Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Getting the dirt on carbon
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Toads
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
The Littlest Lemurs
Big Squid
Behavior
Lightening Your Mood
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Mind-reading Machine
Birds
Waterfowl
Hummingbirds
Flightless Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
Heaviest named element is official
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
It's a Small E-mail World After All
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Meet your mysterious relative
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Weird, new ant
Flower family knows its roots
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Environment
Inspired by Nature
When Fungi and Algae Marry
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
A Long Trek to Asia
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Salmon
White Tip Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Play for Science
Math of the World
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Germ Zapper
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Black Widow spiders
Mussels
Mammals
Sphinxes
Moles
Yorkshire Terriers
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Shape Shifting
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Catching Some Rays
A Change in Climate
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Springing forwardSpringing forward - Springing forward

Springing forward

It's not just Daylight Savings Time that came early this year. All around the world, spring seems to be coming sooner than it used to. It hasn't moved up on the calendar — but many cycles in nature are telling us that spring just can't wait to be sprung. Read More



African Warthogs

The warthog is a wild member of the pig family that lives in Africa. They are the only widely recognised species in their genus, though some authors divide them into two species. Read More

The Taste of Bubbles

What does fizz taste like? In bubbly beverages like soda or champagne, tiny bubbles give the drink a lift — and have a distinct taste. Scientists have long wondered how we taste these bubbles. In a new study on mice, scientists have connected that fizzy-t Read More

Big Fish in Ancient Waters

Small things have been in the news a lot lately. First came word of a species of little people who lived in Indonesia tens of thousands of years ago (see http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20041103/Note2.asp ). Then, scientists announced the disc Read More

The Disappearing Newspaper

What's black and white and read all over? Not newspapers, at least not anymore. In fact, if you're like most young people, you probably don't read the newspaper at all. In one recent survey, just 19 percent of 18-to-34-year-olds said they read a newspape Read More

A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales

In 1989, an oil tanker called the Exxon Valdez struck an underwater reef in Prince William Sound, a large body of water in southern Alaska. The ship dumped about 11 million gallons of crude oil into the freezing water, creating the largest spill in U.S. h Read More

Antelope By Antelope

Antelopes are a group of herbivorous African and Asian animals of the family Bovidae, distinguished by a pair of hollow horns on their heads. There are many different species of antelope which range from the tiny Royal antelope to the Giant eland. Read More

Lighting goes digital

Computers have transformed our lives so completely that it’s difficult to remember what life was like before the digital age. But only a few decades ago, people used typewriters for writing, and calculators solved math and money issues. You couldn’t pull Read More

Life under Ice

Deep below a thick slab of floating ice off Antarctica, an astounding community of creatures has surprised scientists who had expected to find nothing there. In December 2003, researchers drilled a hole through the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica. They pic Read More

Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders are also called wind scorpions and sun spiders. Most live in tropical or semitropical regions where they inhabit warm and arid habitats, but some species have been known to live in grassland or forest habitats. Read More

Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer

If you want to know the temperature outside, you look at a thermometer. If you want to know what temperatures were like thousands of years ago, you have to be more creative. In the area around the Grand Canyon, two researchers from Arizona have been piec Read More

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure out where the gem came from in the first place. Now, r Read More

Bats

Although associated with Halloween and horror movies, bats are nothing to be afraid of. Most bats live on a diet of insects, and are a big help in keeping down the insect population, while others enjoy eating fruits and vegetables. Read More

Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards

Getting a phone call from a friend when you're sick can act just like a steaming bowl of chicken soup. It feels good just to know that someone cares. Read More

Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales

Walk along a wild, rocky stretch of the Washington State coast and you might catch a glimpse of a furry creature bobbing on its back in the waves. The basking animal is likely to be a sea otter. Read More

If Only Bones Could Speak

Language is one trait that separates people from other animals. Words give us the power to communicate complicated ideas, and this skill has taken us far. Read More

Dinosaurs Grow Up

One day, you realize that you can reach a shelf you could never get to before. Pretty soon, you're buying new clothes every few months because the old ones are too short or too tight. Before you know it, you can stare directly into the eyes of your teache Read More

