Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Clone Wars
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
The (kids') eyes have it
Pain Expectations
Birds
Emus
Storks
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Graphene's superstrength
Heaviest named element is official
Computers
Programming with Alice
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Watering the Air
Environment
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The Wolf and the Cow
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Meet your mysterious relative
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Salmon
Skates
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Healing Honey
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Monkeys Count
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Cell Phone Tattlers
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Camel Spiders
Crustaceans
Mammals
Killer Whales
Gazelle
St. Bernards
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
One ring around them all
Powering Ball Lightning
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Lizards
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
The two faces of Mars
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Watering the Air
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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SkatesSkates - Skates

Skates

Skates are cartilaginous fishes belonging to the family Rajidae in the superorder Batoidea of rays. They are carnivorous, feeding mostly on smaller fish and crustaceans. Read More



Diamond Glow

Diamonds are expensive because they're beautiful and rare. But fake diamonds often sell for a lot of money, too, because they can look very real. Now, scientists have discovered a way to distinguish certain genuine diamonds from imitations. The simple ne Read More

Deep-space dancers

If you gaze through a telescope at a distant galaxy, it may glow brightly with the light of hundreds of millions of stars. Despite all that light, most scientists think that at the center of a big galaxy lies something very dark: a black hole. Read More

Killer Whales

The Orca (Orcinus orca) is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family Delphinidae. They are sometimes referred to as blackfish, a group including Pilot whales, Pigmy and False killer whales and Melon headed whales. Read More

The Science Fair Circuit

For some kids, entering science fairs is like eating cookies. It's hard to stop at just one. The research is interesting, these students say. The competitions are exciting, and you can win prizes. Best of all, joining the science fair circuit is a great Read More

Spotty Survival

Northern spotted owls live in the western parts of northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. They roost in stands of trees that are hundreds of years old. Read More

Moon Crash, Splash

There are many ways to study the moon: Look through a telescope, measure its movement across the sky, or watch for mountains (with special sunglasses) as it passes across the sun during an eclipse, for example. But here’s one way that’s a little unusual: Read More

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Read More

Sounds of Titan

Visiting a mysterious, alien world is usually just the stuff of dreams or science fiction stories. For many scientists around the world, the dream came true last month when a space probe touched down for the first time on the surface of Saturn's moon Read More

Groundwater and the Water Cycle By http://www.groundwater.org/kc/gwwatercycle.html

Now that you have learned about the exciting world of groundwater, it is time to see how it fits into that endless watery process called the water cycle, also known as thehydrologic cycle. Read More

Primates

Primates make up a small but diverse number of species, including human beings. Primates have hands or paws that are able to grasp items, fingernails instead of claws, and eyes that face forward (instead of being located on either side of the head.) Read More

Pollution at the ends of the Earth

No roads lead to Kuujjuaq. You can only get to this village, high in the Canadian Arctic, by boat or plane. The trees here are stunted and small, but the bears grow big. The 500 kids who live in Kuujjuaq (pronounced KOO-joo-ak) have unusual chores: they h Read More

Smiles Turn Away Colds

Want to stay away from colds? Put on a happy face. Compared to people with bad attitudes, people who are cheerful and relaxed are less likely to suffer from colds, according to a new study. Read More

Sperm Whale

The Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is the largest of all toothed whales and is believed to be the largest toothed animal to ever inhabit Earth, measuring up to 18 m (60 ft) long. Read More

The Book of Life

So far, scientists have named about 1.8 million living species, and that's just a fraction of what probably exists on Earth. With so many plants, animals, fungi, and other organisms covering the planet, it can be tough to figure out what type of spider is Read More

Skunks

Skunks are moderately small mammals with black-and-white fur belonging to the family Mephitidae and the order Carnivora. The two skunk species in the Mydaus genus inhabit Indonesia and the Philippines; all other skunks inhabit the Americas. Read More

Owls

An owl is a member of any of 222 currently known species of solitary, mainly nocturnal birds of prey in the order Strigiformes. Owls mostly hunt small mammals, insects, and other birds, though a few species specialize in hunting fish. Read More

