Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Newts
Animals
Gliders in the Family
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Bringing fish back up to size
Slumber by the numbers
Birds
Emus
Swifts
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Sticky Silky Feet
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Small but WISE
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Meet your mysterious relative
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Riding to Earth's Core
Springing forward
Environment
Flu river
Food Web Woes
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Angler Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Yummy bugs
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exam Preparation
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math of the World
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
Dreaming makes perfect
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Flatworms
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Bloodhounds
Scottish Folds
Porcupines
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
Project Music
Einstein's Skateboard
Road Bumps
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Iguanas
Pythons
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Planning for Mars
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Reach for the Sky
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Arctic Melt

Earth's North and South Poles are famous for being cold and icy. Last year, however, the amount of ice in the Arctic Ocean fell to a record low. Normally, ice builds in Arctic waters around the North Pole each winter and shrinks during the summer. But for many years, the amount of ice left by the end of summer has been declining. Since 1979, each decade has seen an 11.4 percent drop in end-of-summer ice cover. Between 1981 and 2000, ice in the Arctic lost 22 percent of its thickness—becoming 1.13 meters (3.7 feet) thinner. Last summer, Arctic sea ice reached its skimpiest levels yet. By the end of summer 2007, the ice had shrunk to cover just 4.2 million square kilometers (1.6 million square miles). That's 38 percent less area than the average cover at that time of year. And it's a whopping 23 percent below the previous record low, which was set just 2 years ago. This continuing trend has scientists concerned. There may be several reasons for the ice melt, says Jinlun Zhang, an oceanographer at the University of Washington in Seattle. Unusually strong winds blew through the Arctic last summer. The winds pushed much of the ice out of the central Arctic, leaving a large area of thin ice and open water. Scientists also suspect (but haven't yet documented) that fewer clouds cover the Arctic now than in the past. Clearer skies allow more sunlight to reach the ocean. The extra heat warms both the water and the atmosphere. Water in the area is definitely getting warmer. In parts of the Arctic Ocean last year, surface temperatures were 3.5° Celsius warmer than average and 1.5°C warmer than the previous record high. With both air and water getting warmer, the ice is melting from both above and below. In some parts of the Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska and western Canada, ice that measured 3.3 m (11 feet) thick at the beginning of the summer measured just 50 centimeters (20 inches) by season's end. The new measurements suggest that melting is far more severe than scientists have seen by just looking at ice cover from above, says Donald K. Perovich, a geophysicist at the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory in Hanover, N.H. "There's a lot less ice there than we think," he says. "And the farther we go down this path, the harder it is to get back." As more ice melts each summer, it takes longer for seawater to freeze each winter. Some scientists fear that the Arctic is stuck in a warming trend from which it may never recover.—Emily Sohn

Arctic Melt
Arctic Melt








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™