Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Who's Knocking?
Behavior
Night of the living ants
The chemistry of sleeplessness
The Disappearing Newspaper
Birds
Penguins
Parrots
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Boosting Fuel Cells
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Programming with Alice
Play for Science
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Island of Hope
Life trapped under a glacier
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Little Bits of Trouble
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Salt and Early Civilization
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Seahorses
Electric Eel
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Chocolate Rules
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Flies
Lice
Leeches
Mammals
Whales
Pomeranians
Weasels and Kin
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Invisibility Ring
Road Bumps
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Fungus Hunt
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Geckos
Black Mamba
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Crime Lab
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Bandicoot

A bandicoot is any of about 20 species of small to medium-sized, terrestrial marsupial omnivores in the order Peramelemorphia. The word bandicoot is an anglicised form of the Telugu word pandhi-kokku, (loosely, pig-dog) which originally referred to the unrelated Indian Bandicoot Rat. The other two species of peramelemorphs are the bilbies. Who, What, Where, When: Bilbies are marsupial omnivores; they are members of the Peramelemorphia biological order and the largest of the bandicoots. Before European colonization of Australia there were two species. One became extinct in the 1950s, the other survives but remains endangered. Just the Facts: Bilbies have the characteristic long bandicoot muzzle and very long ears. As compared with other bandicoots, they have a longer tail, bigger ears, and softer, silky fur. "Sorry, I don't drink..." They are nocturnal omnivores that do not need to drink water, as they get all the moisture they need from their food, which includes insects and their larvae, seeds, spiders, bulbs, fruit, fungi and very small animals. Most food is found by digging or scratching in the soil, and using their very long tongues. Master Architects: They are excellent burrowers and build extensive tunnel systems with their strong forelimbs and well-developed claws. A bilby typically makes a number of burrows within its home range, up to about a dozen, and moves between them, using them for shelter both from predators and the heat of the day. Unusual Marsupial: The embryos of bandicoots, unlike other marsupials, form a placenta-like organ that connects it to the uterine wall. The function of this organ is probably to transfer nutrients from the mother; however the structure is small compared to those of the placentalia. Classification Confusion: Classification within the Peramelemorphia used to be simple: there were thought to be two families in the order — the short-legged and mostly herbivorous bandicoots, and the longer-legged, more nearly carnivorous bilbies. In recent years, however, it has become clear that the situation is more complex. First, the bandicoots of the New Guinean and far-northern Australian rainforests were deemed distinct from all other bandicoots, and these were grouped together in the separate family Peroryctidae. More recently, the bandicoot families were reunited in Peramelidae, with the New Guinean species split into four genera in two subfamilies, Peroryctinae and Echymiperinae, while the "true bandicoots" occupy the subfamily Peramelinae. The only exception is the extinct Pig-footed Bandicoot, which has been given its own family, Chaeropodidae.

Bandicoot
Bandicoot








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™