Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Watching out for vultures
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Behavior
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Double take
Memory by Hypnosis
Birds
Roadrunners
Lovebirds
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Salt secrets
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Supersonic Splash
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Coral Gardens
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
A Stormy History
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
If Only Bones Could Speak
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Halibut
Whale Sharks
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math Naturals
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Disease Detectives
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Dust Mites
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Domestic Shorthairs
Siamese Cats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Invisibility Ring
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Fastest Plant on Earth
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Alligators
Black Mamba
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Lessons from a Lonely TortoiseLessons from a Lonely Tortoise - Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise

Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise

At first glance, the world's rarest creature looked just like a big boulder. I had scanned a large, plant-filled enclosure several times before locating him: a 70-something-year-old tortoise named Lonesome George. Read More



Baboons Listen for Who's Tops

You're probably pretty good at recognizing people's voices and responding in a suitable way. If you hear anger in a parent's voice, for instance, you might cool it for a while. When you hear your teacher walking down the hall toward the classroom, it's pr Read More

Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds

Inside a shiny new machine in suburban Melbourne, Australia, tiny particles are whizzing around at nearly the speed of light. The football-field–size machine, called a synchrotron, uses tubes, magnets, vacuum pumps, and other gadgetry to produce intensel Read More

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Read More

Babies Prove Sound Learners

It can be hard to know what newborns want. They can't talk, walk, or even point at what they're thinking about. Yet babies begin to develop language skills long before they begin speaking, according to recent research. And, compared to adults, they devel Read More

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's temperate oceans. Read More

A Dead Star's Dusty Ring

In 5 billion years, the sun will swell into a huge ball that will fry Earth or even swallow it up. Our star's outer layers will then fly off, and its core will shrink into a dense, fading object called a white dwarf. Read More

Your inner Neandertal

The entire genetic code of a species is called its genome, and it is a list of all the important genes in the species’ DNA. These genes contain the instructions for how to build proteins, and proteins perform specific functions in a cell. Read More

African Gorillas

The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling herbivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. Gorillas are divided into two species and (under debate as of 2006) either four or five subspecies. Read More

Deep Krill

A little over a year ago, scientists lowered a camera to the bottom of the Southern Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. The video images from that camera surprised them. Three thousand meters (9,800 feet) below the surface of the sea, the researchers obse Read More

Ferrets

In general use, a ferret is a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo), a creature first bred from the wild European polecat at least 2,500 years ago. Contrary to popular belief, ferrets are not rodents, but members of the mustelid family. Read More

The Taming of the Cat

There are black cats, spotted cats, fat cats, and scaredy cats. Now, scientists have found what may be one of the first pet cats ever. Read More

Dinosaurs Grow Up

One day, you realize that you can reach a shelf you could never get to before. Pretty soon, you're buying new clothes every few months because the old ones are too short or too tight. Before you know it, you can stare directly into the eyes of your teache Read More

Freshwater Fish

Fish -- both wild and domestic -- can be divided into two categories: saltwater and freshwater. Freshwater fish live in fresh bodies of water (like lakes, streams and rivers) rather than oceans, or other bodies with a high salt content. Read More

Earth's Poles in Peril

The North and South poles are remote and frigid places that receive lots of animal visitors but few human tourists. But even if you never plan to visit the polar bears in the north or penguins in the south, now is a perfect time to start thinking about th Read More

Mother-of-Pearl on Ice

Pearls are some of the more beautiful examples of nature's strength. The gemstones grow inside oysters, and they are remarkably sturdy and tough. Now, scientists have found a way to copy what oysters have been doing all along. They've made a pearl-like m Read More

Cheetah

The Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is an atypical member of the cat family (Felidae) that hunts by speed rather than by stealth or pack tactics. It is the fastest of all land animals and can reach speeds of up to 70 mph (112 km/h). Read More

Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. Read More

Calculating crime

When you think about math, you probably don’t think about breaking the law, solving mysteries or finding criminals. But a mathematician in Maryland does, and he has come up with mathematical tools to help police find crooks. People who solve crimes look Read More

