Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Awake at Night
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Polar Bears in Trouble
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Night of the living ants
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Vultures
Rheas
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
Pencil Thin
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Computers
Supersonic Splash
Look into My Eyes
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Goldfish
Bass
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Making good, brown fat
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math of the World
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
What the appendix is good for
Germ Zapper
Invertebrates
Beetles
Snails
Tapeworms
Mammals
Asian Elephants
African Jackal
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Springing forward
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Asp
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
A Clean Getaway
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Catching Some Rays
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Packing FatPacking Fat - Packing Fat

Packing Fat

In developed parts of the world, from Australia to Europe to the United States, waistlines are bulging. People weigh more than ever before. Even children are joining the ranks of the obese in record numbers, and scientists are concerned. Read More



Monkeys in the Mirror

Some days, when you view yourself in the mirror, you might look really good. Other days, you might not be so happy with what you see. Either way, you know who you're looking at: You. Capuchin monkeys have a different experience, a recent study discovered Read More

A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away

Looking up into the sky is like being in a time machine. Light traveling from the most distant stars and galaxies can take billions of years to reach Earth, so we see them now as they were a long, long time ago. Read More

What is a Preposition?

A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition. A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its Read More

Bionic Bacteria

Sometimes inanimate objects appear to act as if they're alive. Doors suddenly slam shut on their own, lights flicker on and off, or refrigerators gurgle and gasp. It's the spooky stuff of science fiction and horror movies. Get used to the idea. Read More

Surviving Olympic Heat

It's going to be hot over there. At this summer's Olympic Games in Athens, temperatures will soar into the 90s. The air will be humid, sticky, and laden with pollution. It'll be hard to breathe, hard to stay cool, hard to keep hydrated. Read More

Corals

Corals (class Anthozoa), which include sea anemones (order Actiniaria), are gastrovascular marine cnidarians existing as small sea anemone-like polyps, typically forming colonies of many individuals. Read More

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Make way for a new kind of stunt-creature: ants. Some tree-dwelling ants that live in the tropics can twist themselves in the air to change the direction of their tumbles when they fall. They end up catching on to the trunk and climbing back home. It's l Read More

Baboons

The baboons are some of the largest non-hominid members of the primate order; only the mandrill and the drill are larger. The word "baboon" comes from "babouin", the name given to them by the French naturalist Buffon. Read More

Sheep

The domestic sheep (Ovis aries), the most common species of the sheep genus (Ovis), is a woolly ruminant quadruped which probably descends from the wild mouflon of south-central and south-west Asia. In sheep husbandry, a group is called a flob. Read More

Sticky Silky Feet

Comic book superhero Spider-Man uses tiny hairs on his fingertips to climb up walls. But he could have had another secret weapon to help him stick. Scientists have now found that some spiders can also make silk in their feet, which may sometimes help the Read More

Brain cells take a break

Scientists have long wanted to know what happens inside the human brain when deep asleep. You may be unconscious, but your brain cells are busy with activity. Neurons, brain cells that conduct electricity, keep your mind humming even while your body is re Read More

Chimpanzees

The chimpanzee is the common name for the two living species in the genus Pan: The common Chimpanzee and The Bonobo. Pan troglodytes, the Common Chimpanzee, lives in West and Central Africa. Read More

A Seabird's Endless Summer

It's that time of year again. Many of the birds that have filled our backyards, parks, and forests with song are packing up and heading south for the winter. For some songbirds, the trip may be as short as a jaunt from southern Wisconsin to Georgia. Othe Read More

The Incredible Shrunken Kids

The smallest kids on Earth are much smaller than you or your baby brother or sister. They're smaller than a flea. They're even smaller than the hairs on a flea's leg. These tiny tykes are so small, in fact, that 20 billion billion of them can fit into a j Read More

Electricity's Spark of Life

Lots of kids get scared when their bedroom lights go out at night. When an entire city goes dark, many more people start to worry. Read More

African Wild Dog

The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), also called African Hunting Dog or Painted Hunting Dog, is a mammal of the Canidae family, and thus related to the domestic dog. Read More

A Stormy History

In the past few years, hurricanes such as Charlie, Frances, and Katrina have brought destruction and heartache to the southeastern United States. A new analysis, however, suggests that the number of severe hurricanes we've seen recently is normal. Read More

