Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Seeds of the Future
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Big Squid
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Contemplating thought
Puberty gone wild
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Waterfowl
Penguins
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Picture the Smell
The science of disappearing
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Batteries built by Viruses
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Life trapped under a glacier
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Alien Invasions
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Sahara Cemetery
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Manta Rays
Megamouth Sharks
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Recipe for Health
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Monkeys Count
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Insects
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Labradors
Yaks
Wolves
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
A Change in Leaf Color
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Pythons
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Riding Sunlight
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Ancient Cave Behavior

People have been acting like people—in other words, they've been making tools, creating rituals, and sharing food—for a long time. That's the conclusion of a recent study from South Africa's southern coast. There, in a cave perched above the sea, researchers from Arizona State University in Tempe have found evidence that humans were behaving in surprisingly complex ways as early as 164,000 years ago. Our species, Homo sapiens, emerged an estimated 200,000 years ago. The cave held three important clues about the behavior of these Stone Age people. First, the researchers found the remains of a variety of shellfish, including mussels, giant periwinkles, and limpets. The cave dwellers probably collected these creatures from rocky shores and tide pools and brought them to the cave to eat. The researchers propose that the early Africans moved to the South African coast between 195,000 and 130,000 years ago. Around that time, the climate inland turned relatively cold and dry. As a result, there were fewer plants and animals to eat away from the coast. When these ancient people moved to the coast, they probably experienced a major cultural shift, the researchers suspect. That's because observations of modern hunter-gatherer societies suggest that men are more likely to hunt for big animals when people live inland. On the coast, women play a more important role in providing food by gathering plants and shellfish. As for the second clue, the researchers unearthed 57 pieces of reddish pigment. The researchers think that the cave dwellers used the pigment for coloring their bodies or for other rituals. Symbolic behavior is a distinctly human trait. Finally, the search turned up more than 1,800 stone tools, including well-crafted blades. These double-edged blades came in a variety of sizes. The smallest were just less than a half-inch wide. Ancient people may have attached these blades to the end of a stick to make spears or other tools. Until now, the earliest evidence of similar blades dates back just 70,000 years. The new discoveries support the theory that modern human behavior developed gradually, starting about 285,000 years ago, say some experts. An alternative theory proposes that people developed modern behavior much more recently—perhaps around 45,000 years ago. It's also possible that complex behavior developed at different rates in different places.—Emily Sohn

Ancient Cave Behavior
Ancient Cave Behavior








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™