Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Got Milk? How?
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Mouse Songs
Cannibal Crickets
Behavior
Night of the living ants
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Meet your mysterious relative
Birds
Kingfishers
Carnivorous Birds
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
Supergoo to the rescue
A Framework for Growing Bone
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
It's a Small E-mail World After All
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Bugs with Gas
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Trout
Electric Catfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Yummy bugs
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math of the World
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
A New Touch
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Spiders
Tapeworms
Giant Squid
Mammals
Mule
Killer Whales
Quolls
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Electric Backpack
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Nature's Alphabet
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Turtles
Anacondas
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Algae Motors
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Watering the Air
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Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lots of people just like me, but I also have friends who can stay up all night and still seem chipper the next day. How well do you fare after a slumber-less sleepover? Scientists have been studying sleep for decades, but they still know very little about the genes involved. Genes are stretches of DNA found within every cell. They direct all sorts of processes in the body. Sleep researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decided to focus on certain fruit flies (called Drosophila melanogaster) because their genes are easy to study and similar to ours. Fruit flies also sleep a lot, typically 9 to 15 hours a day. A sleeping fly looks like it's just sitting still. You can't hear the snores. The researchers collected more than 9,000 groups of fruit flies. Each group had a different set of genes. The scientists then observed several flies of each type to see how many hours a day the insects slept and how they behaved after being kept awake for 24 hours. One group of flies proved to be the most interesting. Named minisleep flies, they slept only 4 to 5 hours a day. Even after 24 hours without sleep, they did just as well on reaction tests as rested flies did. Normal sleep-deprived flies were much slower to react. After a series of tests, the scientists discovered one mutation in a single gene in the minisleep flies. As a result, these flies have nerves that appear to get excited easily. It's possible that people who don't need much sleep have a similar mutation. In every other way, minisleep flies seemed normal—except one. Most fruit flies live for about 3 or 4 months. The minisleepers lived about 2 weeks less. So, even if you feel fine on little sleep, the researchers say, skimping on sleep might affect your health in other ways. Knowing that, I'm going to make sure to sleep in tomorrow. If nothing else, I'll be a lot more pleasant to be around.—E. Sohn

Awake at Night
Awake at Night








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