Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Swedish Rhapsody
Fish needs see-through head
Baby Talk
Birds
Owls
Storks
Tropical Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Heaviest named element is official
Small but WISE
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Batteries built by Viruses
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fingerprinting Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Flower family knows its roots
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
The Taming of the Cat
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Whale Sharks
Flounder
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Recipe for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Math Naturals
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Sun Screen
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Corals
Beetles
Tarantula
Mammals
Squirrels
Armadillo
Canines
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Asp
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Ringing Saturn
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Weather
A Change in Climate
A Dire Shortage of Water
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine

“I promise, this won’t hurt a bit,” the doctor says, smiling. Then: jab. You’ve just gotten another shot.

If getting an injection isn’t your idea of a good time, there’s some promising news. Scientists have developed an amazing little device that could replace some injections—and pills, too.

The new device is a microchip that can be implanted in your body. The chip is about the size of a dime and is as thin as a piece of paper. On its surface are several small, sealed pockets for storing drug doses. These doses can be released into your body one by one at different times.

Each pocket is sealed with a different type of polymer, a material that has very long molecules. (Some of the natural substances in your body, such as proteins, are made of polymers.) By varying the length of the polymer molecules in the seals, the scientists can control when the drugs in each little pocket are released. Seals with longer polymer molecules take longer to break. Seals made with shorter polymer molecules will be the first to break and release drugs into your body.

With an implanted chip, you wouldn’t need to remember to take your medicine because the chip releases the drugs into your body for you, on schedule. The chip would also work well for certain types of vaccines that require several doses. Instead of making lots of trips to the doctor—and getting lots of injections—you’d only need to go once to have the chip implanted, and then the chip would take care of the rest.

So far, Robert Langer and his team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have made chips that can deliver drug doses for nearly 5 months. And after a chip has dispensed all of its medicine, it dissolves slowly inside your body.

This sort of chip isn’t available to doctors yet, but when companies start making it, your doctor will then be able to say, “This really won’t hurt a bit!”—S. McDonagh

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™