Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Got Milk? How?
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Insects Take a Breather
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Fear Matters
Talking with Hands
Birds
Finches
Carnivorous Birds
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Small but WISE
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Middle school science adventures
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Pollution Detective
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Chicken of the Sea
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Great White Shark
Mahi-Mahi
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Healing Honey
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Electricity's Spark of Life
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Sea Anemones
Caterpillars
Mammals
Tigers
Bandicoot
Aquatic Animals
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
IceCube Science
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Fastest Plant on Earth
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Cobras
Pythons
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Atom Hauler

Atoms are everywhere, but you'd never know it. Even though these tiny building blocks of matter make up everything—from chairs to air—they're far too tiny to see with your own eyes. When scientists want to study atoms one at a time, however, they can use special, highly sensitive microscopes to see them. Using these tools, called scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs), researchers can also move individual atoms around. Now, researchers in France and Germany have taken the technology one step further. They have found a way to gather up and move around atoms in bunches. Their work may help them eventually make and operate tiny, nanoscale machines.The key part of a scanning tunneling microscope is an extremely sharp needle that rides over the surface being examined. This sharp tip can even nudge a single atom from one place to another. But maneuvering more than one atom at a time is a difficult juggling act. To make the task easier, the researchers created a new, six-legged molecule. They called it hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HBP). The molecule is shaped like a hexagon (having six sides) and contains rings of carbon atoms. Six tripodlike feet support the structure. Like a minuscule vacuum cleaner, it can easily slide over a copper surface, sucking up loose copper atoms. Experiments performed at very low temperatures and in practically airless conditions showed that an STM tip can move an HB-HBP molecule that holds as many as five copper atoms that the molecule has picked up. Scientists can then use the STM tip to lift the carrier molecule, leaving the clump of atoms behind. The development is a major step toward making molecule-sized machines, scientists say. Someday, tiny sweepers might gather atoms together to form wires. Or they might pile atoms into regularly spaced mounds that, together, affect light or magnetic fields in useful ways.—E. Sohn

Atom Hauler
Atom Hauler








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