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Flush-Free Fertilizer
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
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Frogs and Toads
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Fishing for Giant Squid
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Red Apes in Danger
Behavior
Making light of sleep
The case of the headless ant
Baby Number Whizzes
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Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
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Hitting the redo button on evolution
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New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Tiny Pterodactyl
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
The Rise of Yellowstone
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
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Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fakes in the museum
Fish
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Skates and Rays
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Chew for Health
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
It's a Math World for Animals
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Fix for Injured Knees
Heavy Sleep
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Sponges
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Termites
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Cocker Spaniels
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Project Music
Dreams of Floating in Space
Extra Strings for New Sounds
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Flower family knows its roots
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Assembling the Tree of Life
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Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Moons
A Dusty Birthplace
An Icy Blob of Fluff
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Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Where rivers run uphill
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
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Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxietyGSAT Mathematics Quiz,Teaching Math, teaching anxiety - GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety

GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety By Stephen Ornes

Going to school means learning new skills and facts in such subjects as GSAT Language Arts, GSAT Math, GSAT Science, GSAT Social Studies, GSAT Communications. Teachers teach and students learn, and many scientists are interested in finding ways to Read More



Swans

Swans are large water birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae. Adult swan diets are almost entirely vegetarian. Read More

Horses

Horses first evolved in the Americas , but went extinct there until reintroduced by Europeans. While isolated domestication may have occurred as early as 10,000 years ago, the first clear evidence dates to c. 5000 BC. Read More

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery

It's not easy living inside an intestine. But some creatures are happiest in the warm and juicy confines of other animals' digestive systems. A tapeworm called Hymenolepis diminuta, for instance, can live for years in a rat's intestine. Read More

Calculating crime

When you think about math, you probably don’t think about breaking the law, solving mysteries or finding criminals. But a mathematician in Maryland does, and he has come up with mathematical tools to help police find crooks. People who solve crimes look Read More

Hawks

True hawks are any of the species in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. The widespread Accipiter genus includes goshawks, sparrowhawks, the Sharp-shinned Hawk and others. Read More

When Fungi and Algae Marry

Despite their reputation as scientific curiosities, lichens have a practical side. Throughout history, people have used different species to make dyes for fabrics, poisons for arrowheads, and "green"-smelling scents for perfumes. Read More

African Gorillas

The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling herbivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. Gorillas are divided into two species and (under debate as of 2006) either four or five subspecies. Read More

The Other Side of the Zoo Fence

Architects often have to deal with difficult clients, but Lee Ehmke's customers are especially hard to work for. They sleep through meetings. They never pay. They don't even use bathrooms when they have to go. Read More

Rocking the House

Imagine what it might be like if you were in your bedroom during an earthquake. Your bed shakes. Books and stuffed animals tumble from shelves. Your computer monitor skitters across your desk and crashes to the floor. The walls creak and groan as they fle Read More

A Whale's Amazing Tooth

The narwhal looks as if it belongs in a fairy tale. Or maybe a myth. This unusual whale has a long, straight tooth, or tusk, that resembles the horn of a unicorn. Most male and some female narwhals have such a tusk. It sticks out from the left side of the Read More

The memory of a material

Nafion is a useful material that has been around since the 1960s, but don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of it. It was first made by a chemist at DuPont, a company that makes chemicals, and it is a common ingredient in fuel cells. (Fuel cells, which Read More

A Light Delay

Scientists from Harvard University recently demonstrated a way to catch and release light—but it’s not easy. In other words, no one will be using the new method to play a game of catch with flashlight beams anytime soon. The researchers were able to build Read More

Challenging the Forces of Nature

A tsunami is approaching the beach. Time is running out. In just 20 minutes, it'll be all over. "We should start focusing on how to prevent the tsunami," says 14-year-old Anudeep Gosal of Orlando, Fla. His teammates, all 12-to-14-year-olds, are drawing o Read More

Seeds of the Future

On an unusual old farm in New York City, workers are stashing away the seeds of the future. In this unlikely place, researchers are putting the seeds from flowering plants and trees in a sleeplike state called suspended animation. Many years from now, ot Read More

Early Birds Ready to Rumble

Who needs parents? Not some prehistoric baby birds! Baby birds living in the age of dinosaurs might not have been as helpless as are songbird nestlings today, who constantly call out for their parents. Instead, some of these ancient youngsters were born Read More

Detecting True Art

Real or fake? In the world of art, that can be an expensive question. Famous paintings by classic artists can sell for millions of dollars. To make a quick buck, people sometimes try to sell paintings that are imitations of the real thing. Read More

