Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Who's Knocking?
Cool Penguins
Clone Wars
Behavior
Brain cells take a break
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Finches
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Cold, colder and coldest ice
A Light Delay
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Lighting goes digital
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
An Ancient Spider's Web
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Petrified Lightning
Environment
The Oily Gulf
The Birds are Falling
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Settling the Americas
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Whale Sharks
Dogfish
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
The Color of Health
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Electricity's Spark of Life
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Beetles
Lobsters
Mosquitos
Mammals
Mule
Horses
Rats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Underwater Jungles
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Tortoises
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Mercury's magnetic twisters
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Aquatic Animals

A marine mammal is a mammal that is primarily ocean-dwelling or depends on the ocean for its food. Mammals originally evolved on land, but later marine mammals evolved to live back in the ocean. There are five groups of marine mammals: 1. Order Sirenia: the manatee, dugong, and sea cow 2. Order Carnivora, family Ursidae: the polar bear 3. Order Carnivora, infrafamily Pinnipedia: the seal, sea lion, and walrus 4. Order Carnivora, family Mustelidae: the Sea Otter and Marine Otter 5. Order Cetacea: the whale, dolphin, and porpoise Since different groups of marine mammals originate from different ancestors, this is a case of convergent evolution. Since mammals originally evolved on land, their spines are optimized for running, allowing for up-and-down but only little sideways motion. Therefore, marine mammals typically swim by moving their spine up and down. By contrast, fish normally swim by moving their spine sideways. For this reason, fish mostly have vertical caudal (tail) fins, while marine mammals have horizontal caudal fins. Some of the primary differences between marine mammals and other marine life are: Marine mammals breathe air, while most other marine animals extract oxygen from water. Marine mammals have hair. Cetaceans have little or no hair, usually a very few bristles retained around the head or mouth. All members of the Carnivora have a coat of fur or hair, but it is far thicker and more important for thermoregulation in Sea Otters and Polar Bears than in seals or sea lions. Thick layers of fur contribute to drag while swimming, and slow down a swimming mammal, giving it a disadvantage in speed. Marine mammals have thick layers of blubber used to insulate their bodies and prevent heat loss. Sea Otters and Polar Bears are exceptions, relying more on fur and behavior to stave off hypothermia. Marine mammals give live birth. Most marine mammals only give birth to one calf or pup at a time, and are never able to birth twins or larger litters. Marine mammals feed off milk as young. Maternal care is extremely important to the survival of offspring that need to develop a thick insulating layer of blubber. The milk from the mammary glands of marine mammals often exceeds 40-50% fat content to support the development of blubber in the young. Marine mammals maintain a high internal body temperature. Unlike most other marine life, marine mammals carefully maintain a core temperature much higher than their environment. Blubber, thick coats of fur, blubbles of air between skin and water, countercurrent exchange, and behaviors such as hauling out, are all adaptations that aid marine mammals in retention of body heat. The polar bear spends a large proportion of its time in a marine environment, albeit a frozen one. When it does swim in the open sea it is extremely proficient and has been shown to cover 74 km in a day. For these reasons, some scientists regard it as a marine mammal.

Aquatic Animals
Aquatic Animals








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™