Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
Contemplating thought
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Birds
Vultures
Albatrosses
Tropical Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Getting the dirt on carbon
Diamond Glow
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
New eyes to scan the skies
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Battling Mastodons
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Out in the Cold
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
A Plankhouse Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Mako Sharks
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Recipe for Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Losing with Heads or Tails
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Snails
Wasps
Mammals
Vampire Bats
Koalas
Killer Whales
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Alligators
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Dark Galaxy
Icy Red Planet
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Crime Lab
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

African Wildedbeest

 

The wildebeest, also called the gnu (pronounced "new"), is a large hooved mammal of the genus Connochaetes, which includes two species, both native to Africa. Gnus belong to the family Bovidae, which includes antelopes, cattle, goats, and other even-toed horned ungulates.

 

 


Just the Facts: Wildebeest grow to 1.15–1.4 meters (3'9"–4'7") at the shoulder and weigh between 150 and 250 kilograms. (330 and 550 pounds)

They inhabit the plains and open woodlands of southern Africa, especially the Serengeti. Wildebeest can live for more than 20 years.

What's for Dinner? The principal foodstuff of wildebeest are grasses. The seasonal nature of the African grasslands forces wildebeest to make annual migrations.

The main migration is in May, when around 1.5 million animals move from the plains to the woods; they return in November as summer rains water the plains.

All in the Family: The cows will calve in summer, on the plains. The calves can walk within minutes, and after a few days can keep up with the rest of the herd. After calving the breeding season begins. Dominant bulls defend territories marked with feces and pheromones produced by scent glands on the hooves. Subordinate males form bachelor herds.

Eco-friendly: Wildebeest are an important part of the plains ecosystem. Their dung fertilizes the ground and their eating and trampling encourage new growth. They are also an important food source for predators such as lions and hyenas.

What's in a Name? The name wildebeest finds its origin in the Dutch and Afrikaans words wild beest which means "wild animal/beast". Although the name is derived from the Dutch language, the name wildebeest doesn't officially exist in the Dutch language. The Dutch name for wildebeest is gnoe (where the Dutch "g" is pronounced) (as in: Loch).

Afrikaanders (Afrikaans speaking South-Africans) may have started using the name "Wildebeest" for the animal as they had no other name for it when it was first encountered. 'Gnu' is from a Khoikhoi language (which pronounced the [g]), which likely imitated it from the grunt-type noise that a wildebeest makes.

The pronunciation of 'gnu' was popularized in English by the comic song 'The Gnu' by Michael Flanders and Donald Swann, in which all words starting with 'n' have a 'g' prepended: 'I'm a g-nu, I'm a g-nu, the g-nicest work of g-nature in the zoo.'


'Gnu' is from a Khoikhoi language, which likely imitated it from the grunt-type noise that a wildebeest makes.

Stampede! Wildebeest stampedes are notorious for the amount of destruction they cause when they occur. An average stampede often features approximately 500 wildebeest traveling at speeds in excess of 65mph, and can often last for about 30 minutes.

African Wildedbeest
African Wildedbeest








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™