Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
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Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
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Monkeys Count
Professor Ant
Awake at Night
Behavior
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
How Much Babies Know
Honeybees do the wave
Birds
Pheasants
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Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Batteries built by Viruses
Hitting the redo button on evolution
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The Book of Life
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Middle school science adventures
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Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Supersight for a Dino King
Have shell, will travel
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Earth
Coral Gardens
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
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Improving the Camel
Alien Invasions
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Stonehenge Settlement
Writing on eggshells
Fish
Skates and Rays
Lungfish
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Monkeys Count
Detecting True Art
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
What the appendix is good for
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Flatworms
Wasps
Mammals
Armadillo
Elk
African Leopards
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
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The Particle Zoo
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
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Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Crime Lab
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on a Rocky Road
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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SpidersSpiders - Spiders

Spiders

Spiders are predatory invertebrate animals with two body segments, eight legs, no chewing mouth parts and no wings. All spiders produce silk, a thin, strong protein strand extruded by the spider from spinnerets. Read More



Elephant Mimics

It's time to revise the old saying, "Monkey see, monkey do." According to new research, you could also say, "Elephant hear, elephant do." Read More

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure out where the gem came from in the first place. Now, r Read More

Eels

True eels are fish of the order Anguilliformes, which consists of 4 suborders, 19 families, 110 genera and 400 species. Most eels are predators. Depending on their species, eels can reach from 10 cm to 3 m, and weigh up to 65 kg. Read More

It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and i Read More

What is a Verb?

The verb is perhaps the most important part of the sentence. A verb or compound verb asserts something about the subject of the sentence and express actions, events, or states of being. The verb or compound verb is the critical element of the predica Read More

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

In English grammar, words that refer to people, places, or things are called nouns. They can be classified in many ways. One way to classify nouns is according to whether they can be counted or not. Many English mistakes are related to this point. Read More

Supersight for a Dino King

The movie Jurassic Park has a scary scene in which a Tyrannosaurus rex growls right into the faces of two characters. One person tells the other not to worry because T. rex can't see things that don't move. Bad advice. A scientist now suggests that T. rex Read More

Slumber by the numbers

Itís an important question: ďOn an average school night, how many hours of sleep do you get?Ē More than 12,000 high school students were recently asked that during a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The overall answer: not enough Read More

Llamas

The Llama skull generally resembles that of Camelus, the relatively larger brain-cavity and orbits and less developed cranial ridges being due to its smaller size. The nasal bones are shorter and broader, and are joined by the premaxilla. Read More

Seen on the Science Fair Scene

Every spring, more than 1,000 high school students from around the world compete for millions of dollars in scholarships and other prizes at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). But prizes aren't the competition's only draw. Scien Read More

The Mirror Universe of Antimatter

Had a fight with your parents or a bad day at school? Wouldn't it be nice to step through a mirror to enter a different, yet somehow familiar world on the other side? Read More

A Dire Shortage of Water

If it were up to me, the weather would be hot and sunny every day. Good thing it's not up to me. Earth needs rain and snow. Without a reliable supply of water, we would have nothing to drink, nothing to sustain our crops. Swimming pools would be empty. Read More

Marlin

The marlin is a large game fish. It has an elongated body up to 2.5 m long, a spearlike snout, and a long rigid dorsal fin which extends forwards to form a crest. Marlins are fast swimmers, occurring in all seas and hunting small and large fish. Read More

Felines

Felines a family of carnivorous mammals, varying widely in size, coloration, and behavior, although a few physical similarities apply. Feline bodies are normally long and slender, with muscles suited to running, leaping and climbing. Read More

Sting Ray

Dasyatids swim with a "flying" motion, propelled by motion of their large pectoral fins (commonly referred to as "wings"). Their stinger is a razor-sharp, barbed or serrated cartilaginous spine which grows from the ray's whip-like tail. Read More

Firefly Delight

Summer is a magical time. I love the vivid flowers, the brilliant sunsets, and, perhaps most amazing of all, the bright flashes of fireflies dancing in the night. In my fascination with fireflies, I'm not alone. Read More

A Newspaper's Hidden Cost

It's a morning ritual for millions of people: Wake up. Have breakfast. Read the paper. This simple, groggy habit is taking its toll on the environment, say researchers from the University of California, Berkeley. Read More

