Agriculture
Watering the Air
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Polar Bears in Trouble
Behavior
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
From dipping to fishing
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Birds
Dodos
Flamingos
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Flytrap Machine
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
Galaxies on the go
A Classroom of the Mind
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
An Ancient Spider's Web
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Deep History
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Alien Invasions
Ready, unplug, drive
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Tilapia
Seahorses
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
The Color of Health
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Mastering The GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Deep-space dancers
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Wasps
Roundworms
Tarantula
Mammals
African Wildedbeest
Bobcats
Skunks
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Black Hole Journey
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Getting the dirt on carbon
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Anacondas
Geckos
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Burst Busters
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Toy Challenge
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Catching Some Rays
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Baby Talk

Kids are far better than adults at learning how to speak multiple languages. Research now shows that very young infants might have some of the best language skills of all.A new study suggests that babies between 4 and 6 months old can tell the difference between two languages just by looking at the speaker's face. They don't need to hear a word. Sometime between 6 and 8 months of age, babies raised in homes where just one language is spoken lose this ability. Babies from bilingual homes, on the other hand, keep the face-reading ability until they're at least 8 months old. Researchers in Canada, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, studied 36 infants from English-speaking families. Twelve of the babies were 4 months old, 12 were 6 months old, and the rest were 8 months old. Each baby sat on his or her mother's lap and watched video clips of a woman talking. The woman was fluent in both English and French. In some clips, she read from a storybook in English. In other clips, she read in French. In all of the videos, there was no sound. After watching clip after clip of the woman reading in just one language, the babies eventually started to look away, apparently because they were bored. The researchers then showed the babies a new silent clip of the woman reading a story in the other language. At that point, the 4- and 6-month olds started looking at the screen again. The 8-month olds, by contrast, paid no attention. The second study involved a different set of 36 infants of the same ages. These babies were from English-speaking homes. They watched silent clips of the woman reading one set of sentences in either English or French until they grew bored. Then, they saw clips showing the woman read different sentences, but in the same language that she had already been speaking. None of the babies showed a renewed interest. A third trial included 24 infants of the same ages whose families spoke both English and French at home. In the first set of clips, the woman spoke in one language, and in the second set she used the other language. All babies in this study looked longer at clips after the woman switched languages. That suggests that, in bilingual families, a baby's ability to distinguish between languages persists at least until eight months of age. Together, these results suggest that "visual information about speech may play a more critical role [in language learning] than previously anticipated," says lead researcher and psychologist Whitney M. Weikum. It's not yet clear, she adds, which part of the speaker's face babies are looking at for clues. Next, scientists want to see whether babies can match faces with the voices of foreign-language speakers. If babies can do this, the scientists would then like to know if this ability also declines toward the end of the first year of life.—Emily Sohn

Baby Talk
Baby Talk








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™