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Earth from the inside out
Small but WISE
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
What is groundwater
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Ready, unplug, drive
Plant Gas
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Watching deep-space fireworks
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Mako Sharks
Great White Shark
Carp
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Symbols from the Stone Age
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Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
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Mastering The GSAT Exam
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GSAT Exam Preparation
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Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Spit Power
Running with Sneaker Science
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Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
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Wolves
Manxes
Ponies
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Black Hole Journey
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Nature's Alphabet
Fast-flying fungal spores
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Gila Monsters
Turtles
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Catching a Comet's Tail
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Science loses out when ice caps melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Baby Star

In Hollywood, a hit movie can make an actor a big star overnight. In outer space, star birth takes a bit longer. Astronomers have now observed what they suggest is a baby star in the process of being born. If they're right, it'll be the earliest twinkles ever picked up from a newborn star. Through a telescope in outer space, the object looks like a faintly glowing body. Astronomers from the University of Texas in Austin spotted it with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which orbits Earth. The object lies 6,000 light-years from Earth in a thick cloud of gas and dust called L1014. In the past, L1014 has appeared totally dark. When the Spitzer team recently pointed the telescope at the cloud's center, though, they were surprised to see a spot of infrared light that looked like "a big, red, bloodshot eye." Infrared light isn't visible to the human eye, but all objects absorb and give off this form of radiation. At such an early stage in its life, the object has a tiny mass. Compared to our sun, it weighs in at less than one-thousandth the sun's mass. No one is sure what will happen next. One possibility is that the glimmering body will gather together enough gas and dust to become a true star. It's also possible that the object will run out of steam and instead turn into a faint, cold object known as a brown dwarf. In the star nursery, only time will tell.E. Sohn

Baby Star
Baby Star








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