Weird, new ant

In the Amazon rainforests of Brazil, scientists have discovered a peculiar new species of ant. The insect has no eyes. Its body is pale. And its fanglike mouthparts are longer than the rest of its head. If you happened to cross paths with the bizarre ant Read More

Antelope By Antelope

Antelopes are a group of herbivorous African and Asian animals of the family Bovidae, distinguished by a pair of hollow horns on their heads. There are many different species of antelope which range from the tiny Royal antelope to the Giant eland. Read More

Swine flu goes global

If you live in the United States, it’s likely that swine flu has been found in your state. As of May 5, 403 people in 38 states have been diagnosed with novel influenza A (H1N1), commonly known as the Swine flu. Those numbers are likely to increase, acc Read More

Peafowl

The term peafowl can refer to any of three species of bird in the genera Pavo and Afropavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are most notable for the male's extravagant tail, which it displays as part of courtship. The male is the peacock. Read More

Doberman Pinschers

The Doberman or Doberman Pinscher is a breed of domestic dog. Dobermans are commonly used as guard dogs, watch dogs, or police dogs. Dobermanns are one of the most recognizable breeds, both because of their actual roles in society and stereotyping. Read More

Gaining a Swift Lift

Watch a bird soar above the trees or swoop in for a graceful landing. It turns out that the same air movements that allow a mosquito to buzz around your ear or a ladybug to land on your shoulder may also help a bird fly. Read More

Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker

It's a boy! That's the sort of news that biologists working to save endangered kakapo parrots in New Zealand probably aren't happy to hear all the time. The population of kakapo parrots currently numbers about 86 birds. Scientists have been trying to find Read More

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The Taming of the Cat

The Taming of the Cat

There are black cats, spotted cats, fat cats, and scaredy cats. Now, scientists have found what may be one of the first pet cats ever. ... Read More

Childhood's Long History

Childhood's Long History

You're lucky. Compared to other animals, you get to be a kid for a long time before you have to strike off on your own. Recent studies suggest that people have been enjoying long childhoods for many t... Read More

A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks

A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks

Between Mars and Jupiter, a band of rocks and dust orbits our sun. Astronomers call it the asteroid belt, and they think that it contains scraps of rock left over from a time when the planets formed n... Read More

Writing on eggshells

Writing on eggshells

From graffiti to wallpaper to the geometric shapes used to decorate buildings, people have been making designs out of patterns for a long time. Designs can be just for looks, or they can be used to co... Read More

Watching deep-space fireworks

Watching deep-space fireworks

Space is full of fireworks: Galaxies smash into each other, dying stars explode and high-energy particles race toward us at the speed of light. The most powerful explosions in the universe are brillia... Read More

Fishy Cleaners

Fishy Cleaners

Coral reef fish don't take showers. Instead, they swim over to tiny "cleaner" fish, which nibble off their crusty skin deposits. Everyone wins. The little fish get a meal, and their visitors... Read More

Swifts

Swifts

Swifts are the most aerial of birds and some, like the Common Swift, even sleep and mate on the wing. Larger species, such as white-throated needletail, are amongst the fastest flyers in animal kingdo... Read More

Ospreys

Ospreys

The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a medium to large raptor, which is a specialist fish-eater with a worldwide distribution. It is often known by other colloquial names such as fishhawk, seahawk or Fis... Read More

Hearing Whales

Hearing Whales

Ears are for hearing—everyone knows that. But for a creature called the Cuvier's beaked whale, hearing starts in the throat, a new study finds. The observation might help explain how all whales hear,... Read More

Supersonic Splash

Supersonic Splash

Supersonic means faster than the speed of sound, which is about 760 miles per hour in air. That’s a speed limit that can be broken — by jets and bullets, for example, or by the space shuttle as it ret... Read More

Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert

Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert

Wally Gilbert is interested in just about everything. He began by studying physics and then switched to biology, eventually winning an Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award in 1979 and then a Nob... Read More

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Cookies, soda, candy, chocolate: It can be hard to resist the temptation of sugary-sweet treats and drinks. But sugar is high in calories, and eating too much of it can cause weight gain and other he... Read More

Blooming Jellies

Blooming Jellies

Forget snowball fights. Imagine throwing globs of jellyfish at your friends. In some Middle Eastern countries kids have been known to toss jellyfish bits at each other when the gooey creatures wash up... Read More

Charged cars that would charge

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the Ameri... Read More

Cactus Goo for Clean Water

Cactus Goo for Clean Water

People need water to survive, and the water has to be clean—or they get very sick. Clean water, however, can be hard to come by. Now, scientists are exploring a clever way to make dirty water clean fo... Read More









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