Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Sea Lilies on the Run
Cacophony Acoustics
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
Lightening Your Mood
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Robins
Falcons
Vultures
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
The memory of a material
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Galaxies on the go
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dino-bite!
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Life trapped under a glacier
Watering the Air
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
What is groundwater
Blooming Jellies
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Sahara Cemetery
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Mahi-Mahi
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Making good, brown fat
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Flu Patrol
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Sea Anemones
Mammals
African Elephants
Dolphins
Weasels and Kin
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Watering the Air
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

A Volcano's Deadly Ash

Every few hundred years, a sleeping giant in southern Italy awakens with a bang, spewing volcanic ash across the countryside.

The volcano, called Mount Vesuvius, formed 25,000 years ago. During its most explosive eruptions, the volcano could blanket nearby cities with hot ash, sometimes also burying them with deadly flows of mud and rocks.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Mount Vesuvius, as seen from the ruins of Pompeii in southern Italy.

Wikipedia

One famous eruption occurred nearly 2,000 years ago, in the year 79 A.D. The blast lasted 18 hours and destroyed the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, killing thousands of people as they tried to escape.

Scientists and city officials had supposed that Naples, one of Italy’s most populous cities, was far enough away that it would be safe from the volcano’s wrath. New evidence suggests that this might not be the case.

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

This map of a portion of southern Italy shows how ash from Mount Vesuvius could spread as far as the city of Naples (Napoli).

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers recently discovered 4000-year-old layers of ash and mud under present-day Naples. Just outside the city, they also uncovered abandoned villages, as well as human and animal skeletons.

Most surprising of all, the researchers say, was the discovery of thousands of footprints from the same time period, pressed into layers of wet ash that had rained from the sky. The footprints show that thousands of people were fleeing to the northwest, away from the volcano, as it erupted.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Footprints, preserved in ash deposits, show that thousands of people fled an eruption at Mount Vesuvius 3,780 years ago.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mount Vesuvius hasn’t had a major eruption since 1631, but it’s still very active. And the discovery of the ancient ash layers, skeletons, and footprints are a warning that modern Naples, a city of 3 million people, isn’t safe from the volcano after all, scientists say.

So, when the volcano begins to rumble again, Naples should have an emergency evacuation plan ready—just in case.—C. Gramling

A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Volcano's Deadly Ash








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™