Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Walks on the Wild Side
Copybees
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Pain Expectations
The Disappearing Newspaper
Birds
Waterfowl
Doves
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Music of the Future
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
A Light Delay
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Bugs with Gas
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
The Birds are Falling
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
The Taming of the Cat
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Tilapia
Tiger Sharks
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Hey batter, wake up!
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Lice
Centipedes
Mammals
Siamese Cats
Dolphins
Whales
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fast-flying fungal spores
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Turtles
Caimans
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Icy Red Planet
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Beyond Bar Codes
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Watering the Air
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
A Change in Climate
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Atom Hauler

Atoms are everywhere, but you'd never know it. Even though these tiny building blocks of matter make up everything—from chairs to air—they're far too tiny to see with your own eyes. When scientists want to study atoms one at a time, however, they can use special, highly sensitive microscopes to see them. Using these tools, called scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs), researchers can also move individual atoms around. Now, researchers in France and Germany have taken the technology one step further. They have found a way to gather up and move around atoms in bunches. Their work may help them eventually make and operate tiny, nanoscale machines.The key part of a scanning tunneling microscope is an extremely sharp needle that rides over the surface being examined. This sharp tip can even nudge a single atom from one place to another. But maneuvering more than one atom at a time is a difficult juggling act. To make the task easier, the researchers created a new, six-legged molecule. They called it hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HBP). The molecule is shaped like a hexagon (having six sides) and contains rings of carbon atoms. Six tripodlike feet support the structure. Like a minuscule vacuum cleaner, it can easily slide over a copper surface, sucking up loose copper atoms. Experiments performed at very low temperatures and in practically airless conditions showed that an STM tip can move an HB-HBP molecule that holds as many as five copper atoms that the molecule has picked up. Scientists can then use the STM tip to lift the carrier molecule, leaving the clump of atoms behind. The development is a major step toward making molecule-sized machines, scientists say. Someday, tiny sweepers might gather atoms together to form wires. Or they might pile atoms into regularly spaced mounds that, together, affect light or magnetic fields in useful ways.—E. Sohn

Atom Hauler
Atom Hauler








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