Insects

The largest and most diverse animals on earth, insects encompass over 925,000 different species. They range in size from less than a millimeter to over 18 centimeters, and come in an endless variety of shapes and colors. Read More

Storing Memories before Bedtime

A good night's sleep may help your brain permanently file away lessons learned during the day. But, according to a new study, the brain begins processing and storing those memories long before it's time for bed—and continues to do so even while you're thi Read More

Undercover Detectives

It sounds like the beginning of a mystery movie: Last month, researchers traveled to the French countryside in search of hidden works of art. But this is no Hollywood blockbuster—at least not yet. It's a real-life mystery being tackled by a team of engin Read More

Cardinals

The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds living in North and South America. These are robust, seed-eating birds, with strong bills. They are typically associated with open woodland. The sexes usually have distinctly different. Read More

Calculating crime

When you think about math, you probably don’t think about breaking the law, solving mysteries or finding criminals. But a mathematician in Maryland does, and he has come up with mathematical tools to help police find crooks. People who solve crimes look Read More

Hitting the redo button on evolution

People have always wondered why plants and animals are built the way they are. Charles Darwin, an Englishman who lived in the 1800s, was very curious about the shape of life forms, and did lots of experiments to find some answers. He came up with the theo Read More

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The Buzz about Caffeine

The Buzz about Caffeine

You're drinking lots of cola at a party, when suddenly it hits: You! Are! Hyper! You jump around. You talk too fast. You laugh so hard that soda squirts out of your nose. Later, you can't fall asleep,... Read More

The bug that may have killed a dinosaur

The bug that may have killed a dinosaur

Sue is a famous Tyrannosaurus rex whose skeleton lives in the Field Museum in Chicago. Small, smooth holes in Sue’s jawbones have been a scientific mystery for years, and scientists want to know how t... Read More

Glider

Glider

The genus Petaurus contains flying phalangers or wrist-winged gliders, a group of arboreal marsupials. There are six species, Sugar glider, Squirrel glider, Mahogany glider, Northern glider, Yellow-be... Read More

Chinchillas

Chinchillas

Chinchillas are small rodents native to the Andes mountains in South America and belonging to the family Chinchillidae. In Chinese, they are called lóng māo, which literally means "drago... Read More

GSAT Scholarship

GSAT Scholarship By Petrojam Limited

Petrojam Limited has over the past three years awarded two scholarships to the top performing boy and girl in the GSAT examination from Greenwich All Age School.... Read More

Saving Africa's Wild Dogs

Saving Africa's Wild Dogs

For Gregory Rasmussen, a typical workday starts just before sunrise. The wildlife conservation biologist studies African painted dogs in Zimbabwe, and that's when these endangered animals usually wake... Read More

Fish needs see-through head

Fish needs see-through head

The fish in the picture is alive and you’re looking inside its head. Really. It’s not a medical freak. Just a kind of fish with a naturally see-through forehead. A new species, you might think. But n... Read More

Color-Changing Bugs

Color-Changing Bugs

A variety of animals can dramatically change the colors of their bodies to blend with the environment or to ward off predators, among other reasons. Such creatures, including chameleons and squid, us... Read More

Alligators

Alligators

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. There are two living alligator species: the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese Alligator ... Read More

Memory by Hypnosis

Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and myst... Read More

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step... Read More

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes are a group of venomous New World snakes, genera Crotalus and Sistrurus. They belong to the class of venomous snakes known commonly as pit vipers. There are nearly thirty species of rattl... Read More

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine

A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine

If getting an injection isn't your idea of a good time, there's some promising news. Scientists have developed an amazing little device that could replace some injections—and pills, too. ... Read More

Revving Up Green Machines

Revving Up Green Machines

People love their "zoom, zoom." In the United States alone, 17 million new cars hit the road in 2004. But the freedom to travel anywhere, anytime in a car or truck comes at a price. And it'... Read More

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers, crickets and katydids are in order Orthoptera. Their size ranges from 5mm to 100mm. Most of them have highly developed hind legs, much stronger and larger than the other four legs, used ... Read More









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