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Getting the dirt on carbon
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Newts
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Salamanders
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
G-Tunes with a Message
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
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Talking with Hands
A Recipe for Happiness
Swedish Rhapsody
Birds
Ospreys
Pigeons
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Getting the dirt on carbon
These gems make their own way
Computers
Nonstop Robot
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Mini T. rex
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
What is groundwater
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fakes in the museum
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Great White Shark
Marlin
Piranha
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A Taste for Cheese
Food for Life
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
The tell-tale bacteria
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Cockroaches
Sponges
Mammals
Lhasa Apsos
Pugs
Raccoons
Parents
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Road Bumps
Black Hole Journey
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Pythons
Geckos
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Solving a Sedna Mystery
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Children and Media

How children use media has a lot to do with who they are. Although no two kids are exactly alike, children generally go through the same stages of development. Knowing these stages can help you encourage your child to use media in new and creative ways.

Your 3 year old says...

  • I can tell simple stories.

    What you can do: Ask your child specific questions about what's on TV, on the computer screen and in books. As your child speaks, you might add information to help him learn new vocabulary. For example, if your child says "dog," you can say, "yes, the large, furry dog."

  • I like hearing and seeing the same story over and over again.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions about TV shows, videos and software games — even if they are favorites that he's seen a dozen times. Though you may have memorized a story, your child may still be learning it.

  • I like to sing simple songs and can carry a tune.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don't be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I can name and match basic colors, like red, blue, yellow and green. I am starting to learn shapes.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions while he's watching TV and playing on the computer. For example, point to the screen and ask: "What is that number?" "Does that door look like a rectangle or a circle?" "Do you know what color her shoes are?"

  • I like to ask who, what and why questions.

    What you can do: While watching TV shows, playing with software or visiting Web sites, explain to your child why certain events happen, who characters are and why they do the things they do.

  • I am interested in things that are the same and things that are different.

    What you can do: Point out when a TV character or animal does something physical that your child can do too — like hopping, jumping, going down a slide or walking like a monkey. Then do the motion together.

  • I want to move my body in new ways.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don't be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I enjoy helping out around the house and doing easy chores.

    What you can do: If you make a habit of covering the TV set or closing the doors to a cabinet where the computer is stored, encourage your child to be a part of that ritual.

  • I know whether I am a boy or a girl. I am learning what boys and girls are supposed to wear and what they are supposed to do.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows with gender stereotypes that teach your child that an activity is "just for boys" or "just for girls." Tell your child that both girls and boys can be anything they want to be and give specific examples.

  • I like to hear stories that are about me.

    What you can do: If you have made home videos or have a scrapbook or pictures of your child, look at them with him and talk about what happened the day you took the pictures.

  • I spend a lot of time watching what's going on around me.

    What you can do: Turn TV watching into an activity. Ask your child questions about what he sees and hears.

  • If I am around people who seem different from me, I may become curious and ask questions.

    What you can do: Choose TV shows, books and software that expose your child to people of different backgrounds. Talk to him about what makes a culture unique and special.

 Children and Media









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