Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Getting the dirt on carbon
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Jay Watch
Mouse Songs
New Mammals
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Swine flu goes global
Birds
Kiwis
Rheas
Cardinals
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Batteries built by Viruses
Heaviest named element is official
Computers
Programming with Alice
Look into My Eyes
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
The Rise of Yellowstone
Ancient Heights
Environment
Catching Some Rays
Pollution Detective
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Childhood's Long History
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Manta Rays
Whale Sharks
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Chew for Health
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
A Better Flu Shot
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Squid
Beetles
Leeches
Mammals
Chipmunks
Dolphins
Asiatic Bears
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Dreams of Floating in Space
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Reptiles
Anacondas
Alligators
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Toy Challenge
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Earth's Poles in Peril
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

A Great Quake Coming?

Everyone who lives in San Francisco knows that earthquakes are common in the Bay Area—and they can be devastating. One hundred years ago this month, for example, a major quake destroyed about 28,000 buildings and killed hundreds, perhaps thousands of people. The ground shook for nearly a minute, and buildings burst into flame. The fires burned for days.

Residents now wonder when the next “Big One” will strike. It’s bound to happen someday. At least seven active fault lines run through the San Francisco area. Faults are places where pieces of Earth’s crust slide past each other. When these pieces slip, the ground shakes.

To prepare for that day, scientists are using new techniques to reanalyze the 1906 earthquake and predict how bad the damage might be when the next one happens.

One new finding about the 1906 quake is that the San Andreas fault split apart, or ruptured, faster than scientists had assumed at the time. During small earthquakes, faults rupture at about 2.7 kilometers per second. During bigger quakes, however, recent observations show that ruptures can happen at rates faster than 3.5 kilometers per second.

At such high speeds, massive amounts of pressure build up, generating underground (seismic) waves that can cause more damage than the quake itself. Lucky for San Francisco, these pressure pulses traveled away from the city during the 1906 event. As bad as the damage was, it could have been far worse.

Looking ahead, scientists are trying to predict when the next major quake will occur. Records show that earthquakes were common before 1906. Since then, there has been something of a lull. Patterns in the data, however, suggest that the probability of a major earthquake striking the Bay Area before 2032 is at least 62 percent.

This diagram shows when earthquakes occurred in the Bay Area and how large they were. The large bar at the left of the diagram represents the 1906 quake (magnitude 7.8). The frequency of Bay Area earthquakes larger than magnitude 5.5 dropped after the 190

This diagram shows when earthquakes occurred in the Bay Area and how large they were. The large bar at the left of the diagram represents the 1906 quake (magnitude 7.8). The frequency of Bay Area earthquakes larger than magnitude 5.5 dropped after the 190

U.S. Geological Survey

New buildings in San Francisco have to follow strict codes that stabilize them against future quakes. Still, more than 84 percent of the city’s buildings are old, weak, and vulnerable. Analyses suggest that another massive earthquake would cause extensive damage.

People who live there today tend to feel safe because San Francisco has remained pretty quiet for a while. According to the new research, however, it’s not a matter of “if” the Big One will hit. It’s just a matter of when.—E. Sohn

A Great Quake Coming?
A Great Quake Coming?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™