Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Return of the Lost Limbs
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Meet your mysterious relative
Bringing fish back up to size
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Kiwis
Blue Jays
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Small but WISE
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
New twists for phantom limbs
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
Inspired by Nature
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Long Haul
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Tuna
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Math is a real brain bender
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Long Haul
Dreaming makes perfect
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Beetles
Crustaceans
Crawfish
Mammals
Manxes
Moose
Pugs
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
One ring around them all
Project Music
Speedy stars
Plants
Springing forward
Nature's Alphabet
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Alligators
Snakes
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
A Great Ball of Fire
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
A Light Delay
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Recipe for a Hurricane
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

A Moon's Icy Spray

At Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, geysers such as the famous Old Faithful regularly spout water hundreds of feet into the air. The jets are impressive, but they’re nothing compared to geysers on one of Saturn’s moons.

Images from the Cassini spacecraft, which is orbiting Saturn, show a fine spray of material (lower left) emerging from Saturn's moon Enceladus.

Images from the Cassini spacecraft, which is orbiting Saturn, show a fine spray of material (lower left) emerging from Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The tiny moon, called Enceladus, measures just 300 kilometers (186 miles) across. Recent pictures of areas near the moon’s south pole show that icy geysers shoot up another 300 kilometers, as high as the moon is wide.

The images came from the Cassini spacecraft, which has been on tour around Saturn and its many moons since July 2004.

Last July, instruments on Cassini detected a large cloud of water vapor floating above the southern polar region of Enceladus. At the time, astronomers suspected that breaks in the moon’s surface allowed ice to vaporize and fuel the cloud.

In this colorized image, the colors reveal how far out from Enceladus the moon's fountains of icy particles extend. The plumes appear to be as large as the moon itself.

In this colorized image, the colors reveal how far out from Enceladus the moon’s fountains of icy particles extend. The plumes appear to be as large as the moon itself.

NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The new images give a more specific idea of how that might happen. They also prove that the moon is geologically active.

Scientists are giddy with the discovery. “There is little that can compare to the sighting of activity on another solar system body,” says Carolyn Porco. “This has been a heart-stopper.” Porco is the Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.—E. Sohn

A Moon's Icy Spray
A Moon's Icy Spray








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™