the curious tendency to hoard a shoal of fishes in shallow water, guarding over them until they are ready for another meal. Gentle Giants: Like sharks, barracudas have long suffered from an unjust bad reputation inflicted on them by the media. In reality, unprovoked attacks on humans are extremely rare and millions of scuba divers, snorkelers and swimmers spend time with them in the water without any incidents. Barracudas sometimes do follow snorkelers and scuba divers across the reef, which can make one feel uncomfortable, but still they are completely harmless unless provoked. Handfeeding or trying to touch them is strongly discouraged. Spearfishing around barracudas can also be quite dangerous, as they are strongly attracted by the wounded fish. Nobody's Perfect: There have been isolated cases where barracudas did bite a human thinking that part of it was a fish, but these incidents are extremely rare and are generally caused by bad visibility. Barracudas will always stop after the first bite as humans are not their normal food source. Barracudas belong to the great order of Perch-like fishes, Percomorphi. Along with the smaller grey mullets and sand smelts or atherines, barracudas form the suborder known as mugiloids. Members of this group are distinguished from the Percoids by the backward position of the pelvic fins, which are located well behind the pectorals. Only some species of barracuda grow to a large size. The species which do are the European barracuda, barracouta or spet (S. sphyraena), found in the Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic; the great barracuda, picuda or becuna (S. picuda), ranging on the Atlantic coast of tropical America from Florida to Brazil and reaching the Bermudas; the California Barracuda (S. argentea), extending from Puget Sound southwards to Cape San Lucas; the Indian barracuda (S. jello) and the black-finned or Commerson's barracuda (S. commersoni), both from the seas of India and the Malay Peninsula and Archipelago.

Barracudas
Barracudas








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™