Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Watering the Air
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Clone Wars
Cannibal Crickets
Behavior
Contemplating thought
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Birds
Waterfowl
Condors
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Ancient Heights
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
To Catch a Dragonfly
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
The Taming of the Cat
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Catfish
Goldfish
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Yummy bugs
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Hear, Hear
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Corals
Grasshoppers
Leeches
Mammals
Rats
Sea Lions
Lhasa Apsos
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Invisibility Ring
One ring around them all
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Farms sprout in cities
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Pythons
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Chaos Among the Planets
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
How to Fly Like a Bat
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Watering the Air
Add your Article

A Volcano's Deadly Ash

Every few hundred years, a sleeping giant in southern Italy awakens with a bang, spewing volcanic ash across the countryside.

The volcano, called Mount Vesuvius, formed 25,000 years ago. During its most explosive eruptions, the volcano could blanket nearby cities with hot ash, sometimes also burying them with deadly flows of mud and rocks.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Wikipedia

One famous eruption occurred nearly 2,000 years ago, in the year 79 A.D. The blast lasted 18 hours and destroyed the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, killing thousands of people as they tried to escape.

Scientists and city officials had supposed that Naples, one of Italy’s most populous cities, was far enough away that it would be safe from the volcano’s wrath. New evidence suggests that this might not be the case.

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers recently discovered 4000-year-old layers of ash and mud under present-day Naples. Just outside the city, they also uncovered abandoned villages, as well as human and animal skeletons.

Most surprising of all, the researchers say, was the discovery of thousands of footprints from the same time period, pressed into layers of wet ash that had rained from the sky. The footprints show that thousands of people were fleeing to the northwest, away from the volcano, as it erupted.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mount Vesuvius hasn’t had a major eruption since 1631, but it’s still very active. And the discovery of the ancient ash layers, skeletons, and footprints are a warning that modern Naples, a city of 3 million people, isn’t safe from the volcano after all, scientists say.

So, when the volcano begins to rumble again, Naples should have an emergency evacuation plan ready—just in case.—C. Gramling

A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Volcano's Deadly Ash








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™