Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Springing forward
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Clone Wars
New Mammals
Behavior
Lightening Your Mood
Talking with Hands
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Birds
Eagles
Penguins
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Bandages that could bite back
Cold, colder and coldest ice
These gems make their own way
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Programming with Alice
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet the new dinos
Dinosaur Dig
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Island of Hope
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Stone Age Sole Survivors
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Angler Fish
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Building a Food Pyramid
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Mussels
Sea Urchin
Lobsters
Mammals
Walrus
Black Bear
Pitbulls
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Road Bumps
Speedy stars
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Springing forward
Reptiles
Tortoises
Box Turtles
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Reach for the Sky
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Where rivers run uphill
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Anacondas

Anacondas are four species of aquatic boa inhabiting the swamps and rivers of the dense forests of tropical South America as well as the southern swamps of the island of Trinidad. The Yellow Anaconda can be found as far south as Argentina. Body Builder: The Anaconda come equipped with a large head and a thick neck. Its eyes and nostrils are positioned on the top of the head, enabling the Anaconda to breathe and to see its prey while its stocky body lays submerged under water. The extremely muscular Anaconda is a constrictor and is not venomous; however, it still has teeth and powerful jaws that it utilizes to clench onto its prey. It grabs its victim and pulls it underwater, drowning the prey. Specific Diets: They typically feed on large rodents, tapirs, capybaras, deer, peccaries, fish, turtles, birds, sheep, dogs and aquatic reptiles like caiman. They have been known to occasionally prey on jaguars and attacks on humans can be confirmed, although this is rare. Younger Anacondas feed on mice, rats, chicks, frogs and fish. Most local people kill these snakes on sight, out of the fear that they are man-eaters. In most instances, if an Anaconda senses humans in the area, it will retreat in another direction. Human death by Anaconda is quite rare. Surprise Attack: Anacondas are usually coiled up in a murky, shallow pool or at the river's edge. They wait to ambush their unsuspecting prey when they come down for a drink. Anacondas bite their prey with their sharp teeth, hold on with their powerful jaws and pull them under water. The victim may drown first or it may be squeezed to death in the Anaconda's muscular coils. Anacondas, true to the Boa family, constrict their hapless victims to death. The snake squeezes tighter each time its prey breathes out, so the prey cannot breath in again. Suffocation does not take long. Anacondas swallow their prey whole, starting with the head. This is so the legs fold up and the prey goes down smoothly. The Anaconda can swallow prey much bigger than the size of its mouth since its jaw can unhinge and the jaw bones are loosely connected to the skull. While the snake eats, its muscles have wave-like contractions, crushing the prey even further and surging it downward with each bite. Author: Patrick Jean. The copyright holder of this image allows anyone to use it for any purpose including unrestricted redistribution, commercial use, and modification.Need some dental work?: Just about every species of snake on earth has teeth, but the anacondas' teeth are not used for chewing. Most snakes' teeth are used for holding onto their prey, preventing them from escaping. Some snakes have venom in two specially designed, extra long teeth which they use to kill their prey. Anacondas have teeth, but they are not a venomous snake. They rely on their enormous size and power to subdue their victims. It is possible to be bitten by an anaconda, but the bite itself would not be fatal. Growth Spurts: An Anaconda, like all large species Boas and Pythons, continue to grow throughout their lives. Their growth speed reduces after reaching maturity but these snakes possibly reach 50 or 60 years of age, some maybe 80. Like almost all boas, Anacondas give birth to live young. Giant Anaconda: There are some historical reports of early European explorers of the South American jungles seeing giant anacondas up to 100 feet long and some of the native peoples of the South American jungle have reported seeing anacondas up to 50 feet long. No one has caught and measured an Anaconda anywhere near that size. Additionally, it is important to note that there is nothing in their natural habitat that could satisfy the feeding requirements of an Anaconda that size. Excess Wieght Loss: When it sheds, an adult anaconda relieves itself of an average of 2 pounds of skin. An anaconda's skin can stretch up to 30% larger than the original size of the snake.

Anacondas
Anacondas








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™