Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Seeds of the Future
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
The Littlest Lemurs
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Behavior
Listening to Birdsong
Reading Body Language
From dipping to fishing
Birds
Pelicans
Vultures
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Makeup Science
Earth from the inside out
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Hubble trouble doubled
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Feathered Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Plastic-munching microbes
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Environment
The Oily Gulf
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Codfish
Parrotfish
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Chew for Health
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
Taste Messenger
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Corals
Scorpions
Giant Clam
Mammals
Boxers
Jaguars
Moles
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Road Bumps
Black Hole Journey
Speedy stars
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Seeds of the Future
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Tortoises
Rattlesnakes
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Sounds of Titan
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Machine Copy
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
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Crocodile Hearts Crocodile Hearts - Crocodile Hearts

Crocodile Hearts

Like mammal and bird hearts, a crocodile's heart is a muscle that pumps blood. One side of the heart sends blood that is full of oxygen out to most of the body. The other side pulls blood back toward the lungs to give it an oxygen refill. But crocodile ( Read More



Sea Lions

A sea lion is any of several marine mammals of the family Otariidae. Sea lions are characterized by the presence of external ear pinnae or flaps, long front flippers, and the ability to walk on four flippers on land. Read More

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a loud, continuous racket may sound strange to snorkelers, Read More

Preparing for the GSAT Exam

To do well on the GSAT exam you must first learn the material, and then review it before the test. These are techniques to better understand your material: Learning 1. Take good notes in your class lectures and textbooks. Read More

Earth from the inside out

Scientists have long known this strange fact: It’s easier to look deep into space than into the center of Earth. Light can pass through most of space, so the light from distant stars can easily be seen with the naked eye. But Earth is opaque, which means Read More

Killers from Outer Space

It happened to the dinosaurs. It could happen to us. At any moment, a giant chunk of rock could come screaming down from outer space to slam into Earth. Such an impact very likely killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Read More

Nurse Sharks

Nurse sharks are cosmopolitan carpet sharks belonging to the family Ginglymostomatidae. Common in shallow, tropical and subtropical waters of the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific, the family comprises three genera each with one species. Read More

Supergoo to the rescue

Inside a disposable diaper are tiny crystals of a material called sodium polyacrylate that can absorb hundreds of times their weight in water. Just a small amount of the stuff — sometimes called “Super Slurper” — can sop up a lot of liquid, no matter wher Read More

Whoever vs. Whomever

To determine whether to use whoever or whomever, here is the rule: him + he = whoever him + him = whomever Read More

Walktopus

Crissy Huffard spends so much time studying octopuses that they've been known to take over her life. "There were times when I'd close my eyes and see octopuses because I'd been watching them so many hours a day," Huffard says. She's a graduate student at Read More

Catching Some Rays

Harnessing the power of the sun is nothing new. People have had solar-powered calculators and buildings with solar panels for decades. But plants are the real experts: They've been using sunlight as an energy source for billions of years. Read More

Face values

You know which faces you find attractive, but why? A delicate look, a bright smile, pretty skin, big eyes — it’s hard to resist such features. It’s also hard to define them. Psychologists have been working for years to close in on the age-old question: Wh Read More

Cannibal Crickets

It sounds like the makings of a creepy movie. Swarms of insects band together and march across the landscape. They crawl over everything in their path, and they make an eerie rustling sound as they move. Along the way, they eat each other when they get th Read More

Earth's Poles in Peril

The North and South poles are remote and frigid places that receive lots of animal visitors but few human tourists. But even if you never plan to visit the polar bears in the north or penguins in the south, now is a perfect time to start thinking about th Read More

Humans

Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin for "wise man" or "knowing man") under the family Hominidae (the great apes). Like most primates, humans are by nature social. Read More

Watching deep-space fireworks

Space is full of fireworks: Galaxies smash into each other, dying stars explode and high-energy particles race toward us at the speed of light. The most powerful explosions in the universe are brilliant flashes of light called gamma-ray bursts. Read More

Deep-space dancers

If you gaze through a telescope at a distant galaxy, it may glow brightly with the light of hundreds of millions of stars. Despite all that light, most scientists think that at the center of a big galaxy lies something very dark: a black hole. Read More

A Tongue and a Half

If there were a prize for animal rudeness, a small South American bat would surely be in the running. The creature doesn't just stick out its tongue. It shoots it way, way out. In fact, its tongue is longer than its body. At 1.5 times the animal's body l Read More

