Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Making the most of a meal
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Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
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Missing Moose
The History of Meow
Moss Echoes of Hunting
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Fish needs see-through head
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
A Global Warming Flap
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Cardinals
Birds We Eat
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
The Buzz about Caffeine
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
The science of disappearing
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Fossil Forests
Dino-bite!
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Shrinking Glaciers
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Earth from the inside out
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Ready, unplug, drive
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Sturgeons
Skates and Rays
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Making good, brown fat
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exam Preparation
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Hermit Crabs
Nautiluses
Mammals
Hoofed Mammals
Poodles
Ponies
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Speedy stars
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Snakes
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Searching for Alien Life
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Catching Some Rays
Warmest Year on Record
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Asteroid Lost and Found

Everybody loses things: Socks in the laundry. Sunglasses. Phone numbers written on little scraps of paper. You may have even lost your homework once or twice. But can you imagine losing an entire asteroid? That's exactly what happened to Hermes, an asteroid that vanished into the darkness after it was last spotted in 1937. Since then, astronomers have been scouring the skies for the runaway object. At long last, Hermes has shown up again. Early in the morning on Oct. 15, Brian Skiff of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., spotted a near-Earth asteroid and suspected it might be Hermes. Based on the asteroid's path, two scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., then used a computer program to trace the asteroid's journey over the past 66 years. They discovered that it has circled the sun 31 times without being seen. It has come as close as 640,000 kilometers to Earth, just 1.6 times the distance separating Earth and the moon. The scientists then looked ahead, calculating the asteroid's future path. Luckily, there's no chance that Hermes will crash into Earth within the next 100 years. New observations also show that Hermes is actually made up of two chunks that orbit each other. Each piece is about 300 to 450 meters across. Finding Hermes should help astronomers better understand how asteroids break apart and how each piece affects the movements of the other. Now, has anyone seen my mittens?E. Sohn

Asteroid Lost and Found
Asteroid Lost and Found








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