Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Making the most of a meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Little Bee Brains That Could
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Clone Wars
Behavior
Ear pain, weight gain
The case of the headless ant
Double take
Birds
Swifts
Eagles
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
When frog gender flips
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Small but WISE
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Feathered Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Flower family knows its roots
Earth Rocks On
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Salt and Early Civilization
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Catfish
Skates and Rays
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Insects
Moths
Worms
Mammals
Weasels
Bats
Great Danes
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
A Giant Flower's New Family
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Iguanas
Gila Monsters
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Flying the Hyper Skies
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Watering the Air
Catching Some Rays
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Electric RayElectric Ray - Electric Ray

Electric Ray

Electric rays (order Torpediniformes) are fish that have rounded bodes and a pair of organs capable of producing an electric discharge. This shock can vary between 8 volts and 220 volts, depending on the species. Read More



Lucky Survival for Black Cats

Black cats bring bad luck, according to superstition. But the same quirks of biology that make some cats black might also have protected the dark-haired felines from diseases a long time ago. In a range of animals, from mice to sheep, scientists have alr Read More

Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider By Danielle Wood

While most schools offer some amount of circle time and fingerpaint, they are not all the same. Here's how to sort through the preschool mumbo jumbo, and pick the right place for your child. Read More

Minks

A mink is any of several furry, dark-colored, semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae, which also includes the weasels and the otters. The American Mink can be found in wooded areas and fields near streams and lakes. Read More

Crawfish

Crayfish, sometimes called crawfish, or crawdads are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. They are found in bodies of fresh water that do not freeze to the bottom, and which have shelter against harm. Read More

Platypus

The Platypus is an egg-laying, duck-billed mammal whose males have a venomous spur on the hind foot, baffled naturalists when it was first discovered. The uniqueness of the platypus makes it a recognizable symbol of Australia. Read More

Whale Sharks

The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a distinctively-marked member of the subclass Elasmobranchii of the class Chondrichthyes. It is the largest shark and also the largest living fish. Read More

Brain cells take a break

Scientists have long wanted to know what happens inside the human brain when deep asleep. You may be unconscious, but your brain cells are busy with activity. Neurons, brain cells that conduct electricity, keep your mind humming even while your body is re Read More

Flying Foxes

Bats of the genus Pteropus, belonging to the Megachiroptera sub-order, are the largest bats in the world. They are commonly known as the Fruit bat, Flying fox or Malayan Flyingfox among other numerous colloquial names. Read More

Cell Phone Tattlers

Your cell phone holds secrets about you. Besides the names and numbers that you've programmed into it, traces of your DNA linger on the device, according to a new study. Read More

Small but WISE

Anyone on Earth can look up and see the moon or stars, but it takes a telescope to get a glimpse of planets and the other bright and strange things that share our universe. Astronomers are always finding new ways to observe far-off galaxies and study the Read More

Homework blues

Homework can put you in a bad mood, and that might actually be a good thing. New research suggests that, in some cases, being too happy can hurt your performance on certain kinds of tasks. Researchers from the University of Plymouth in England wondered w Read More

St. Bernards

The St. Bernard Dog is a large breed of dog originally bred for rescue and as a working dog. A full-grown male can weigh between 150 and 200 lb. There are two varieties of the breed: the short-haired variety and the long-haired variety. Read More

Body clocks

Try this: For an entire day, forget about the clock. Eat when you’re hungry and sleep when you’re tired. What do you think will happen? You may be surprised to find that your day is much like most other days. You’ll probably get hungry when you normally Read More

Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood

Imagine cramming hundreds of thousands of bright, young stars into a space no bigger than our solar system. Talk about a traffic jam! Astronomers have observed such "super" star clusters, but only in galaxies far, far away—until now. Read More

Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert

Wally Gilbert is interested in just about everything. He began by studying physics and then switched to biology, eventually winning an Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award in 1979 and then a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1980. And very early in his s Read More

Bats

Although associated with Halloween and horror movies, bats are nothing to be afraid of. Most bats live on a diet of insects, and are a big help in keeping down the insect population, while others enjoy eating fruits and vegetables. Read More

The (kids') eyes have it

Can you believe your eyes? A recent experiment suggests that the answer to that question may depend on your age. In the experiment, kids and adults were asked to look at the same visual illusion — a picture that was designed to trick the viewer. The rese Read More

