Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Crocodile Hearts
Elephant Mimics
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Making Sense of Scents
Birds
Birds We Eat
A Meal Plan for Birds
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Undercover Detectives
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Batteries built by Viruses
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Flower family knows its roots
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Power of the Wind
Flu river
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Writing on eggshells
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Sturgeons
Whale Sharks
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
A Taste for Cheese
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Bees
Sea Urchin
Shrimps
Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Boxers
African Gorillas
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Speedy stars
Road Bumps
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Making the most of a meal
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Pythons
Lizards
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
A Great Ball of Fire
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Crime Lab
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Change in Climate
Arctic Melt
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Atom Hauler

Atoms are everywhere, but you'd never know it. Even though these tiny building blocks of matter make up everything—from chairs to air—they're far too tiny to see with your own eyes. When scientists want to study atoms one at a time, however, they can use special, highly sensitive microscopes to see them. Using these tools, called scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs), researchers can also move individual atoms around. Now, researchers in France and Germany have taken the technology one step further. They have found a way to gather up and move around atoms in bunches. Their work may help them eventually make and operate tiny, nanoscale machines.The key part of a scanning tunneling microscope is an extremely sharp needle that rides over the surface being examined. This sharp tip can even nudge a single atom from one place to another. But maneuvering more than one atom at a time is a difficult juggling act. To make the task easier, the researchers created a new, six-legged molecule. They called it hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HBP). The molecule is shaped like a hexagon (having six sides) and contains rings of carbon atoms. Six tripodlike feet support the structure. Like a minuscule vacuum cleaner, it can easily slide over a copper surface, sucking up loose copper atoms. Experiments performed at very low temperatures and in practically airless conditions showed that an STM tip can move an HB-HBP molecule that holds as many as five copper atoms that the molecule has picked up. Scientists can then use the STM tip to lift the carrier molecule, leaving the clump of atoms behind. The development is a major step toward making molecule-sized machines, scientists say. Someday, tiny sweepers might gather atoms together to form wires. Or they might pile atoms into regularly spaced mounds that, together, affect light or magnetic fields in useful ways.—E. Sohn

Atom Hauler
Atom Hauler








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