Dogs

One of the first animals domesticated by ancient man, the dog has long been accurately described as "man's best friend." Read More

One ring around them all

Astronomers recently found another ring around the planet Saturn — and it’s the biggest one yet. This newly discovered ring stretches about 15 million miles across, which makes a loop big enough to fit a billion Earths inside. Read More

Heaviest named element is official

Everything on Earth that scientists can see, measure or study is made of atoms — and atoms are named by what type of element they are. You probably know the name of many elements, such as oxygen, gold or hydrogen. Others, such as cadmium or xenon, may sou Read More

Underwater Jungles

Thick forests of brown algae, called kelp, cling to the seafloor in cold waters throughout the world. There are about 100 kinds, including giant kelp, which stretch as high as 30 meters (100 feet). Read More

Return of the Lost Limbs

When people lose legs after accidents or illnesses, emergency care and artificial limbs often allow them to walk again. But salamanders and newts in the same situation don't need doctors or artificial body parts. They can grow limbs back on their own Read More

Spin, Splat, and Scramble

Having fun? Take a break and give this some thought: Science can help you play better. Read More

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Surf Watch

Surf Watch

I usually hate getting up early. But during a recent surfing trip to Mexico, I was up with the sun. I couldn't wait to get to the beach. Even so, I didn't plunge into the water right away. I watched ... Read More

Plants Travel Wind Highways

Plants Travel Wind Highways

Gusts of wind can knock you over if they blow hard enough. If you were a plant, though, the wind could carry you or your spores for thousands of kilometers. ... Read More

Spinach Power for Solar Cells

Spinach Power for Solar Cells

Popeye uses spinach to power his muscles. Now, scientists are looking to spinach as a power source for supplying electricity. A solar cell converts sunlight into electricity. ... Read More

Mockingbirds

Mockingbirds

Mockingbirds are a group of New World passerine birds best known for the habit of some species of mimicking the songs of other birds, often loudly and in rapid succession. There are 17 species in four... Read More

Bulldogs

Bulldogs

The Bulldog (often called the English Bulldog or British Bulldog) is a medium-sized dog breed that originated in England. The Bulldog is a relatively small but stocky breed, with a compact body and sh... Read More

Galaxies on the go

Galaxies on the go

Scientists have a mystery of cosmic proportions on their hands. Recently astronomers noticed something strange. It seems that millions of stars are racing at high speeds toward a single spot in the sk... Read More

Where rivers run uphill

Where rivers run uphill

Scientists think that lakes under the ice might act like giant slippery banana peels — helping the ice slide more quickly over Antarctica’s bumpy bedrock toward the ocean, where it breaks into iceberg... Read More

Storing Memories before Bedtime

Storing Memories before Bedtime

A good night's sleep may help your brain permanently file away lessons learned during the day. But, according to a new study, the brain begins processing and storing those memories long before it's ti... Read More

Hares

Hares

Hares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. Very young hares are called leverets. Hares live solitarily or in pairs. A common type of hare in arctic North America is the Snowshoe ... Read More

Fossil Forests

Fossil Forests

Fossil trees have a story to tell. Earth has been around for about 4.5 billion years. The first traces of life appeared roughly 3.7 billion years ago. Land plants finally emerged more than 3 billion ... Read More

Little Bee Brains That Could

Little Bee Brains That Could

If "birdbrain" is supposed to be an insult, then "bee brain" might be an even crueler thing to say. Bees have tiny brains, after all, so it's easy to believe that they must be dumb... Read More

Sheep

Sheep

The domestic sheep (Ovis aries), the most common species of the sheep genus (Ovis), is a woolly ruminant quadruped which probably descends from the wild mouflon of south-central and south-west Asia. I... Read More

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Scientists searching for an Earth-friendly alternative to gasoline are looking in some of the weirdest places—termite guts, cow stomachs, and rotting logs. These researchers are hunting for bacteria a... Read More

Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

You've heard it before: If you know what's good for you, you'll go to bed on time. Now, scientists are saying something more about going to sleep. And you may lose more than just TV privileges if you ... Read More

Dinosaur Dig

Dinosaur Dig

It was hot and dry when I spent the Fourth of July digging for fossils on the 5E Ranch north of Billings, Mont. This sort of weather isn't unusual in central Montana. Some parts of the state are nearl... Read More









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