The Smell of Trust

Let's say you find yourself with a pile of extra money. You meet a banker who tells you to hand it all over to him. He'll invest it and make you rich. "Trust me," he says. Do you? Whether or not you decide to trust strangers may have something to do with Read More

Giraffes

The giraffe is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. Males can be 4.8 to 5.5 metres (16 to 18 feet) tall and weigh up to 900 kilograms (2,000 pounds). Read More

Otters

The aquatic (sometimes marine) carnivorous mammals known as otters form part of the large and diverse family Mustelidae, which also includes weasels, polecats, badgers, and others. All otters have long, slim, streamlined bodies of extraordinary grace Read More

Falcons

A Falcon is any of several species of bird of the genus Falco, such as the Peregrine Falcon which are raptors or birds of prey. These birds have thin, pointed wings, which allow them to dive at extremely high speeds. Read More

Armadillo

Armadillos are small placental mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell. All species are native to the Americas, where they inhabit a variety of environments. Read More

African Warthogs

The warthog is a wild member of the pig family that lives in Africa. They are the only widely recognised species in their genus, though some authors divide them into two species. Read More

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Mosquitos

Mosquitos

The mosquito is an insect with a pair of scaled wings, a slender body, and long legs. The females of most mosquito species suck blood from other animals. Their overall Size varies, but is rarely great... Read More

Tiny Pterodactyl

Tiny Pterodactyl

Imagine a creature that's a cross between a dinosaur and a bird and you'll have a good idea of what a pterodactyl looked like. These ancient creatures were reptiles, but they flew. In fact, they were ... Read More

Battling Mastodons

Battling Mastodons

Mastodons no longer exist, but their fossils provide glimpses of how they once lived. Researchers now say that marks on fossil tusks suggest that male mastodons fought violent battles with each other... Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. ... Read More

Subject and Verb Agreement

Subject and Verb Agreement

The basic rule states that a singular subject takes a singular verb, while a plural subject takes a plural verb. NOTE: The trick is in knowing whether the subject is singular or plural. The next tric... Read More

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Sports are fun, but they can also be dangerous. Broken bones, pulled muscles, and sprained joints are all common injuries among athletes. Now, researchers have identified another possible risk of play... Read More

New twists for phantom limbs

New twists for phantom limbs

Phantom” pain is like a ghost in the body — but it’s anything but imaginary. People who have had an arm or leg amputated can often still feel sensations of the missing limb, even though it’s no longer... Read More

Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style

Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style

Try to wrestle an alligator underwater, and you'll probably lose. It's not just that the average gator—at 11 feet long and close to 1,000 pounds—is a whole lot bigger than you are. It turns out alliga... Read More

Macaws

Macaws

Macaws are large colorful New World parrots, classified into six of the many Psittacidae genera: Ara, Anodorhynchus, Cyanopsitta, Propyrrhura, Orthopsittaca, and Diopsittaca. They are the largest bird... Read More

Parrotfish

Parrotfish

Parrotfishes are mostly tropical, perciform marine fish of the family Scaridae. Abundant on shallow reefs of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, the parrotfish family contains ten genera and abou... Read More

Wasps

Wasps

Wasp is the common name applied to most species of hymenopteran insects, except bees and ants. Insects known as wasps include the sawflies, the parasitic wasps, and the stinging wasps, which are the b... Read More

These gems make their own way

These gems make their own way

Tom Chatham’s desk is littered with gemstones. Rubies, sapphires, and emeralds are scattered like pieces of candy. Some of them are as big as golf balls. We’re sitting on the seventh floor of a build... Read More

Science loses out when ice caps melt

Science loses out when ice caps melt

t’s hard to imagine a mountain range without snow-covered peaks. But that may soon be the case in countries in or near the tropics. Studies show that the ice that sits atop the world’s highest mountai... Read More

Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost

Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost

No matter how hard you push yourself, you probably still can’t run as fast as some of your friends. Even with tons of training, most of us could never be Olympians. ... Read More

Pondering the puzzling platypus

Pondering the puzzling platypus

The first European scientist who saw a platypus thought it was a fake. In the late 18th century, British scientist George Shaw received a package from the governor of Australia. Shaw found strange th... Read More









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