Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Fast-flying fungal spores
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Thieves of a Feather
Walks on the Wild Side
Lives of a Mole Rat
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Mind-reading Machine
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Mockingbirds
Kiwis
Turkeys
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Silk’s superpowers
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Earth from the inside out
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Supersight for a Dino King
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Ancient Heights
Wave of Destruction
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
If Only Bones Could Speak
Writing on eggshells
Fish
Sturgeons
Pygmy Sharks
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Yummy bugs
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math Naturals
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Jellyfish
Cockroaches
Mammals
Dogs
Felines
Chihuahuas
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Invisibility Ring
Speedy stars
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Flower family knows its roots
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Lizards
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Crime Lab
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Where rivers run uphill
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

A Long Trek to Asia

Today, a plane trip from eastern Africa to China takes less than a day. Tens of thousands of years ago, it would have taken a lot longer to walk those 5,000 miles. But now it seems that even without roads, ancient people managed to make that long trip.

Our human ancestors came from eastern Africa. They started leaving that area around 60,000 years ago. Until recently, scientists weren’t sure when these roving humans first arrived in the area now known as China. Only one human skull that was more than 39,000 years old had ever been found in that part of the world.

But in 2001, local workers discovered some ancient human bones in a Chinese cave near Beijing. Paleontologists later excavated the site. Studies showed that the bones were 40,000 years old, leading the scientists conclude that people had made the long trek from Africa to China by that time.

The presence of those bones could also mean that humans and now-vanished humanlike species were interbreeding at that time. The scientists who’ve studied the Chinese skeleton say that it has features of both humans and humanlike Neandertals, which lived from 130,000 to 30,000 years ago in Europe and western Asia. The skeleton’s jaw, leg, and arm bones look like those of people today, but the teeth and hand bones are more like those of Neandertals, they say.

The idea of such interbreeding is controversial. Some scientists aren’t convinced. There just aren’t enough fossils from modern humans at that time to say for sure.

Although it was a very long walk from east Africa to China, the ancient people who made the trip may at least have had sturdy shoes. The skeleton has strong legs but delicate toes, and that means the ancient human probably wore some type of shoes—the oldest evidence of footwear ever found.—C. Gramling

A Long Trek to Asia
A Long Trek to Asia








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™