Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Watching out for vultures
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Monkey Math
Jay Watch
Behavior
Ear pain, weight gain
Seeing red means danger ahead
Primate Memory Showdown
Birds
Eagles
Dodos
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Diamond Glow
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
Music of the Future
Graphene's superstrength
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fingerprinting Fossils
Battling Mastodons
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Island of Hope
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Sahara Cemetery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Hagfish
Hammerhead Sharks
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Sponges' secret weapon
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Play for Science
Monkeys Count
Human Body
A Long Haul
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Praying Mantis
Crustaceans
Mammals
Mongooses
Moles
Manxes
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
The algae invasion
Fungus Hunt
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Copperhead Snakes
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
The two faces of Mars
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Beyond Bar Codes
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Dire Shortage of Water
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Baby Number WhizzesBaby Number Whizzes - Baby Number Whizzes

Baby Number Whizzes

It takes years of school to develop math skills, but learning about numbers starts earlier than you might think. At 3 months of age, babies have already started acquiring a concept of "how much," according to a new study. The finding isn't a total surpri Read More



Musclebots Take Some Steps

You've probably heard of robots. Now, make way for musclebots. Scientists in California have made tiny walking machines out of heart muscle grown from rat cells. When the muscle contracts, then relaxes, the musclebot takes a step. Read More

Pollution Detective

Kelydra Welcker's neighbors have an invisible problem. Kelydra, 17, lives in Parkersburg, W.Va. Nearby, a DuPont chemical plant makes a variety of products, including the nonstick material Teflon. Read More

Opposum

Opossums probably diverged from the basic South American marsupials in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene. A sister group is the Paucituberculata, or shrew opossums. They are commonly also called "possums". Read More

The Taste of Bubbles

What does fizz taste like? In bubbly beverages like soda or champagne, tiny bubbles give the drink a lift — and have a distinct taste. Scientists have long wondered how we taste these bubbles. In a new study on mice, scientists have connected that fizzy-t Read More

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. Read More

Chicken Talk

Translate this: Cluck cluck. Tck tck. Squawk. Get it? If you were a chicken, you might. According to new research, chickens make meaningful sounds that refer to objects around them. A pecking chicken that goes "tck, tck, tck," for example, is saying, "He Read More

Swifts

Swifts are the most aerial of birds and some, like the Common Swift, even sleep and mate on the wing. Larger species, such as white-throated needletail, are amongst the fastest flyers in animal kingdom. Read More

Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt

It can be hard to resist a bag of salty popcorn at the movies. Scientists may now be one step closer to explaining why. They have discovered several genes in fruit flies that help the insects detect salt. Read More

Secrets of an Ancient Computer

Computers go back farther in history than you might imagine. A mysterious mechanism found in a 2,000-year-old Greek shipwreck may have been used to calculate the positions of planets, predict when eclipses were to occur, and do other astronomical chores. Read More

Bumblebee Bats

The Bumblebee bat, or perhaps more correctly Kitti's Hog-nosed bat, (Craseonycteris thonglongyai) is the world's smallest species of bat at 30-40 mm in length and weighing approximately 2 grams (about the weight of a dime). Read More

Pollution at the ends of the Earth

No roads lead to Kuujjuaq. You can only get to this village, high in the Canadian Arctic, by boat or plane. The trees here are stunted and small, but the bears grow big. The 500 kids who live in Kuujjuaq (pronounced KOO-joo-ak) have unusual chores: they h Read More

Manta Rays

The manta ray, or giant manta (Manta birostris), is the largest of the rays, ranging up to 6.7 meters (22 ft) across its pectoral fins (or "wings") and weighing up to 1,350 kg (3,000 lb). Read More

How to Fly Like a Bat

It takes weeks, treats, and a lot of patience to train a bat to fly inside a wind tunnel. Bats already know how to fly, of course. The problem is to get them to do it inside a small tunnel with the wind rushing at them. So scientists at Brown University Read More

A Spider's Silky Strength

Legend has it that a Chinese princess discovered silk while drinking tea under a mulberry tree. A silkworm cocoon fell into her cup, and when she grabbed the bundle, it unwound into a single strand of silk. For thousands of years, the Chinese kept the pro Read More

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western part of Asia, and Africa. Read More

Longer lives for wild elephants

Most people think of zoos as safe havens for animals, where struggles such as difficulty finding food and avoiding predators don’t exist. Without such problems, animals in zoos should live to a ripe old age. But that may not be true for the largest land Read More

Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor

How did people get here? Some paleontologists are fascinated with tracing our ancestors back to the earliest possible times. A fossil skull in China is the latest clue to the origin of the human species. The fossil comes from the oldest known primate, a Read More

African Zebra

Zebras (members of the horse family), are native to central and southern Africa. They are black with white stripes. These stripes are typically vertical on the head, neck, forequarters, and main body, with horizontal stripes at the rear. Read More

Doberman Pinschers

The Doberman or Doberman Pinscher is a breed of domestic dog. Dobermans are commonly used as guard dogs, watch dogs, or police dogs. Dobermanns are one of the most recognizable breeds, both because of their actual roles in society and stereotyping. Read More

Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), also referred to simply as 'the devil', is a carnivorous marsupial now found only in the Australian island state of Tasmania. The Tasmanian Devil is the only extant member of the genus Sarcophilus. Read More

Wired for Math

Quick. What's 845 + 289? Sorry, time's up. Few people can add numbers in their heads that quickly. If someone showed you a set of 845 dots next to a set of 289 dots, however, you'd probably be able to tell right away which set has more dots. You could pr Read More

Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain

When you get really nervous about a soccer tournament or a school play, do you ever get the urge to eat a whole box of chocolates or a bowl of ice cream? If so, you're not alone. Read More

Searching for Alien Life

On a clear night, go outside, lie on your back, and stare into the sky. As you gaze at the multitude of stars, you might wonder: Is there life on other planets out there? Read More

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Unveiling Titan

Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. ... Read More

Early Maya Writing

Early Maya Writing

More than 2,000 years ago, a Maya scribe painted a pattern of thick black lines on a pyramid wall. Over centuries, these hieroglyphs disappeared from view as people took apart the wall and built bigge... Read More

Power of the Wind

Power of the Wind

On a breezy day, you can feel the wind in your hair, on your face, against your body. It tickles, pushes, or slams into you, depending on how hard it's blowing. When it's windy, you can fly a kite or ... Read More

Hot Summers, Wild Fires

Hot Summers, Wild Fires

A wood fire can be handy when you're camping. You can roast marshmallows or stay warm, for example. Forest fires that rage out of control, however, are a big problem. Wildfires cause hundreds of mill... Read More

A Smashing Display

A Smashing Display

Fireworks thrilled viewers all over the United States on the Fourth of July. An even bigger display took place deep in outer space on the same day. ... Read More

Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders are also called wind scorpions and sun spiders. Most live in tropical or semitropical regions where they inhabit warm and arid habitats, but some species have been known to live in grass... Read More

Eyes on the Depths

Eyes on the Depths

In Alice in Wonderland, a girl named Alice slides down a rabbit hole into a bizarre world that seems perfectly normal to the animals living there. But Wonderland is so different from the world above t... Read More

New Elephant-Shrew

New Elephant-Shrew

Feb. 6, 2008 The world is full of quirky creatures, and the elephant-shrew is a perfect example. These furry, long-nosed animals resemble a mix between miniature antelopes, anteaters, and rodents, say... Read More

Life under Ice

Life under Ice

Deep below a thick slab of floating ice off Antarctica, an astounding community of creatures has surprised scientists who had expected to find nothing there. In December 2003, researchers drilled a h... Read More

Food Web Woes

Food Web Woes

Sharks are scary—no doubt about it. Just ask anyone who's seen Jaws or other films that feature these sharp-toothed creatures. But there's something that might be just as scary as meeting up with a s... Read More

Toads

Toads

A distinction is often made between frogs and toads on the basis of their appearance, prompted by the convergent adaptation among so-called toads to dry environments, which often entails a brown skin ... Read More

Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics

Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics

Every year when school starts, you hear it in the classroom: a cough here, a snuffle there. Some weeks, more than half your class may be sneezing or hacking away. Colds spread quickly, passing from pe... Read More

Monkey Math

Monkey Math

You add like a monkey. No, really. Recent experiments with rhesus macaques suggest that monkeys do high-speed addition in much the same way as people do. Duke University researchers Elizabeth Brannon... Read More

Crime Lab

Crime Lab

Suppose you've just been in a car accident. A sport utility vehicle slammed into your little sedan at high speed. After the impact, your vehicle spun around before crashing into a telephone pole. ... Read More

An Ancient Childhood

An Ancient Childhood

History books are full of facts about adults. In school, you learn about the wars that grown-ups have fought, the kingdoms they've built and destroyed, and the cultures they've created. What about all... Read More









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