Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
G-Tunes with a Message
Big Squid
Missing Moose
Behavior
Fear Matters
Lightening Your Mood
Between a rock and a wet place
Birds
Pigeons
Cardinals
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Watching out for vultures
Popping to Perfection
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Earth from the inside out
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
What is groundwater
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Bald Eagles Forever
An Ocean View's Downside
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Salt and Early Civilization
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Skates and Rays
Hagfish
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Recipe for Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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GSAT Exam Preparation
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GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math of the World
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
A Long Trek to Asia
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Ticks
Bees
Mammals
Wolves
Narwhals
Foxes
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
One ring around them all
Gaining a Swift Lift
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Springing forward
Underwater Jungles
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Geckos
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Smart Windows
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lots of people just like me, but I also have friends who can stay up all night and still seem chipper the next day. How well do you fare after a slumber-less sleepover? Scientists have been studying sleep for decades, but they still know very little about the genes involved. Genes are stretches of DNA found within every cell. They direct all sorts of processes in the body. Sleep researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decided to focus on certain fruit flies (called Drosophila melanogaster) because their genes are easy to study and similar to ours. Fruit flies also sleep a lot, typically 9 to 15 hours a day. A sleeping fly looks like it's just sitting still. You can't hear the snores. The researchers collected more than 9,000 groups of fruit flies. Each group had a different set of genes. The scientists then observed several flies of each type to see how many hours a day the insects slept and how they behaved after being kept awake for 24 hours. One group of flies proved to be the most interesting. Named minisleep flies, they slept only 4 to 5 hours a day. Even after 24 hours without sleep, they did just as well on reaction tests as rested flies did. Normal sleep-deprived flies were much slower to react. After a series of tests, the scientists discovered one mutation in a single gene in the minisleep flies. As a result, these flies have nerves that appear to get excited easily. It's possible that people who don't need much sleep have a similar mutation. In every other way, minisleep flies seemed normal—except one. Most fruit flies live for about 3 or 4 months. The minisleepers lived about 2 weeks less. So, even if you feel fine on little sleep, the researchers say, skimping on sleep might affect your health in other ways. Knowing that, I'm going to make sure to sleep in tomorrow. If nothing else, I'll be a lot more pleasant to be around.—E. Sohn

Awake at Night
Awake at Night








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