Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Awake at Night
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Sea Lilies on the Run
Behavior
Reading Body Language
Dino-bite!
Slumber by the numbers
Birds
Nightingales
Doves
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Heaviest named element is official
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The Book of Life
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Springing forward
Earth's Poles in Peril
Environment
Whale Watch
A Change in Climate
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Meet your mysterious relative
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Parrotfish
Sturgeons
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Food for Life
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Spit Power
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Flatworms
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
Echidnas
Kodiak Bear
Humpback Whales
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Electric Backpack
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Nature's Alphabet
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Caimans
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Catching a Comet's Tail
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
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WhalesWhales - Whales

Whales

Gentle giants of the open oceans, whales are among the earth's oldest and largest creatures. Living in a watery world so far removed from our own, our understanding of whales is still advancing, and mysteries still surrounding their behavior. Read More



Reading Body Language

It's natural to greet friends with a smile and a wave. When you do this, your face and body work together to show your friends that you're happy to see them. But what happens if your face and body send mixed messages? Would someone be more likely to belie Read More

The Color of Health

Nature is full of color, from rainbows and roses to butterfly wings and peacock tails. Even the fruits and vegetables you eat often have distinctive colors: intensely blue blueberries, deeply red strawberries, and richly green broccoli. Read More

Giant Clam

The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) or traditionally, pa’ua, is the largest living bivalve mollusc. Stationary in adulthood, the creature's mantle tissues act as a habitat for the symbiotic single-celled dinoflagellate algae from which it gets its food. Read More

Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010 By KINGSTON (JIS)

The Ministry of Education revealed Tuesday (July 6) that 82 scholarships, including 33 Government scholarships, have been awarded to successful 2010 GSAT students from primary, all-age, junior high and preparatory schools, islandwide. Read More

Swine flu goes global

If you live in the United States, it’s likely that swine flu has been found in your state. As of May 5, 403 people in 38 states have been diagnosed with novel influenza A (H1N1), commonly known as the Swine flu. Those numbers are likely to increase, acc Read More

An Icy Blob of Fluff

The collision between a projectile, launched from the spacecraft Deep Impact, and Comet Tempel 1 on July 4th was pretty exciting. But the excitement didn't end there. Read More

Unnatural Disasters

On Aug. 29, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the southeastern United States and dumped more than a foot of rain in some places. Gusts of wind topped 140 miles per hour, and the ocean rose as high as 20 feet above its normal level. Floods followed, leaving N Read More

Marsupials

Marsupials are identified by one very important characteristic: they carry and nurse their young in a pouch. Marsupial babies are born blind and helpless, with no hair and with small forearms that are barely developed. Read More

Walrus

Walruses are members of the order Carnivora and suborder (or alternatively superfamily) Pinnipedia. They are the only members in the family Odobenidae. Read More

Tiny Pterodactyl

Imagine a creature that's a cross between a dinosaur and a bird and you'll have a good idea of what a pterodactyl looked like. These ancient creatures were reptiles, but they flew. In fact, they were probably the first vertebrates to fly. Pterodactyls co Read More

Turtles

Most turtles can pull their legs, tail, and head into the shell for protection. Turtles are among the most long-lived animals on the planet, and some zoo turtles reaching ages over 150 years. Read More

Ponies

The term "pony" can be used in general (or affectionately) for any small horse, regardless of its actual measurements, or breed. However, some equine breeds are not considered ponies, even if they are under 14.2 hh. Read More

Have shell, will travel

Many modern animals, like crabs, live in shells and carry their homes around with them. Picture one of these animals in your mind, and you may have some idea of what the first land-dwelling animals looked like. After studying strange marks that accompany Read More

Musclebots Take Some Steps

You've probably heard of robots. Now, make way for musclebots. Scientists in California have made tiny walking machines out of heart muscle grown from rat cells. When the muscle contracts, then relaxes, the musclebot takes a step. Read More

Pumping Up Poison Ivy

It itches and oozes. With its red bumps, a poison ivy rash can make you miserable. A new study suggests that rising levels of the gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could make poison ivy grow faster and become more toxic. Read More

Some Dinos Dined on Grass

When dinosaur poop is preserved, it's like a time capsule. The fossilized lumps contain clues about what the reptiles were eating long ago. Recent analyses of fossilized dino droppings unearthed in India have turned up at least five types of grasses. The Read More

Message in a dinosaur's teeth

Spinosaurs were large, meat-eating dinosaurs whose fossilized remains are often found in the same areas as the bones of tyrannosaurs (such as Tyrannosaurus rex). Fans of the movie Jurassic Park III may remember the spinosaur as the cranky dinosaur — the o Read More

