Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Gliders in the Family
New Monkey Business
Walktopus
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
The case of the headless ant
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Birds
Tropical Birds
Kingfishers
Hummingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Silk’s superpowers
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Games with a Purpose
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Environment
Bald Eagles Forever
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Chicken of the Sea
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Skates
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Food for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
It's a Math World for Animals
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Foul Play?
A Fix for Injured Knees
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Lice
Scorpions
Millipedes
Mammals
Echidnas
Dingoes
Sun Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Gaining a Swift Lift
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Lizards
Snakes
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
A Light Delay
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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MuleMule - Mule

Mule

A mule is the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse. In height and body, shape of neck and croup, uniformity of coat, and teeth, it appears equine. It has the voice neither of the donkey nor of the horse, but emits a feeble hoarse noise. Read More



A Meal Plan for Birds

If you want to make waffles for breakfast, you have to plan ahead. First, you need to stock up on ingredients at the grocery store. Then, you need to mix the batter and remember where you stashed the waffle iron. Birds don't make waffles, but the results Read More

Rottweilers

A Rottweiler is a medium large, robust and powerful dog breed, originating from Germany. The breed is black with clearly defined tan markings on the cheeks, muzzle, chest, legs, and eyebrows. Read More

Revenge of the Cowbirds

Cowbirds are famous for their wily ways. These North American birds sneak into the nests of other birds, lay their eggs, and quickly escape before the owners return. They don't do any of the hard work it takes to raise chicks. Read More

Carp

A carp is any of various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is the most common and best-known species of carp. Carp have been spread widely and often illegally. Read More

Phantom Energy and the Big Rip

Imagine the universe being torn to shreds: Stars and galaxies tear away from each other. Earth escapes from the sun. Tiny molecules pop apart with explosive force. New analyses show that the world could end in just such a doomsday scenario. Read More

Bald Eagles Forever

Trouble for bald eagles and other birds began when farmers began to use a chemical called DDT, which protected crops from insects but also killed birds and made the shells of their eggs dangerously thin. Read More

Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem

Lakes can be like bowls of soup in the microwave: They need a little stirring every now and then. Otherwise, all the heat ends up on top. That’s exactly what’s happened in recent years to Africa’s Lake Tanganyika, scientists are reporting. Rising water t Read More

Results of GSAT are in schools this week By Teach It To Kids GSAT Jamaica

Education Minister Ronald Thwaites said while the average scores in the various subjects written in this year sitting of the Grade Six Achievement Test – GSAT - have improved over the last six years, the levels were not satisfactory. Read More

GSAT stars reap scholarship glory By Nadisha Hunter, Gleaner Writer

Thirty-three students who churned out remarkable scores in this year's Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) have reaped the benefits with government scholarships. Read More

Cold, colder and coldest ice

Most people know what happens at 0º Celsius (or 32 º Fahrenheit): Water freezes. When the temperature outside is below freezing, for example, a rain storm may become a blizzard of snow. A glass of water left in the freezer eventually becomes a glass of ic Read More

Arctic Algae Show Climate Change

Tiny creatures in remote lakes are adding to the evidence for global warming. Most scientists agree that the climate is heating up. Studies of environments all over the world show that the warming has wide-ranging effects.A recent study focused on changes Read More

Nature's Alphabet

Kjell Sandved was sitting on a tree branch in Panama when he found himself staring into the face of a viper. The poisonous snake had coiled its body a few times around a nearby branch. Its neck rested on the coils. Read More

Prairie Dogs By Prairie Dogs

Prairie dogs are small, stout-bodied, burrowing rodents with shallow cheek pouches native to the grasslands of North America. The name "prairie dog" came from their bark-like call, not from their appearance. Read More

Gut Microbes and Weight

Health experts have long worried about the increasing rate of obesity in kids. It's an important concern: Being very overweight or obese during childhood can lead to serious problems normally seen in adults, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Read More

Don't Eat That Sandwich!

