Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Listening to Birdsong
Between a rock and a wet place
Mice sense each other's fear
Birds
Flamingos
Songbirds
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Look into My Eyes
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rocking the House
Recipe for a Hurricane
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Spotty Survival
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
The Taming of the Cat
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Barracudas
Perches
Eels
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Strong Bones for Life
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Setting a Prime Number Record
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
A New Touch
A Fix for Injured Knees
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Millipedes
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
African Jackal
Seal
Black Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Black Hole Journey
Road Bumps
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Springing forward
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Asp
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Killers from Outer Space
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
A Light Delay
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
A Change in Climate
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

A Volcano's Deadly Ash

Every few hundred years, a sleeping giant in southern Italy awakens with a bang, spewing volcanic ash across the countryside.

The volcano, called Mount Vesuvius, formed 25,000 years ago. During its most explosive eruptions, the volcano could blanket nearby cities with hot ash, sometimes also burying them with deadly flows of mud and rocks.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Wikipedia

One famous eruption occurred nearly 2,000 years ago, in the year 79 A.D. The blast lasted 18 hours and destroyed the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, killing thousands of people as they tried to escape.

Scientists and city officials had supposed that Naples, one of Italy’s most populous cities, was far enough away that it would be safe from the volcano’s wrath. New evidence suggests that this might not be the case.

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers recently discovered 4000-year-old layers of ash and mud under present-day Naples. Just outside the city, they also uncovered abandoned villages, as well as human and animal skeletons.

Most surprising of all, the researchers say, was the discovery of thousands of footprints from the same time period, pressed into layers of wet ash that had rained from the sky. The footprints show that thousands of people were fleeing to the northwest, away from the volcano, as it erupted.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mount Vesuvius hasn’t had a major eruption since 1631, but it’s still very active. And the discovery of the ancient ash layers, skeletons, and footprints are a warning that modern Naples, a city of 3 million people, isn’t safe from the volcano after all, scientists say.

So, when the volcano begins to rumble again, Naples should have an emergency evacuation plan ready—just in case.—C. Gramling

A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Volcano's Deadly Ash








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™