Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Return of the Lost Limbs
Sleepless at Sea
A Sense of Danger
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Making Sense of Scents
Birds
Storks
Woodpecker
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Batteries built by Viruses
Getting the dirt on carbon
Computers
Programming with Alice
Hitting the redo button on evolution
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Digging for Ancient DNA
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Environment
Alien Invasions
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Words of the Distant Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Electric Catfish
Bass
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Moths
Tarantula
Ticks
Mammals
Pitbulls
African Wildedbeest
Beagles
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
One ring around them all
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Asp
Iguanas
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Slip Sliming Away
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

A Puffy Planetary Puzzle

Astronomers recently made a fuss about Pluto, saying that it’s not really big enough to be called a planet.  Now, they’re making a fuss about a planet that might be the largest one yet discovered.

he newfound planet is called HAT-P-1b. It’s 450 light-years from Earth and 36 percent wider than Jupiter, which is the largest planet in our solar system.

HAT-P-1b circles its parent star very closely—much more closely than Earth circles its own parent star, the sun. It also has a surprisingly low density. Although it’s bigger than Jupiter, it has only half of Jupiter’s mass. That makes it a puffy giant.

The density of HAT-P-1b is the lowest of any known planet, says codiscoverer Robert Noyes of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.

That’s very unusual for a planet, especially one that orbits its star so closely. “We have a bit of a puzzle,” Noyes says.

Astronomers found HAT-P-1b using six small, robotic telescopes. Four of the telescopes are at the Whipple Observatory in Arizona, and the other two are in Hawaii.

They detected the planet because, while orbiting, it passes directly between Earth and its parent star, the fainter member of a double-star system called ADS 16402. Each time it does this, the planet blocks a little bit of the star’s light reaching Earth.

HAT-P-1b is an extrasolar planet, which means it exists outside our solar system. It’s one of about 200 extrasolar planets that astronomers have discovered so far.

Only one other extrasolar planet has a density nearly as low as that of HAT-P-1b. Originally, some astronomers had considered this planet a fluke. Now, they have to take more seriously the idea that puffy, hot supergiants may not be that rare.—E. Jaffe

A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™