Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Getting the dirt on carbon
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Clone Wars
Feeding School for Meerkats
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Internet Generation
Birds
Storks
Cassowaries
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Graphene's superstrength
The hottest soup in New York
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Bugs with Gas
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Bull Sharks
Eels
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Building a Food Pyramid
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
A Long Trek to Asia
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Leeches
Worms
Spiders
Mammals
Basset Hounds
African Camels
Guinea Pigs
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Project Music
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Nature's Alphabet
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Alligators
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Sounds of Titan
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Riding Sunlight
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

A New Touch

Many people who have artificial arms or legs find these devices clumsy and difficult to operate. What’s missing is the ability to think about making a movement, then having that movement happen.

Now, researchers from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and their coworkers have moved a step closer toward this goal. They have developed a technique that could eventually allow people to feel heat and other sensations through their new limbs.

In your body, the nervous system carries messages from your brain to your muscles, telling them what to do. When you want to open your fist, for example, the nerve cells in your hand receive electrical signals that make the finger muscles move.

After the amputation of a hand, however, people also lose the hand’s nerve cells—and the ability to move the limb just by thinking about it or to feel anything.

To restore nerve-activated movement, the scientists started by identifying the nerves that once led to the lost limb. They then redirected these nerves to muscles in the patient’s chest.

As a result, when the patient thought about moving her arm, the message from her brain ended up in her chest muscles instead of in her hand. The muscles twitched, and a device on the skin picked up the muscles’ signal and sent an electrical pulse to the artificial arm, which then moved.

In a recent study, the first woman to have the procedure reported that moving her artificial arm felt natural.

Scientists also went a step farther. Surgeons rewired sensory nerves that originally went to the hand to a patch of skin that covers the chest muscles. When they later pressed on various parts of this area, the patient felt tingling sensations in what seemed to be individual fingers and the palm of her missing hand.

The patient was also able to feel cold, heat, and vibrations in the lost limb when the scientists applied those sensations to the skin on her chest.

“The fact that they were able to provide this degree of use [with the artificial arm] and the potential for sensory control is really quite wonderful,” comments Gregory A. Clark, a bioengineer at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

Next, the group plans to work on developing artificial limbs that will allow their users to feel things. One possibility would be to put sensors on the artificial fingers that would deliver sensations to another part of the body.

Then, it wouldn’t matter if the hand holding a cup of hot cocoa were real or artificial. The cup would still feel hot.—E. Sohn

A New Touch
A New Touch








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™