Ibises

Ibises are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae. They all have long down curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. Read More

Body clocks

Try this: For an entire day, forget about the clock. Eat when you’re hungry and sleep when you’re tired. What do you think will happen? You may be surprised to find that your day is much like most other days. You’ll probably get hungry when you normally Read More

Beyond Bar Codes

In the future, your refrigerator might alert you when the milk has gone sour. At the grocery store, cashiers won't need to scan bar codes because products will provide the data on their own. Read More

Blue Jays

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a North American jay, a handsome bird with lavender-blue to mid-blue feathering from the top of the head to midway down the back. There is a pronounced crest on the head. Read More

Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants

Birds are famous for carrying things from place to place. Some, like homing pigeons, can be trained to deliver messages and packages. Other birds unknowingly carry pollen, burrs, and seeds that latch on for the ride. Read More

Toy Challenge

You probably have a favorite game that you just can't wait to play. Your friends might have their own ideas about what's fun and what's not. Have you ever thought about joining forces and creating a game that everyone would love? Read More

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A Pepper Part that Burns Fat

A Pepper Part that Burns Fat

Diet fads come and go, but in the end, there’s really only one rule for losing weight: Burn more energy than you consume. In April, scientists from California reported on a chemical that might help pe... Read More

Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs

Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs

Male prairie dogs are normally fast and tough. They can easily avoid predators. But that's when they're not in love. Scientists who spent years studying a colony of about 100 prairie dogs in Utah dis... Read More

Kiwis

Kiwis

A kiwi is any of the species of small flightless birds endemic to New Zealand of the genus Apteryx (the only genus in family Apterygidae). At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi are by far the... Read More

Minks

Minks

A mink is any of several furry, dark-colored, semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae, which also includes the weasels and the otters. The American Mink can be found in wooded areas... Read More

Perches

Perches

Perch are a group of freshwater fish belonging to the family Percidae. Perch have "rough" or ctenoid scales. When looking through a microscope, the scales look like plates with growth rings ... Read More

Revving Up Green Machines

Revving Up Green Machines

People love their "zoom, zoom." In the United States alone, 17 million new cars hit the road in 2004. But the freedom to travel anywhere, anytime in a car or truck comes at a price. And it'... Read More

Springing forward

Springing forward

It's not just Daylight Savings Time that came early this year. All around the world, spring seems to be coming sooner than it used to. It hasn't moved up on the calendar — but many cycles in nature ar... Read More

Attacking Asthma

Attacking Asthma

One minute, you're breathing normally. The next minute, you're coughing, wheezing, and gasping for air. Maybe the trouble started when you stroked a cat. Or maybe it happened when you raced for a socc... Read More

Labradors

Labradors

The Labrador Retriever ("Labrador" or "Lab" for short), is one of several kinds of retriever, and is the most popular breed of dog (by registered ownership) in both the United Stat... Read More

Bloodhounds

Bloodhounds

A Bloodhound (also known as the St. Hubert Hound) is a large breed of dog bred for the specific purpose of tracking human beings. Consequently, it is often used by authorities to track escaped prisone... Read More

Untangling Human Origins

Untangling Human Origins

According to the scientific theory of evolution, apes and people have a common ancestor—one ancient animal from which both species evolved. ... Read More

The Oily Gulf

The Oily Gulf

On the night of April 20, an explosion rocked the Deepwater Horizon. The Deepwater Horizon was a huge building or platform in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico used to drill oil from deep below the oce... Read More

Undercover Detectives

Undercover Detectives

It sounds like the beginning of a mystery movie: Last month, researchers traveled to the French countryside in search of hidden works of art. But this is no Hollywood blockbuster—at least not yet. It... Read More

Goldfish

Goldfish

The goldfish was one of the earliest fish to be domesticated, and is still one of the most commonly kept aquarium fish. It may grow to a maximum length of 23 inches (59 cm) and a maximum weight of 6.6... Read More

Improving the Camel

Improving the Camel

When I signed up for a 2-day camel trek during my recent trip to India, I was worried that the camel would spit at me, throw me off its back, or run full speed into the desert as I clutched its neck f... Read More









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