Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Seeds of the Future
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
The History of Meow
Behavior
Body clocks
Pipefish power from mom
Dino-bite!
Birds
Roadrunners
Finches
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
The newest superheavy in town
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Games with a Purpose
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
The Rise of Yellowstone
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Acid Snails
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Writing on eggshells
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Pygmy Sharks
Angler Fish
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
A Taste for Cheese
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
What the appendix is good for
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Nautiluses
Millipedes
Worms
Mammals
Basset Hounds
Killer Whales
Woolly Mammoths
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Project Music
IceCube Science
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Supersuits for Superheroes
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Warmest Year on Record
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Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lots of people just like me, but I also have friends who can stay up all night and still seem chipper the next day. How well do you fare after a slumber-less sleepover? Scientists have been studying sleep for decades, but they still know very little about the genes involved. Genes are stretches of DNA found within every cell. They direct all sorts of processes in the body. Sleep researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decided to focus on certain fruit flies (called Drosophila melanogaster) because their genes are easy to study and similar to ours. Fruit flies also sleep a lot, typically 9 to 15 hours a day. A sleeping fly looks like it's just sitting still. You can't hear the snores. The researchers collected more than 9,000 groups of fruit flies. Each group had a different set of genes. The scientists then observed several flies of each type to see how many hours a day the insects slept and how they behaved after being kept awake for 24 hours. One group of flies proved to be the most interesting. Named minisleep flies, they slept only 4 to 5 hours a day. Even after 24 hours without sleep, they did just as well on reaction tests as rested flies did. Normal sleep-deprived flies were much slower to react. After a series of tests, the scientists discovered one mutation in a single gene in the minisleep flies. As a result, these flies have nerves that appear to get excited easily. It's possible that people who don't need much sleep have a similar mutation. In every other way, minisleep flies seemed normal—except one. Most fruit flies live for about 3 or 4 months. The minisleepers lived about 2 weeks less. So, even if you feel fine on little sleep, the researchers say, skimping on sleep might affect your health in other ways. Knowing that, I'm going to make sure to sleep in tomorrow. If nothing else, I'll be a lot more pleasant to be around.—E. Sohn

Awake at Night
Awake at Night








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