A brain-boosting video game

In the video game Tetris, players try to pack as many shapes as possible into a small space. According to a new study, thatís not all theyíre doing: Scientists found a connection between playing Tetris and the size of part of the brain. Read More

A Recipe for Happiness

It feels good to be happy. Laughing is fun. And most people like to have a good time. "If you ask people what they want for their children, most say, 'I want them to be happy,'" says psychologist and happiness researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky of the Universi Read More

Mouse Songs

For some people, the sight of a mouse can be reason to scream. For other mice, the same sight can be reason to sing. Rodents will probably never sing their way to Broadway, but researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have found evidence that Read More

Talking with Hands

Thumbs up. A friendly wave. A threatening fist. All these hand gestures are part of the body language that we use to communicate every day. Read More

Deers

A deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. Deer are widely distributed, and hunted, with representatives in all continents except Australia, Antarctica, and Africa. Their flesh, for which they are hunted, is called venison. Read More

Searching for Alien Life

On a clear night, go outside, lie on your back, and stare into the sky. As you gaze at the multitude of stars, you might wonder: Is there life on other planets out there? Read More

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A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"

A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"

Distant planets tend to be pretty camera-shy. Astronomers have found evidence of more than 125 planets around other stars in the universe, but no one has ever seen one directly. ... Read More

The man who rocked biology to its core

The man who rocked biology to its core

When the baby Charles Darwin arrived in the world, on February 12, 1809, modern science was also an infant. Chemists had begun talking about things called atoms. But nobody knew what atoms really were... Read More

Cassowaries

Cassowaries

Cassowaries (genus Casuarius) are very large flightless birds native to the tropical forests of New Guinea and northeastern Australia. Some nearby islands also have small cassowary populations.... Read More

Monkeys Count

Monkeys Count

Monkey see, monkey hear, monkey count. Rhesus monkeys can match the number of faces they see to the number of voices they hear, a new study shows. This finding suggests that monkeys can keep track of... Read More

Shape Shifting

Shape Shifting

Using a cell phone, you can hear your friend when she calls. With a video camera or picture phone, you can also see her. ... Read More

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Cookies, soda, candy, chocolate: It can be hard to resist the temptation of sugary-sweet treats and drinks. But sugar is high in calories, and eating too much of it can cause weight gain and other he... Read More

Decoding a Beverage Jar

Decoding a Beverage Jar

It's a good thing that people in one ancient Chinese town didn't always thoroughly rinse out their beverage jars. Now, the leftover liquid that soaked into the pottery more than 8,000 years ago is pro... Read More

Snails

Snails

The name snail applies to most members of the molluscan class Gastropoda that have coiled shells .These snails are of herbivorous nature. Snails move like earthworms by alternating body contractions ... Read More

Taking a Spill for Science

Taking a Spill for Science

A cartoon character slips on a banana peel. On a TV show featuring home videos, people spin and tumble while trying to dance on a slippery floor. Your friend topples into a swimming pool while retriev... Read More

From Stem Cell to Any Cell

From Stem Cell to Any Cell

For maybe a day, about 9 months before you were born, you were just one cell. Then you were two identical cells. Then you were four. Then eight. ... Read More

Computers with Attitude

Computers with Attitude

It's been a long day at school. You've got a heavy evening of homework ahead. You switch on your computer to work on an assignment. An animated kid on your computer screen smiles and says, "Hey, ... Read More

Fishy Sounds

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a l... Read More

Gliders in the Family

Gliders in the Family

Watching monkeys at the zoo can be fascinating because the animals' actions are so similar to those of people. Along with gorillas, orangutans, lemurs, and others, monkeys belong to a group of mammals... Read More

To Catch a Dragonfly

To Catch a Dragonfly

Dragonflies date back at least 250 million years, says Daniel Soluk, an ecologist at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion. Alongside dinosaurs, they flitted across the prehistoric landscape on... Read More

Earth from the inside out

Earth from the inside out

Scientists have long known this strange fact: Itís easier to look deep into space than into the center of Earth. Light can pass through most of space, so the light from distant stars can easily be see... Read More









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