Hot Summers, Wild Fires

A wood fire can be handy when you're camping. You can roast marshmallows or stay warm, for example. Forest fires that rage out of control, however, are a big problem. Wildfires cause hundreds of millions of dollars in damage every year. And the amount of Read More

Bats

Although associated with Halloween and horror movies, bats are nothing to be afraid of. Most bats live on a diet of insects, and are a big help in keeping down the insect population, while others enjoy eating fruits and vegetables. Read More

An Ancient Feathered Biplane

When the Wright Brothers lifted off at Kitty Hawk in 1903, they flew a plane with two sets of wings, one below the other. Their feat went down in history as the first successful flight by a heavier-than-air aircraft. New evidence suggests that dinosaurs Read More

Praying Mantis

A praying mantis, or praying mantid, is an insect of the order Mantodea, named for their "prayer-like" stance. The word mantis derives from the Greek word for prophet. There are approximately 2300 species world-wide; most are tropical or subtropical. Read More

Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders

Talk about winging it. The albatross is an amazing glider. In windy weather, these ocean birds can stay airborne for hours without flapping their enormous wings. They've been known to follow ships for days to feed on garbage. Today, there are about 17 sp Read More

From Chimps to People

It can be fascinating to watch chimpanzees at the zoo. Chimps are the closest, living animal relatives to people. Watching them can be like watching ourselves. Read More

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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers

What Not to Say to Emerging Readers By Amy Mascott

Learn the best (and avoid the worst) phrases to encourage an emerging reader.... Read More

Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch

Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch

Cartoon superheroes have included bats, spiders, and turtles. It may be time to add frogs to the list of animals that have special powers. Scientists have found signs of ultrasonic communication in a... Read More

From Mammoth to Modern Elephant

From Mammoth to Modern Elephant

Thousands of years ago, an elephant-like creature called the woolly mammoth roamed Earth. Except for fossilized bones and remains found trapped in ice, it's now gone. Scientists have long wondered whe... Read More

Shrimps

Shrimps

True shrimp are small, swimming crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. A number of more or less unrelated crustaceans also have t... Read More

Dino-Dining Dinosaurs

Dino-Dining Dinosaurs

Living with dinosaurs would have been terrifying—even for them. Some of the giant reptiles may have actually eaten each other. About 70 million years ago, dinosaurs called Majungatholus atopus roamed... Read More

Face values

Face values

You know which faces you find attractive, but why? A delicate look, a bright smile, pretty skin, big eyes — it’s hard to resist such features. It’s also hard to define them. Psychologists have been wo... Read More

Look into My Eyes

Look into My Eyes

If you look deep into a friend's eyes, you may imagine that you can see his or her thoughts and dreams. But more likely, you'll simply see an image of yourself—and whatever lies behind you. Our eyeb... Read More

Minks

Minks

A mink is any of several furry, dark-colored, semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae, which also includes the weasels and the otters. The American Mink can be found in wooded areas... Read More

Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around

Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around

The tiny bugs that can cause disease often have ingenious ways of spreading themselves around. Now, scientists have figured out how one particular parasite does it—by forcing its host sand fly to spit... Read More

Sphinxes

Sphinxes

The Sphynx (aka Canadian Hairless) is a rare breed of cat with extremely little fur and no whiskers (vibrissae). Their skin is the color their fur would be, and all the usual cat marking patterns may ... Read More

Weekend Weather Really Is Different

Weekend Weather Really Is Different

Do you ever feel like the weather is out to get you? All week long, it seems, you sit inside at school while the sun shines outside. Then, as soon as the weekend comes, the sky turns gray. There's rai... Read More

Healing Honey

Healing Honey

Coughs, sniffles, sneezes, runny noses: Colds and other nasty lung infections are especially common in winter. To fight the misery, many people swallow syrups and pills that claim to clear stuffy nose... Read More

Treating peanut allergy bit by bit

Treating peanut allergy bit by bit

Peanut allergies are among the most common and most dangerous food allergies. A tiny exposure to peanuts can mean big trouble for a person with a peanut allergy, with symptoms ranging from sneezing or... Read More

Dogfish

Dogfish

Dogfish sharks are characterized by smooth dorsal fin spines, teeth in upper and lower jaws similar in size. The spiny dogfish or piked dogfish is a type of small shark and one of the best known of th... Read More

Making the most of a meal

Making the most of a meal

For decades, people have been telling each other, “You are what you eat” — meaning that the nutrition in a person’s diet affects his or her health. It doesn’t mean, for example, that if you eat a plan... Read More









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