Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Professor Ant
Feeding School for Meerkats
Behavior
The Electric Brain
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Wired for Math
Birds
Chicken
Falcons
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Cold, colder and coldest ice
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Classroom of the Mind
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Ferocious Growth Spurts
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Deep History
Earth from the inside out
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
Alien Invasions
A Change in Leaf Color
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Words of the Distant Past
A Long Haul
Fish
Lungfish
Salmon
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Scholarship
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math is a real brain bender
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Music in the Brain
Flu Patrol
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Horseshoe Crabs
Fleas
Mammals
Sphinxes
Weasels
Rats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
The Particle Zoo
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fastest Plant on Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Ringing Saturn
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Catching Some Rays
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine

“I promise, this won’t hurt a bit,” the doctor says, smiling. Then: jab. You’ve just gotten another shot.

If getting an injection isn’t your idea of a good time, there’s some promising news. Scientists have developed an amazing little device that could replace some injections—and pills, too.

The new device is a microchip that can be implanted in your body. The chip is about the size of a dime and is as thin as a piece of paper. On its surface are several small, sealed pockets for storing drug doses. These doses can be released into your body one by one at different times.

Each pocket is sealed with a different type of polymer, a material that has very long molecules. (Some of the natural substances in your body, such as proteins, are made of polymers.) By varying the length of the polymer molecules in the seals, the scientists can control when the drugs in each little pocket are released. Seals with longer polymer molecules take longer to break. Seals made with shorter polymer molecules will be the first to break and release drugs into your body.

With an implanted chip, you wouldn’t need to remember to take your medicine because the chip releases the drugs into your body for you, on schedule. The chip would also work well for certain types of vaccines that require several doses. Instead of making lots of trips to the doctor—and getting lots of injections—you’d only need to go once to have the chip implanted, and then the chip would take care of the rest.

So far, Robert Langer and his team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have made chips that can deliver drug doses for nearly 5 months. And after a chip has dispensed all of its medicine, it dissolves slowly inside your body.

This sort of chip isn’t available to doctors yet, but when companies start making it, your doctor will then be able to say, “This really won’t hurt a bit!”—S. McDonagh

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™