Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Behavior
Fear Matters
Making light of sleep
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Ducks
Crows
Emus
Chemistry and Materials
Salt secrets
Atomic Drive
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
The science of disappearing
Earth from the inside out
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Flower family knows its roots
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Island Extinctions
Little Bits of Trouble
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
A Big Discovery about Little People
Childhood's Long History
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Electric Eel
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math Naturals
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Gut Microbes and Weight
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Snails
Beetles
Krill
Mammals
African Elephants
Goats
Sperm Whale
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Speedy stars
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Surprise Visitor
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Rattlesnakes
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Saturn's Spongy Moon
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Searching for Alien Life
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

African Wildedbeest

 

The wildebeest, also called the gnu (pronounced "new"), is a large hooved mammal of the genus Connochaetes, which includes two species, both native to Africa. Gnus belong to the family Bovidae, which includes antelopes, cattle, goats, and other even-toed horned ungulates.

 

 


Just the Facts: Wildebeest grow to 1.15–1.4 meters (3'9"–4'7") at the shoulder and weigh between 150 and 250 kilograms. (330 and 550 pounds)

They inhabit the plains and open woodlands of southern Africa, especially the Serengeti. Wildebeest can live for more than 20 years.

What's for Dinner? The principal foodstuff of wildebeest are grasses. The seasonal nature of the African grasslands forces wildebeest to make annual migrations.

The main migration is in May, when around 1.5 million animals move from the plains to the woods; they return in November as summer rains water the plains.

All in the Family: The cows will calve in summer, on the plains. The calves can walk within minutes, and after a few days can keep up with the rest of the herd. After calving the breeding season begins. Dominant bulls defend territories marked with feces and pheromones produced by scent glands on the hooves. Subordinate males form bachelor herds.

Eco-friendly: Wildebeest are an important part of the plains ecosystem. Their dung fertilizes the ground and their eating and trampling encourage new growth. They are also an important food source for predators such as lions and hyenas.

What's in a Name? The name wildebeest finds its origin in the Dutch and Afrikaans words wild beest which means "wild animal/beast". Although the name is derived from the Dutch language, the name wildebeest doesn't officially exist in the Dutch language. The Dutch name for wildebeest is gnoe (where the Dutch "g" is pronounced) (as in: Loch).

Afrikaanders (Afrikaans speaking South-Africans) may have started using the name "Wildebeest" for the animal as they had no other name for it when it was first encountered. 'Gnu' is from a Khoikhoi language (which pronounced the [g]), which likely imitated it from the grunt-type noise that a wildebeest makes.

The pronunciation of 'gnu' was popularized in English by the comic song 'The Gnu' by Michael Flanders and Donald Swann, in which all words starting with 'n' have a 'g' prepended: 'I'm a g-nu, I'm a g-nu, the g-nicest work of g-nature in the zoo.'


'Gnu' is from a Khoikhoi language, which likely imitated it from the grunt-type noise that a wildebeest makes.

Stampede! Wildebeest stampedes are notorious for the amount of destruction they cause when they occur. An average stampede often features approximately 500 wildebeest traveling at speeds in excess of 65mph, and can often last for about 30 minutes.

African Wildedbeest
African Wildedbeest








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™