Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Middle school science adventures
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Hearing Whales
Monkeys Count
Behavior
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dino-bite!
Contemplating thought
Birds
Tropical Birds
Ospreys
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
A Light Delay
Atom Hauler
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Battling Mastodons
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rocking the House
Flower family knows its roots
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Stonehenge Settlement
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Whale Sharks
Marlin
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
How Super Are Superfruits?
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math Naturals
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Dragonflies
Camel Spiders
Mammals
St. Bernards
Beagles
Minks
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Particle Zoo
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Snakes
Gila Monsters
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Dire Shortage of Water
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

A Newspaper's Hidden Cost

It’s a morning ritual for millions of people: Wake up. Have breakfast. Read the paper.

This simple, groggy habit is taking its toll on the environment, say researchers from the University of California, Berkeley. In a recent study, they found that reading the news on a handheld computer would be much better for the planet than reading the paper version.

For their study, the researchers focused on the New York Times, which has more subscribers per 7-day week than any other newspaper in the United States. About 1.2 million subscribers get it on weekdays, and 1.7 million get the Sunday edition.

Producing the paper uses up a lot of energy and resources, the researchers found. One year’s worth of the New York Times weighs about 236 kilograms. It takes about 22,700 liters of water each year to make the paper for just one reader. The same processes release about 660 kilograms of carbon dioxide, a gas that contributes to global warming. Printing and transporting the newspaper release even more.

The researchers found that, just by trying to stay informed, a single daily reader in Berkeley contributes 270 kilograms of extra carbon dioxide to the atmosphere every year.

The New York Times also happens to be available in electronic form. People can download it through a wireless signal onto a portable little computer called a personal digital assistant (PDA), for example.

The researchers added up all of the energy that it takes to make a PDA and its batteries, recharge the batteries, and download the New York Times. They found that an individual reader using a PDA would be responsible for producing just 5 kilograms of carbon dioxide.

Clearly, it would be far more efficient if everyone took PDAs to the breakfast table instead of newspapers.

The hard part will be convincing people to get cozy with computers, when the act of turning pages or scanning the comics can be so enjoyable. And, even though it’s okay to spill cereal on the paper, a splash of juice on the PDA could be disastrous!—E. Sohn

A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™