Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Insect Stowaways
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
Nice Chimps
The Electric Brain
Birds
Flightless Birds
Hawks
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Graphene's superstrength
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
South America's sticky tar pits
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Bull Sharks
Saltwater Fish
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
A Taste for Cheese
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Oysters
Dragonflies
Mammals
Guinea Pigs
Dingoes
Koalas
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Fungus Hunt
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Turtles
Snapping Turtles
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
A Change in Climate
Arctic Melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lots of people just like me, but I also have friends who can stay up all night and still seem chipper the next day. How well do you fare after a slumber-less sleepover? Scientists have been studying sleep for decades, but they still know very little about the genes involved. Genes are stretches of DNA found within every cell. They direct all sorts of processes in the body. Sleep researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decided to focus on certain fruit flies (called Drosophila melanogaster) because their genes are easy to study and similar to ours. Fruit flies also sleep a lot, typically 9 to 15 hours a day. A sleeping fly looks like it's just sitting still. You can't hear the snores. The researchers collected more than 9,000 groups of fruit flies. Each group had a different set of genes. The scientists then observed several flies of each type to see how many hours a day the insects slept and how they behaved after being kept awake for 24 hours. One group of flies proved to be the most interesting. Named minisleep flies, they slept only 4 to 5 hours a day. Even after 24 hours without sleep, they did just as well on reaction tests as rested flies did. Normal sleep-deprived flies were much slower to react. After a series of tests, the scientists discovered one mutation in a single gene in the minisleep flies. As a result, these flies have nerves that appear to get excited easily. It's possible that people who don't need much sleep have a similar mutation. In every other way, minisleep flies seemed normal—except one. Most fruit flies live for about 3 or 4 months. The minisleepers lived about 2 weeks less. So, even if you feel fine on little sleep, the researchers say, skimping on sleep might affect your health in other ways. Knowing that, I'm going to make sure to sleep in tomorrow. If nothing else, I'll be a lot more pleasant to be around.—E. Sohn

Awake at Night
Awake at Night








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