The Taming of the Cat

There are black cats, spotted cats, fat cats, and scaredy cats. Now, scientists have found what may be one of the first pet cats ever. Read More

Reading Body Language

It's natural to greet friends with a smile and a wave. When you do this, your face and body work together to show your friends that you're happy to see them. But what happens if your face and body send mixed messages? Would someone be more likely to belie Read More

On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists

In a lab at the University of Maryland in College Park last month, flames leaped and swirled in front of five middle school students. To create the fire tornado, the students first set fire to a piece of alcohol-soaked gauze in a dish. Then, they spun th Read More

Polar Ice Feels the Heat

Can you feel the world getting warmer? Maybe you can’t, but ice across the planet’s surface has certainly been feeling the heat, according to new reports. Indeed, the dramatic shrinkage of Arctic ice—and at some spots, its seasonal near disappearance—is o Read More

Making light of sleep

Maybe this has happened to you: In the middle of class, while you pretended to be paying attention to the teacher’s lecture, your eyelids started to droop. You began having second thoughts about staying up late on Facebook the night before. Don’t be too Read More

Seagulls

Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae), and more distantly to the waders, auks and skimmers. Most gulls belong to the large genus Larus. Read More

Missing Moose

For many years, moose were a mystery to me. On camping trips, I'd see fresh tracks and droppings, but no moose. On car trips, other people would see them and I'd be looking the wrong way. When I was 18, a friend and I traveled through New England to Cana Read More

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Tortoises

Tortoises

A tortoise is a land-dwelling reptile of the order Testudines.Just the Facts: Like its aquatic cousins, the turtle and the terrapin, the tortoise is shielded from predators by a shell. Most land torto... Read More

Ponies

Ponies

The term "pony" can be used in general (or affectionately) for any small horse, regardless of its actual measurements, or breed. However, some equine breeds are not considered ponies, even i... Read More

Cell Phone Tattlers

Cell Phone Tattlers

Your cell phone holds secrets about you. Besides the names and numbers that you've programmed into it, traces of your DNA linger on the device, according to a new study. ... Read More

Ready, Set, Supernova

Ready, Set, Supernova

Stars explode all the time in outer space, but astronomers usually see the explosions only after they've happened. One type of stellar explosion, called a supernova, can glow for days or even months. ... Read More

New eyes to scan the skies

New eyes to scan the skies

Four hundred years ago, an Italian scientist named Galileo Galilei became the first person to see the craters on the moon. Galileo, who also observed four of Jupiter’s moons and the rings of Saturn, w... Read More

From dipping to fishing

From dipping to fishing

Chimpanzees not only share our ability to use tools. They also share our ability to create tools for a specific purpose. A group of Japanese scientists recently witnessed this inventiveness in action.... Read More

Dragonflies

Dragonflies

Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands because their larvae, known as... Read More

Planets on the Edge

Planets on the Edge

My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas. Many kids use this short sentence (or something like it) to remember the names of the planets in order of their distance from the sun. The first let... Read More

The science of disappearing

The science of disappearing

For inspiration, you could hit the books: In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena wore an invisibility cap during the Trojan War. The same cap helped the half-god Perseus, who wore it to hide from Medu... Read More

The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes

The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes By Michael Sizer

Make time for nursery rhymes and read about the surprising benefits of rhyming.... Read More

Crocodile Hearts

Crocodile Hearts

Like mammal and bird hearts, a crocodile's heart is a muscle that pumps blood. One side of the heart sends blood that is full of oxygen out to most of the body. The other side pulls blood back toward ... Read More

Roboroach and Company

Roboroach and Company

When you see a cockroach scurry across the floor or a lobster crawl over sand in an aquarium tank, you probably don't think of robots. Robots are machines. People build and program them to assemble ca... Read More

Fishy Sounds

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a l... Read More

Wildcats

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western... Read More

Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease

Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease

Chomping at a juicy hamburger might be a little less tempting than it once seemed. It took just one case of mad cow disease, discovered in December, to make several countries ban imports of U.S. beef.... Read More









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