Labradors

The Labrador Retriever ("Labrador" or "Lab" for short), is one of several kinds of retriever, and is the most popular breed of dog (by registered ownership) in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Read More

Gliders in the Family

Watching monkeys at the zoo can be fascinating because the animals' actions are so similar to those of people. Along with gorillas, orangutans, lemurs, and others, monkeys belong to a group of mammals called primates. People are primates, too. Now, scien Read More

Ponies

The term "pony" can be used in general (or affectionately) for any small horse, regardless of its actual measurements, or breed. However, some equine breeds are not considered ponies, even if they are under 14.2 hh. Read More

Hagfish

A hagfish is a marine chordate of the class Myxini, also known as Hyperotreti. Despite their name, there is some debate about whether they are strictly fish, since they belong to a much more primitive lineage than any other fish group. Read More

Lovebirds

A lovebird (genus Agapornis, Greek for "lovebird") is a very social and affectionate parrot. The name "lovebird" stems from these birds' affectionate natures. Many lovebirds are green, although color mutations can feature many different colors. Read More

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Puberty gone wild

Puberty gone wild

Breakouts, mood swings and sudden growth spurts: Puberty can be downright awkward. Even if you’re not of the human species. Puberty is a period in which humans move from childhood to adulthood. Durin... Read More

Rover Makes Splash on Mars

Rover Makes Splash on Mars

A robot on Mars has just turned up the best evidence yet that liquid water once flowed on the Red Planet. Because water is thought to be necessary for life, the discovery should help researchers pinpo... Read More

Doberman Pinschers

Doberman Pinschers

The Doberman or Doberman Pinscher is a breed of domestic dog. Dobermans are commonly used as guard dogs, watch dogs, or police dogs. Dobermanns are one of the most recognizable breeds, both because of... Read More

Extra Strings for New Sounds

Extra Strings for New Sounds

You've heard of pianos, violins, and guitars. Now, make room for the tritare (rhymes with guitar). Canadian mathematicians have invented the new music-making device by tweaking the standard concept of... Read More

Settling the Americas

Settling the Americas

The world was a very different place tens of thousands of years ago. People didn't yet inhabit many regions that are crowded today.... Read More

Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Drinking sugary soda gives you a burst of energy. Some day, sugar might power electronic equipment as well. That's because scientists have now found a way to turn sugar into electricity. ... Read More

Play for Science

Play for Science

Daniel Kunkle spent most of his time in graduate school playing with a colorful puzzle called a Rubik's Cube. And for 20 years, Jonathan Schaeffer worked on winning at checkers. The two researchers w... Read More

Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?

Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, wrote William Shakespeare in the play Romeo and Juliet. But what would astronomers say about a planet by any other name? ... Read More

Copybees

Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fa... Read More

Bee Heat Cooks Invaders

Bee Heat Cooks Invaders

Have you ever noticed how warm you get at concerts, street fairs, and other big-crowd events? Body heat from all those people really adds up. Body heat can be so powerful that some honeybees in Asia ... Read More

Pitbulls

Pitbulls

The Pit bull is not a specific breed of dog, but rather a term used to describe several breeds of dogs with similar physical characteristics. ... Read More

Forests as a Tsunami Shield

Forests as a Tsunami Shield

It's been a banner year for natural disasters. Tsunamis and hurricanes, in particular, have battered homes, destroyed cities, and taken thousands of lives. Areas along the oceans have been slammed esp... Read More

Hamsters

Hamsters

A hamster is a rodent belonging to subfamily Cricetinae. The subfamily contains about 18 species, classified in six or seven genera. Most have expandable cheek pouches, which reach from their cheeks t... Read More

Prime Time for Broken Bones

Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened ge... Read More

Diamond Glow

Diamond Glow

Diamonds are expensive because they're beautiful and rare. But fake diamonds often sell for a lot of money, too, because they can look very real. Now, scientists have discovered a way to distinguish ... Read More









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