If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. Read More

Hot Pepper, Hot Spider

Hot peppers and painful spider bites don't seem to have much in common. Both, however, can cause a similar burning sensation. New research now suggests a reason why. A chemical in hot peppers and different ones in spider venom happen to activate the same Read More

The Secret Lives of Grizzlies

The first time Lynne Nelson entered a den of hibernating grizzly bears, she felt a little nervous. The captive bears had known her since they were babies, but they hadn't eaten in weeks. And each young-adult animal weighed more than 150 pounds. They weren Read More

Games with a Purpose

There's a new kind of game on the Internet. When you play it, you do more than simply rack up points or have fun. As you play, you help computers develop new skills. Computer scientist Luis von Ahn created the games as a way to solve problems that are di Read More

Waterfowl

Birds are excellent adapters, evolving both physically and behaviorally to exist in a variety of different environments. While you may think of birds as being creatures of the air, waterfowl are an example of birds adapting to their environments. Read More

Life under Ice

Deep below a thick slab of floating ice off Antarctica, an astounding community of creatures has surprised scientists who had expected to find nothing there. In December 2003, researchers drilled a hole through the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica. They pic Read More

How Much Babies Know

Babies can seem pretty helpless. They can't talk or use a spoon properly. They can't go to the bathroom by themselves. A long time ago, you were a baby yourself. But you've made the transition from crying infant to independent kid. As you've grown, your Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. Read More

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. Read More

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The newest superheavy in town

The newest superheavy in town

Scientists around the world are on a quest to find all the elements possible in the universe. Everything is made of elements, so understanding elements is a way of understanding all the matter around ... Read More

Recipe for a Hurricane

Recipe for a Hurricane

Last August, Charley ripped through Florida. The hurricane tore up trees, wiped out houses, and caused more than $7 billion in damage. At about the same time, a series of typhoons killed at least 40 ... Read More

Sting Ray

Sting Ray

Dasyatids swim with a "flying" motion, propelled by motion of their large pectoral fins (commonly referred to as "wings"). Their stinger is a razor-sharp, barbed or serrated cartil... Read More

Earthworms

Earthworms

Earthworm is the common name for the larger members of the Oligochaeta in the phylum Annelida. Folk names for earthworm include "dew-worm", "night crawler" and "angleworm"... Read More

Copperhead Snakes

Copperhead Snakes

Adult specimens have a coppery colored head and neck. They are not large snakes, generally about 50 cm long (1.5 ft), but specimens up to 1 m long (3 ft) have been encountered. The body is thin by pit... Read More

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Make way for a new kind of stunt-creature: ants. Some tree-dwelling ants that live in the tropics can twist themselves in the air to change the direction of their tumbles when they fall. They end up ... Read More

Mouse Songs

Mouse Songs

For some people, the sight of a mouse can be reason to scream. For other mice, the same sight can be reason to sing. Rodents will probably never sing their way to Broadway, but researchers from Washi... Read More

Girls are cool for school

Girls are cool for school

Everyone knows by the second grade that boys have germs and girls have cooties. But at least for boys, new research says cooties might actually be good for you. According to a new study, preschool bo... Read More

Moths

Moths

A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. Both are of the order Lepidoptera. Most species of moths are nocturnal, but there are crepuscular (twilight-dwelling) and diurnal (day-dwelling) s... Read More

Toads

Toads

A distinction is often made between frogs and toads on the basis of their appearance, prompted by the convergent adaptation among so-called toads to dry environments, which often entails a brown skin ... Read More

Insects

Insects

The largest and most diverse animals on earth, insects encompass over 925,000 different species. They range in size from less than a millimeter to over 18 centimeters, and come in an endless variety o... Read More

Model Plane Flies the Atlantic

Model Plane Flies the Atlantic

When Maynard Hill decided he wanted to fly a model airplane across the Atlantic Ocean, no one took him seriously.... Read More

Domestic Shorthairs

Domestic Shorthairs

A Domestic shorthaired cat (DSH) is the proper name for a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or belong to a recognized cat breed. Domestic shorthaired cats are characterized by a wide range... Read More

The chemistry of sleeplessness

The chemistry of sleeplessness

When the school year starts, it can be tough to switch from lazy summer mornings to the blaring buzz of an alarm clock. After a few early mornings, extreme fatigue might make you feel like you’re goin... Read More

Talking with Hands

Talking with Hands

Thumbs up. A friendly wave. A threatening fist. All these hand gestures are part of the body language that we use to communicate every day. ... Read More









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